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Tisch Food Center Inaugural Study: Only 39% of NYC Public Elementary Schools Have Nutrition Education

It's no secret that there is a big national effort to combat childhood obesity by providing healthy food choices in public schools. But it's not enough to offer kids fruits and vegetables; they need education about why apples and carrots are better for them than potato chips.

While New York City has made progress in providing healthy food and nutrition education, public schools reopened this week with a majority -- 61 percent -- still not providing nutrition education programs designed and provided by outside experts, according to a study released by the Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education & Policy at Teachers College. The Center is calling for a goal to double programs by 2020.

The study, "Expanding Nutrition Education Programs in New York City Elementary Schools: Understanding Practice to Inform Policy," analyzed 20 nutrition education programs in more than 600 elementary schools in Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens, that are offered by nonprofits, universities and other groups.

“There is much room for expansion,” said Pamela Koch, EdD, RD, Executive Director, Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education & Policy at Teachers College. “Ultimately, we would like to see strong policies at the local, state, and federal levels that support the implementation and reach of high-quality food and nutrition education in schools.”

For a complete news release, including links to the full study and a summary of the study, please go to: http://bit.ly/1AbjqBj To view the full report, go to http://bit.ly/1u4s0Su To view the executive summary, go to:  http://bit.ly/1t59PJN


Published Friday, Sep. 5, 2014

Tisch Food Center Inaugural Study: Only 39% of NYC Public Elementary Schools Have Nutrition Education

It's no secret that there is a big national effort to combat childhood obesity by providing healthy food choices in public schools. But it's not enough to offer kids fruits and vegetables; they need education about why apples and carrots are better for them than potato chips.

While New York City has made progress in providing healthy food and nutrition education, public schools reopened this week with a majority -- 61 percent -- still not providing nutrition education programs designed and provided by outside experts, according to a study released by the Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education & Policy at Teachers College. The Center is calling for a goal to double programs by 2020.

The study, "Expanding Nutrition Education Programs in New York City Elementary Schools: Understanding Practice to Inform Policy," analyzed 20 nutrition education programs in more than 600 elementary schools in Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens, that are offered by nonprofits, universities and other groups.

“There is much room for expansion,” said Pamela Koch, EdD, RD, Executive Director, Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education & Policy at Teachers College. “Ultimately, we would like to see strong policies at the local, state, and federal levels that support the implementation and reach of high-quality food and nutrition education in schools.”

For a complete news release, including links to the full study and a summary of the study, please go to: http://bit.ly/1AbjqBj To view the full report, go to http://bit.ly/1u4s0Su To view the executive summary, go to:  http://bit.ly/1t59PJN


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