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TC's Sonali Rajan in Business Insider: Gun Violence Prevention Requires More Than Mental Health Services

 

Sonali Rajan, an Assistant Professor of Health Education who has studied gun violence among youth, talked to Business Insider following President Obama's State of the Union Address on January 12, in which the President renewed his commitment to "protecting our kids against gun violence." Obama had previously announced new executive actions including tougher rules on background checks for gun purchasers, instructing the FBI to hire additional agents to process background checks, and proposing more than $500 million in funding toward mental-health treatment. But Rajan said that, in addition to curbing access to guns and treating mental health issues, "it's imperative to be investing in programs at schools and community centers that teach kids how to cope with anger and other emotions in a non-violent way."

LINK: Gun-violence researcher: Here's what Obama's big new steps on guns are missing (Business Insider)

The views expressed in the previous article are solely those of the speakers to whom they are attributed. They do not necessarily reflect the views of the faculty, administration, or staff either of Teachers College or of Columbia University.

Published Saturday, Jan 16, 2016

Sonali Rajan
Sonali Rajan, Assistant Professor of Health Education

 

Sonali Rajan, an Assistant Professor of Health Education who has studied gun violence among youth, talked to Business Insider following President Obama's State of the Union Address on January 12, in which the President renewed his commitment to "protecting our kids against gun violence." Obama had previously announced new executive actions including tougher rules on background checks for gun purchasers, instructing the FBI to hire additional agents to process background checks, and proposing more than $500 million in funding toward mental-health treatment. But Rajan said that, in addition to curbing access to guns and treating mental health issues, "it's imperative to be investing in programs at schools and community centers that teach kids how to cope with anger and other emotions in a non-violent way."

LINK: Gun-violence researcher: Here's what Obama's big new steps on guns are missing (Business Insider)

The views expressed in the previous article are solely those of the speakers to whom they are attributed. They do not necessarily reflect the views of the faculty, administration, or staff either of Teachers College or of Columbia University.

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