TC Student Martha St. Jean Reflects on the Traumatic Effects of Police Shootings | Teachers College Columbia University

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In The Huffington Post: TC Student Martha St. Jean Reflects on the Traumatic Effects of Police Shootings in the Black Community

 

Writing in the Huffington PostMartha St. Jean reflects on her studies in TC's Masters in Secondary Inclusive Education program with a focus on social justice in light of the recent police shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile.

“I have been deeply considering the effects of trauma,” writes St. Jean, who is also a member of the Teaching Residents at TC (TR@TC) program. “As a member of Teachers College’s residency program, I am meditating on the phrase ‘trauma is embodied.’ The phrase stayed with me during a recent intensive session discussing relational and positive approaches to student behavior.”

Trauma in black communities and its embodiment in her black students has affected their behavior and learning, and added to the normal, everyday challenges of learning to be a teacher, St. Jean writes. “Teaching is loving, and I cannot love if I view these kids through a pathological lens associated with color. Being black is not a deficit; it is a difference.”

To read the opinion piece, go here.

Published Thursday, Jul 7, 2016

Martha St. Jean
Martha St. Jean

 

Writing in the Huffington PostMartha St. Jean reflects on her studies in TC's Masters in Secondary Inclusive Education program with a focus on social justice in light of the recent police shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile.

“I have been deeply considering the effects of trauma,” writes St. Jean, who is also a member of the Teaching Residents at TC (TR@TC) program. “As a member of Teachers College’s residency program, I am meditating on the phrase ‘trauma is embodied.’ The phrase stayed with me during a recent intensive session discussing relational and positive approaches to student behavior.”

Trauma in black communities and its embodiment in her black students has affected their behavior and learning, and added to the normal, everyday challenges of learning to be a teacher, St. Jean writes. “Teaching is loving, and I cannot love if I view these kids through a pathological lens associated with color. Being black is not a deficit; it is a difference.”

To read the opinion piece, go here.

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