TC a National Leader in Awarding Doctorates to Black Student... | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
News & Events Header

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

TC a National Leader in Awarding Doctorates to Black Students

Teachers College, Columbia University, ranks sixth among U.S. universities in granting the most doctoral degrees to black students, according to the 2014 Almanac of Higher Education released last week by The Chronicle of Higher Education

Teachers College is also the top-ranked private, not-for-profit higher educational institution in the category of black doctoral degree recipients, preceded only by historically Black institutions, a for-profit, online university, and comprehensive public universities.

The report, which covers the five-year period from 2008 to 2012, ranks 376 universities in number of doctorate recipients from minority groups by race and ethnicity.

“We are proud that TC is a national leader in granting doctoral degrees to African Americans. For TC to outpace major universities whose student populations number 20,000 or more is an extraordinary accomplishment, indeed,” said Teachers College President Susan H. Fuhrman. “Our record is a testament to our longstanding commitment to providing advanced educational opportunity to students of color, as well as to the hard work and achievements of our outstanding doctoral students, faculty, administration and staff. But our work is not done. We continue to strive to be a leader in attracting and graduating students across the diverse groups represented in this survey." 

Throughout its history, Teachers College has attracted top students from diverse backgrounds who have gone on to have a positive impact on schools and communities all over the world. During the 1930s and 40s, the College prepared many aspiring African-American teachers from the South who were denied admission to higher education institutions in their home states. Alumna Marion Thompson Wright, one of the nation’s first black history PhDs, became a leading historian of African-Americans in U.S. education. 

Link: http://chronicle.com/article/Universities-With-the-Most/147713/

The Chronicle releases its Almanac of Higher Education annually. This year’s edition covers a range of categories including professions, students, diversity, finance, technology, international students, and state statistics.

Link: http://chronicle.com/section/Almanac-of-Higher-Education/801/


Published Tuesday, Sep. 2, 2014

TC a National Leader in Awarding Doctorates to Black Students

Teachers College, Columbia University, ranks sixth among U.S. universities in granting the most doctoral degrees to black students, according to the 2014 Almanac of Higher Education released last week by The Chronicle of Higher Education

Teachers College is also the top-ranked private, not-for-profit higher educational institution in the category of black doctoral degree recipients, preceded only by historically Black institutions, a for-profit, online university, and comprehensive public universities.

The report, which covers the five-year period from 2008 to 2012, ranks 376 universities in number of doctorate recipients from minority groups by race and ethnicity.

“We are proud that TC is a national leader in granting doctoral degrees to African Americans. For TC to outpace major universities whose student populations number 20,000 or more is an extraordinary accomplishment, indeed,” said Teachers College President Susan H. Fuhrman. “Our record is a testament to our longstanding commitment to providing advanced educational opportunity to students of color, as well as to the hard work and achievements of our outstanding doctoral students, faculty, administration and staff. But our work is not done. We continue to strive to be a leader in attracting and graduating students across the diverse groups represented in this survey." 

Throughout its history, Teachers College has attracted top students from diverse backgrounds who have gone on to have a positive impact on schools and communities all over the world. During the 1930s and 40s, the College prepared many aspiring African-American teachers from the South who were denied admission to higher education institutions in their home states. Alumna Marion Thompson Wright, one of the nation’s first black history PhDs, became a leading historian of African-Americans in U.S. education. 

Link: http://chronicle.com/article/Universities-With-the-Most/147713/

The Chronicle releases its Almanac of Higher Education annually. This year’s edition covers a range of categories including professions, students, diversity, finance, technology, international students, and state statistics.

Link: http://chronicle.com/section/Almanac-of-Higher-Education/801/


How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends