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Afghan Education Shows Progress Amid the Rubble

Afghanistan suffered another blow to its campaign to rebuild its ravaged school system last week when a rocket exploded on the grounds of a school in Asadabad, killing six children. But the spate of recent attacks on schools, teachers, and students has not threatened plans to open up educational opportunities for all children, especially girls, throughout the Southern Asian nation, observers say.
Afghanistan suffered another blow to its campaign to rebuild its ravaged school system last week when a rocket exploded on the grounds of a school in Asadabad, killing six children. But the spate of recent attacks on schools, teachers, and students has not threatened plans to open up educational opportunities for all children, especially girls, throughout the Southern Asian nation, observers say.

"The security issue is still the biggest issue in Afghanistan," said Barry Rosen, the director of a curriculum and teacher-training project in Kabul sponsored by Teachers College, Columbia University. "Until and unless that situation is changed, it will be very hard to not just build schools but to also build the educational system to where teachers are actually teaching."

This article, written by Kathleen Kennedy Manzo, appeared in the April 19th, 2006 publication of Education Week.

Published Wednesday, May. 3, 2006

Afghan Education Shows Progress Amid the Rubble

Afghanistan suffered another blow to its campaign to rebuild its ravaged school system last week when a rocket exploded on the grounds of a school in Asadabad, killing six children. But the spate of recent attacks on schools, teachers, and students has not threatened plans to open up educational opportunities for all children, especially girls, throughout the Southern Asian nation, observers say.

"The security issue is still the biggest issue in Afghanistan," said Barry Rosen, the director of a curriculum and teacher-training project in Kabul sponsored by Teachers College, Columbia University. "Until and unless that situation is changed, it will be very hard to not just build schools but to also build the educational system to where teachers are actually teaching."

This article, written by Kathleen Kennedy Manzo, appeared in the April 19th, 2006 publication of Education Week.

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