A Tale of Two Cities | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
News & Events Header

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

A Tale of Two Cities

A new book by former TC President Arthur Levine and current doctoral student Laura Scheiber contrasts the Jewish working class Bronx neighborhood of Levine's youth with the primarily Dominican community that resides there today. Click here to hear Levine and Scheiber discussing the book on NPR's "All Things Considered," and click here to view a video about the book created by TC's Ed Lab.
A Tale of Two Cities

When Arthur Levine became President of Teachers College in 1994, he went back to visit the neighborhood where he’d grown up, on Creston Avenue in the Bronx. He knocked on the door of his boyhood apartment and met the family living there – including Carlos, the 14-year-old boy who was growing up in his old room.

Out of that visit has emerged Unequal Fortunes: Snapshots from the South Bronx, by Levine (now President of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation) and Laura Scheiber, a current doctoral student at TC. The book, which chronicles the fortunes of Carlos and his two best friends, Leo and Juan Carols, is a meditation on the disparities between the Jewish working class neighborhood of Levine’s youth and the much bleaker world that confronts the mostly Dominican community living there today. All three boys kept journals that they shared with the authors. Yet the project also changed dramatically at mid-stream, when Leo was shot and killed by a police officer in 2005.

"We concluded his story best demonstrated the realities of life on Creston Avenue today,” Levine and Scheiber write in their prologue. “This is a book about changing times and the ways in which the bar for mobility has been profoundly raised. In the more than 40 years since Arthur left Creston Avenue, the United States has shifted from an industrial to an information economy.” Which is why, they conclude, “we believe that education is still the foremost path out of poverty for the poor in America today.”

Levine and Scheiber are scheduled to give a book talk at TC’s Gottesman Libraries on September 14th, from 4 to 5:30 p.m. They will also be guests this afternoon on National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered” show. A link to the archived recording of the show will appear here tomorrow.


Published Wednesday, Jul. 14, 2010

A Tale of Two Cities

A Tale of Two Cities

When Arthur Levine became President of Teachers College in 1994, he went back to visit the neighborhood where he’d grown up, on Creston Avenue in the Bronx. He knocked on the door of his boyhood apartment and met the family living there – including Carlos, the 14-year-old boy who was growing up in his old room.

Out of that visit has emerged Unequal Fortunes: Snapshots from the South Bronx, by Levine (now President of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation) and Laura Scheiber, a current doctoral student at TC. The book, which chronicles the fortunes of Carlos and his two best friends, Leo and Juan Carols, is a meditation on the disparities between the Jewish working class neighborhood of Levine’s youth and the much bleaker world that confronts the mostly Dominican community living there today. All three boys kept journals that they shared with the authors. Yet the project also changed dramatically at mid-stream, when Leo was shot and killed by a police officer in 2005.

"We concluded his story best demonstrated the realities of life on Creston Avenue today,” Levine and Scheiber write in their prologue. “This is a book about changing times and the ways in which the bar for mobility has been profoundly raised. In the more than 40 years since Arthur left Creston Avenue, the United States has shifted from an industrial to an information economy.” Which is why, they conclude, “we believe that education is still the foremost path out of poverty for the poor in America today.”

Levine and Scheiber are scheduled to give a book talk at TC’s Gottesman Libraries on September 14th, from 4 to 5:30 p.m. They will also be guests this afternoon on National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered” show. A link to the archived recording of the show will appear here tomorrow.


How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends