Helping Kids Read During the Summer | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
News & Events Header

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

Helping Kids Read During the Summer

Lucy Calkins, Robinson Professor in Children's Literature at Teachers College, is featured in a parenting column on the Boston Globe's Web site in which she advises parents to keep children reading during the summer months to avoid the "summer slide" by, if need be, reading a few chapters or an entire book aloud together.
Lucy Calkins, Robinson Professor in Children’s Literature at Teachers College, is featured in a parenting column on the Boston Globe’s Web site in which she advises parents to keep children reading during the summer months to avoid the “summer slide” by, among other tips, reading a few chapters or an entire book aloud together.

Calkins said that the summer slide is real and research indicates that children who don’t read during the summer months take until November to get back to where they were the previous academic year. And there are other consequences. “If a child starts off weak, the teacher sees her as not a good student,” Calkins says in the article. “She comes to accept that about her.”

To read the article, go to http://www.boston.com/community/moms/blogs/child_caring/2009/07/about_that_pesk.html.

Published Friday, Jul. 31, 2009

Helping Kids Read During the Summer

Lucy Calkins, Robinson Professor in Children’s Literature at Teachers College, is featured in a parenting column on the Boston Globe’s Web site in which she advises parents to keep children reading during the summer months to avoid the “summer slide” by, among other tips, reading a few chapters or an entire book aloud together.

Calkins said that the summer slide is real and research indicates that children who don’t read during the summer months take until November to get back to where they were the previous academic year. And there are other consequences. “If a child starts off weak, the teacher sees her as not a good student,” Calkins says in the article. “She comes to accept that about her.”

To read the article, go to http://www.boston.com/community/moms/blogs/child_caring/2009/07/about_that_pesk.html.

How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends