Can "Failing Schools" Become "Community Schools"? | Teachers College Columbia University

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Can "Failing Schools" Become "Community Schools"?

On Monday, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced a $150 million plan to save 94 failing schools by converting them "community schools" that deliver onsite social services to students and families. The schools will expand their budgets, staffs and daily hours. The Mayor's plan would mark a major shift from that of the previous administration, which closed many large, failing schools and replaced them with smaller ones. Students at the 94 schools will benefit from additional instruction -- including, in many instances, summer school courses -- while teachers will receive more professional development extra professional training. 

Three TC experts -- Charles Basch, Richard March Hoe Professor of Health Education; former New York City Deputy Schools Chancellor Eric Nadelstern,   Professor of Practice in Educational Leadership; and Aaron Pallas,Arthur I. Gates Professor of Sociology and Education, offer differing takes on the Mayor's plan. 


A Risky Response to an Urgent Need

By Aaron Pallas

Published Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014

Can "Failing Schools" Become "Community Schools"?

On Monday, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced a $150 million plan to save 94 failing schools by converting them "community schools" that deliver onsite social services to students and families. The schools will expand their budgets, staffs and daily hours. The Mayor's plan would mark a major shift from that of the previous administration, which closed many large, failing schools and replaced them with smaller ones. Students at the 94 schools will benefit from additional instruction -- including, in many instances, summer school courses -- while teachers will receive more professional development extra professional training. 

Three TC experts -- Charles Basch, Richard March Hoe Professor of Health Education; former New York City Deputy Schools Chancellor Eric Nadelstern,   Professor of Practice in Educational Leadership; and Aaron Pallas,Arthur I. Gates Professor of Sociology and Education, offer differing takes on the Mayor's plan. 


A Risky Response to an Urgent Need

By Aaron Pallas

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