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Education Trust Releases Recommendations for Revamping NCLB

In preparation for this year's reauthorization of the federal No Child Left Behind Act, the Education Trust released its recommendations to Congress last week. Among their suggestions are that Congress alter how NCLB holds states accountable for meeting Annual Yearly Progress targets and direct more federal funds to high poverty schools.
In preparation for this year's reauthorization of the federal No Child Left Behind Act, the Education Trust released its recommendations to Congress last week. Among their suggestions are that Congress alter how NCLB holds states accountable for meeting Annual Yearly Progress targets and direct more federal funds to high poverty schools. 

Specifically, the Ed Trust recommends that the government continue to hold states responsible for student progress. Yet, under their proposal, states would have three options for how to assess students' proficiency levels. States can choose between 1) Maintaining the current AYP model, but introducing new achievement goals for states where the gap between state results and NAEP are too wide, 2) A growth model that counts students as proficient if they are on a trajectory to meet proficiency in three years, or 3) a new accountability model with extended timelines and revised goals if the state raises their standards to a "college- and career-ready level."

 Of note is the Education Trust's emphasis on providing states with the necessary resources to better support schools in need of improvement. In particular, they emphasize the need for greater funding to support teacher professional development, improve curricula, and establish data systems to track student achievement and improve teacher effectiveness.

 Because the Education Trust played a strong advisory role in the original drafting of the legislation in 2001, according the Education Week, their recommendations may have a noteworthy influence in this year's deliberations over its renewal.

Published Thursday, May. 3, 2007

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Education Trust Releases Recommendations for Revamping NCLB

In preparation for this year's reauthorization of the federal No Child Left Behind Act, the Education Trust released its recommendations to Congress last week. Among their suggestions are that Congress alter how NCLB holds states accountable for meeting Annual Yearly Progress targets and direct more federal funds to high poverty schools. 

Specifically, the Ed Trust recommends that the government continue to hold states responsible for student progress. Yet, under their proposal, states would have three options for how to assess students' proficiency levels. States can choose between 1) Maintaining the current AYP model, but introducing new achievement goals for states where the gap between state results and NAEP are too wide, 2) A growth model that counts students as proficient if they are on a trajectory to meet proficiency in three years, or 3) a new accountability model with extended timelines and revised goals if the state raises their standards to a "college- and career-ready level."

 Of note is the Education Trust's emphasis on providing states with the necessary resources to better support schools in need of improvement. In particular, they emphasize the need for greater funding to support teacher professional development, improve curricula, and establish data systems to track student achievement and improve teacher effectiveness.

 Because the Education Trust played a strong advisory role in the original drafting of the legislation in 2001, according the Education Week, their recommendations may have a noteworthy influence in this year's deliberations over its renewal.

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