How Poverty Affects Kids' Brains: TC's Kimberly Noble speaks at Columbia's Zucke | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
News & Events Header

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

How Poverty Affects Kids' Brains: TC's Kimberly Noble speaks at Columbia's Zuckerman Institute

As part of the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Brain Insight series at Columbia University's Zuckerman Institute, Kimberly Noble, TC Associate Professor of Neuroscience & Education, lectured on Socioeconomic Disparities, Children and Brain Development.


In April 2015 Noble coauthored a study in Nature Neuroscience which found that in young people ages 3 to 20, increases in the surface area of brain regions implicated in language and executive functions were strongly correlated with higher family income. Higher income was also associated with better performance in certain cognitive skills that could be accounted for in part by greater brain surface area.


In her talk at the Zuckerman Institute, Noble presented
the latest results of her pilot study designed to investigate whether boosting the monthly income of new mothers also leads to increases in brain growth and development.

Read an article about Noble's work, as well as an opinion piece she published in The Washington Post.

Published Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016

Kimberly Noble
Kimberly Noble, Associate Professor of Neuroscience & Education

As part of the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Brain Insight series at Columbia University's Zuckerman Institute, Kimberly Noble, TC Associate Professor of Neuroscience & Education, lectured on Socioeconomic Disparities, Children and Brain Development.


In April 2015 Noble coauthored a study in Nature Neuroscience which found that in young people ages 3 to 20, increases in the surface area of brain regions implicated in language and executive functions were strongly correlated with higher family income. Higher income was also associated with better performance in certain cognitive skills that could be accounted for in part by greater brain surface area.


In her talk at the Zuckerman Institute, Noble presented
the latest results of her pilot study designed to investigate whether boosting the monthly income of new mothers also leads to increases in brain growth and development.

Read an article about Noble's work, as well as an opinion piece she published in The Washington Post.
How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends