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Free as a bird and loving it

The Census Bureau reports about 97 million unmarried Americans ages 18 and over in 2006, the most recent numbers available.

The Census Bureau reports about 97 million unmarried Americans ages 18 and over in 2006, the most recent numbers available. That represents 44% of Americans 18 and over; a quarter have never been married; 10% are divorced, 6% widowed, and 2% separated.

"It's probably the best moment for singles in our history -' because of the attitudes of popular support and the numbers," says Pat Palmieri, a social historian at Teachers College at Columbia University, who is writing a history of singles in America since 1870. She is 60 and has never been married.

Young adults are delaying marriage and have a longer life expectancy, experts say, so more Americans will spend more of their adult lives single. As their ranks multiply, singles aren't waiting for a partner to buy a home or even have a child. They've decided to embrace single-hood for however long it lasts.

This article appeared in the April 13, 2007 edition of the USA Today.

http://www.usatoday.com/life/lifestyle/2007-04-11-being-single_N.htm

Published Friday, Apr. 13, 2007

Free as a bird and loving it

The Census Bureau reports about 97 million unmarried Americans ages 18 and over in 2006, the most recent numbers available. That represents 44% of Americans 18 and over; a quarter have never been married; 10% are divorced, 6% widowed, and 2% separated.

"It's probably the best moment for singles in our history -' because of the attitudes of popular support and the numbers," says Pat Palmieri, a social historian at Teachers College at Columbia University, who is writing a history of singles in America since 1870. She is 60 and has never been married.

Young adults are delaying marriage and have a longer life expectancy, experts say, so more Americans will spend more of their adult lives single. As their ranks multiply, singles aren't waiting for a partner to buy a home or even have a child. They've decided to embrace single-hood for however long it lasts.

This article appeared in the April 13, 2007 edition of the USA Today.

http://www.usatoday.com/life/lifestyle/2007-04-11-being-single_N.htm
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