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Dropouts Say Their Schools Expected Too Little of Them

A survey of high school dropouts offers a surprising view of why they don't finish school. It finds that more than six in 10 were earning C's or above when they dropped out, and nearly two-thirds say they would have worked harder if expectations had been higher.

A survey of high school dropouts offers a surprising view of why they don't finish school. It finds that more than six in 10 were earning C's or above when they dropped out, and nearly two-thirds say they would have worked harder if expectations had been higher.  The survey, by Peter D. Hart Research Associates, polled 467 geographically, racially and economically diverse people ages 16 to 24 last summer and fall, using focus groups and face-to-face interviews. In many ways, the findings aren't unexpected. For example, about three-fourths say they would have stayed in school if they had to do it over again. But in other ways, the survey offers small, surprising glimpses into students' worlds: 38% say they had "too much freedom" and not enough rules in school, which made it easy to skip class; 68% say their parents became more involved in their education only when they were on the verge of dropping out; 70% are confident they could have graduated if they had tried; and 81% now believe that graduating from high school is important to succeed.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2006-03-01-dropouts-expectations_x.htm

Published Friday, Mar. 10, 2006

Dropouts Say Their Schools Expected Too Little of Them

A survey of high school dropouts offers a surprising view of why they don't finish school. It finds that more than six in 10 were earning C's or above when they dropped out, and nearly two-thirds say they would have worked harder if expectations had been higher.  The survey, by Peter D. Hart Research Associates, polled 467 geographically, racially and economically diverse people ages 16 to 24 last summer and fall, using focus groups and face-to-face interviews. In many ways, the findings aren't unexpected. For example, about three-fourths say they would have stayed in school if they had to do it over again. But in other ways, the survey offers small, surprising glimpses into students' worlds: 38% say they had "too much freedom" and not enough rules in school, which made it easy to skip class; 68% say their parents became more involved in their education only when they were on the verge of dropping out; 70% are confident they could have graduated if they had tried; and 81% now believe that graduating from high school is important to succeed.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2006-03-01-dropouts-expectations_x.htm

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