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The Plight of Black Males in Education

A recent report by Teachers College of Columbia University said black students underperform whites on a broad variety of academic and social indicators, including academic skills, critical thinking and preparation for skilled work. Meanwhile, a 2004 report by The Civil Rights Project at Harvard University and The Urban Institute noted that just 43 percent of black males graduated from high school in 2001, compared with 56 percent for black females and 71 percent for white males.
A recent report by Teachers College of Columbia University said black students underperform whites on a broad variety of academic and social indicators, including academic skills, critical thinking and preparation for skilled work. Meanwhile, a 2004 report by The Civil Rights Project at Harvard University and The Urban Institute noted that just 43 percent of black males graduated from high school in 2001, compared with 56 percent for black females and 71 percent for white males.

The failure to level the playing field is grounded in an educational system that neglects the needs of young black men and hasn't worked to address the inequities in urban schools.

This article, written by Dwight R. Worley, appeared in the March 11th, 2006 publication of The Journal News.

Published Sunday, Mar. 12, 2006

The Plight of Black Males in Education

A recent report by Teachers College of Columbia University said black students underperform whites on a broad variety of academic and social indicators, including academic skills, critical thinking and preparation for skilled work. Meanwhile, a 2004 report by The Civil Rights Project at Harvard University and The Urban Institute noted that just 43 percent of black males graduated from high school in 2001, compared with 56 percent for black females and 71 percent for white males.

The failure to level the playing field is grounded in an educational system that neglects the needs of young black men and hasn't worked to address the inequities in urban schools.

This article, written by Dwight R. Worley, appeared in the March 11th, 2006 publication of The Journal News.

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