To Hear Why No Child Fails, Just Listen To Its Supporters | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
News & Events Header

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

To Hear Why No Child Fails, Just Listen To Its Supporters

Rothstein insists that the data are in and the evidence is clear: Great schools alone cannot reduce the achievement gap. Expecting that is irresponsible. The education researcher, author and visiting professor at Columbia University Teachers College points to the vast disparities in child-rearing practices, health care, nutrition, early childhood educational opportunities and access to decent housing as the real factors affecting student achievement.
Rothstein insists that the data are in and the evidence is clear: Great schools alone cannot reduce the achievement gap. Expecting that is irresponsible. The education researcher, author and visiting professor at Columbia University Teachers College points to the vast disparities in child-rearing practices, health care, nutrition, early childhood educational opportunities and access to decent housing as the real factors affecting student achievement.

"We say we want to close the achievement gap between advantaged and disadvantaged children, and we're simultaneously withdrawing support from the social and economic institutions that could enhance equality-'.Holding out the goal of closing the achievement gap through school reform alone is dangerous," Rothstein said. "Holding schools responsible for a goal they can't meet will doom public education."

This article, written by Diane Carman, appeared in the March 23rd, 2006 publication of The Denver Post.

Published Thursday, Mar. 23, 2006

To Hear Why No Child Fails, Just Listen To Its Supporters

Rothstein insists that the data are in and the evidence is clear: Great schools alone cannot reduce the achievement gap. Expecting that is irresponsible. The education researcher, author and visiting professor at Columbia University Teachers College points to the vast disparities in child-rearing practices, health care, nutrition, early childhood educational opportunities and access to decent housing as the real factors affecting student achievement.

"We say we want to close the achievement gap between advantaged and disadvantaged children, and we're simultaneously withdrawing support from the social and economic institutions that could enhance equality-'.Holding out the goal of closing the achievement gap through school reform alone is dangerous," Rothstein said. "Holding schools responsible for a goal they can't meet will doom public education."

This article, written by Diane Carman, appeared in the March 23rd, 2006 publication of The Denver Post.

How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends