WNYC Radio's SchoolBook Quotes Amy Stuart Wells on Solving NYC Segregation Probl | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
News & Events Header

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

WNYC Radio's SchoolBook Quotes Amy Stuart Wells on Solving NYC Segregation Problem

 

TC's Amy Stuart Wells is quoted in a story on WNYC's SchoolBook blog about New York City's invitation to public schools to develop new admissions requirements that would promote greater diversity. Several observers had said that the segregation problem is so large that changing admissions policies at individual schools wouldn't go far enough. The story cites a recent study by UCLA that found that the city's schools are among the most segregated in the nation. 

"There needs to be a balance between schools so we can stabilize them," said Wells, a professor of sociology and education.

"Wells called for more centralized planning that takes into account neighborhoods that are rapidly gentrifying, because that's where there's a greater potential for mixing students of different income levels," SchoolBook reports. "Numerous studies [including one by Wells herself, for the Century Foundation last February] have found low-income students do better academically when they're in classrooms with students of different backgrounds."

LINK: City Invites More Schools to Try Diversity Initiatives (WNYC)

Published Wednesday, Jun 1, 2016

Amy Stuart Wells
Amy Stuart Wells, Professor of Sociology and Education

 

TC's Amy Stuart Wells is quoted in a story on WNYC's SchoolBook blog about New York City's invitation to public schools to develop new admissions requirements that would promote greater diversity. Several observers had said that the segregation problem is so large that changing admissions policies at individual schools wouldn't go far enough. The story cites a recent study by UCLA that found that the city's schools are among the most segregated in the nation. 

"There needs to be a balance between schools so we can stabilize them," said Wells, a professor of sociology and education.

"Wells called for more centralized planning that takes into account neighborhoods that are rapidly gentrifying, because that's where there's a greater potential for mixing students of different income levels," SchoolBook reports. "Numerous studies [including one by Wells herself, for the Century Foundation last February] have found low-income students do better academically when they're in classrooms with students of different backgrounds."

LINK: City Invites More Schools to Try Diversity Initiatives (WNYC)

How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends