Sachs Lecture on May 3rd: Action! Equity and Social Justice | Teachers College Columbia University

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Sachs Lecture on May 3rd: Action! Equity and Social Justice

Mary M. Atwater, Professor, Department of Mathematics and Science Education at the University of Georgia
Mary M. Atwater, Professor, Department of Mathematics and Science Education at the University of Georgia
Teachers need to engage learners in understanding natural phenomena in ways that will enable them to change lives for the better and be involved in STEM-related careers if they so choose.  But “better” means different things to different people, and "quality science" may not mean “standardized science” if the latter does not lead to equity and social justice.

On Wednesday May 3rd at 4 p.m., in 136 Thompson Hall, Professor Mary M. Atwater of the University of Georgia will lead an interactive conversation addressing the importance to science education of different voices from different cultures speaking different languages. Atwater's premise is that because teachers are among the most influential factors in learners’ lives, any discussion of science education must include science teacher education -- including science teacher preparation, science teacher education curricula, the assessment and evaluation of preservice science teachers and teachers of science, and policies affecting science teacher education.

Published Monday, Apr. 17, 2017

Mary M. Atwater, Professor, Department of Mathematics and Science Education at the University of Georgia
Mary M. Atwater, Professor, Department of Mathematics and Science Education at the University of Georgia
Teachers need to engage learners in understanding natural phenomena in ways that will enable them to change lives for the better and be involved in STEM-related careers if they so choose.  But “better” means different things to different people, and "quality science" may not mean “standardized science” if the latter does not lead to equity and social justice.

On Wednesday May 3rd at 4 p.m., in 136 Thompson Hall, Professor Mary M. Atwater of the University of Georgia will lead an interactive conversation addressing the importance to science education of different voices from different cultures speaking different languages. Atwater's premise is that because teachers are among the most influential factors in learners’ lives, any discussion of science education must include science teacher education -- including science teacher preparation, science teacher education curricula, the assessment and evaluation of preservice science teachers and teachers of science, and policies affecting science teacher education.

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