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Is eating produce in a restaurant a risky menu selection?

E. coli, salmonella scares have diners worried Cox News Service Atlanta. Ordering a side salad instead of fries or adding lettuce and tomato to a deli sandwich is pretty basic nutrition advice for diners who want to make healthier choices. recent reports of food-borne illnesses such as E. coli and salmonella contamination of fresh produce understandably have many people on edge.

E. coli, salmonella scares have diners worried Cox News Service Atlanta.  Ordering a side salad instead of fries or adding lettuce and tomato to a deli sandwich is pretty basic nutrition advice for diners who want to make healthier choices.  recent reports of food-borne illnesses such as E. coli and salmonella contamination of fresh produce understandably have many people on edge.

Registered dietitian Kyle Shadix, who teaches food safety at Teachers College, Columbia
University
, says: "Uncooked produce should be served cold, and if your fruit salad is room temperature, send it back. Bacteria thrive at temperatures between 40 and 140 degrees, and the warmer it is, the more they grow."

This article appeared in the November 8, 2006 edition of the Freeman.

http://www.freemanol.com/

Published Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2006

Is eating produce in a restaurant a risky menu selection?

E. coli, salmonella scares have diners worried Cox News Service Atlanta.  Ordering a side salad instead of fries or adding lettuce and tomato to a deli sandwich is pretty basic nutrition advice for diners who want to make healthier choices.  recent reports of food-borne illnesses such as E. coli and salmonella contamination of fresh produce understandably have many people on edge.

Registered dietitian Kyle Shadix, who teaches food safety at Teachers College, Columbia
University
, says: "Uncooked produce should be served cold, and if your fruit salad is room temperature, send it back. Bacteria thrive at temperatures between 40 and 140 degrees, and the warmer it is, the more they grow."

This article appeared in the November 8, 2006 edition of the Freeman.

http://www.freemanol.com/

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