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Alumna Sabrina Hope King Honored By New York's Independent Colleges And Universities

TC alumna Sabrina Hope King received the 2009 Alumni Hall of Distinction Award from the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities on March 2 in Albany.
TC alumna Sabrina Hope King was among 21 graduates of independent colleges and universities throughout New York who were honored on March 2 by the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities during its 2009 Alumni Hall of Distinction Awards Ceremony and Legislative Reception at the New York State Capitol in Albany.
King is the chief academic officer in the Office of Curriculum and Development at the New York City Department of Education. She received a doctorate in urban education leadership from Teachers College in 1991, a master’s degree in educational supervision in 1985, and a master of arts degree in curriculum and teaching in 1984.
 
“My diverse roles within the field of education enabled me to influence policy and practice on a local and national level,” says King, who has served as a teacher principal and assistant superintendent in K-12 schools, as an executive with the Wallace Foundation, and as a dean and faculty member in higher education. “Right after graduating from college, I knew a career in education would be my calling. Having majored in African-American history, I also knew I wanted to ensure that students received an education that was relevant to their experiences and meaningful to their lives.”
 
As she worked on her graduate degrees in education, King was a history teacher and dean at A. Philip Randolph Campus High School in Harlem. After earning her doctorate in education, she was recruited by the University of Illinois as a professor of urban development, where she focused on improving urban teacher education. Eventually she returned to New York to a professorship at Hofstra University, supporting standards-based instructional improvement in New York City schools.
 
For nearly 30 years, she has focused her career on urban educational improvement and on improving the educational experiences and outcomes of students of color. She has worked to improve student achievement, develop school-university partnerships, and provided leadership to numerous school districts.
 
The 2009 Alumni Hall honored inspirational elementary school educators and school leaders (principals, superintendents and school business officers) who have brought attention to the pivotal role that private colleges and universities play in preparing New York State’s teachers, educating students at all levels, and administering essential school programs. Each year, more than 17,500 students earn education degrees at 86 Independent Sector campus locations.
 
The Commission created the Alumni Hall in 2000 to recognize New York’s Independent Sector graduates who have made extraordinary contributions to society through their careers and community involvement. The reception was part of CICU’s 53rd Annual Meeting for college and university presidents. 

Published Wednesday, Mar. 18, 2009

Alumna Sabrina Hope King Honored By New York's Independent Colleges And Universities

TC alumna Sabrina Hope King was among 21 graduates of independent colleges and universities throughout New York who were honored on March 2 by the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities during its 2009 Alumni Hall of Distinction Awards Ceremony and Legislative Reception at the New York State Capitol in Albany.
King is the chief academic officer in the Office of Curriculum and Development at the New York City Department of Education. She received a doctorate in urban education leadership from Teachers College in 1991, a master’s degree in educational supervision in 1985, and a master of arts degree in curriculum and teaching in 1984.
 
“My diverse roles within the field of education enabled me to influence policy and practice on a local and national level,” says King, who has served as a teacher principal and assistant superintendent in K-12 schools, as an executive with the Wallace Foundation, and as a dean and faculty member in higher education. “Right after graduating from college, I knew a career in education would be my calling. Having majored in African-American history, I also knew I wanted to ensure that students received an education that was relevant to their experiences and meaningful to their lives.”
 
As she worked on her graduate degrees in education, King was a history teacher and dean at A. Philip Randolph Campus High School in Harlem. After earning her doctorate in education, she was recruited by the University of Illinois as a professor of urban development, where she focused on improving urban teacher education. Eventually she returned to New York to a professorship at Hofstra University, supporting standards-based instructional improvement in New York City schools.
 
For nearly 30 years, she has focused her career on urban educational improvement and on improving the educational experiences and outcomes of students of color. She has worked to improve student achievement, develop school-university partnerships, and provided leadership to numerous school districts.
 
The 2009 Alumni Hall honored inspirational elementary school educators and school leaders (principals, superintendents and school business officers) who have brought attention to the pivotal role that private colleges and universities play in preparing New York State’s teachers, educating students at all levels, and administering essential school programs. Each year, more than 17,500 students earn education degrees at 86 Independent Sector campus locations.
 
The Commission created the Alumni Hall in 2000 to recognize New York’s Independent Sector graduates who have made extraordinary contributions to society through their careers and community involvement. The reception was part of CICU’s 53rd Annual Meeting for college and university presidents. 
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