Will a Tidy House Help Your Child Learn to Read? | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
News & Events Header

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

Will a Tidy House Help Your Child Learn to Read?

The blog Birth to Thrive Online reports on a study released earlier this year by Teachers College, which found that an orderly household can help develop children's early reading skills. The "study suggests household order, though not your home's noise, is associated with early reading, though only where mom is an above-average reader," reports Paul Nyhan. The study was conducted by Anna D. Johnson and Anne Martin at the National Center for Children and Families at Teachers College, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn at the National Center for Children and Families and the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University, and Stephen A. Petrill at Ohio State University. To read the full post, click here . For more information about the study, click here.
The blog Birth to Thrive Online reports on a study released earlier this year by Teachers College, which found that an orderly household can help develop children’s early reading skills. The “study suggests household order, though not your home’s noise, is associated with early reading, though only where mom is an above-average reader,” reports Paul Nyhan. The study was conducted by Anna D. Johnson and Anne Martin at the National Center for Children and Families at Teachers College, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn at the National Center for Children and Families and the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University, and Stephen A. Petrill at Ohio State University. To read the full post, click here . For more information about the study, click here.

Published Monday, Aug. 3, 2009

Will a Tidy House Help Your Child Learn to Read?

The blog Birth to Thrive Online reports on a study released earlier this year by Teachers College, which found that an orderly household can help develop children’s early reading skills. The “study suggests household order, though not your home’s noise, is associated with early reading, though only where mom is an above-average reader,” reports Paul Nyhan. The study was conducted by Anna D. Johnson and Anne Martin at the National Center for Children and Families at Teachers College, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn at the National Center for Children and Families and the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University, and Stephen A. Petrill at Ohio State University. To read the full post, click here . For more information about the study, click here.
How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends