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TC’s Rebell, in EdWeek Blog: State Judges Have “Shied Away” From Addressing Funding Disparities

Michael Rebell, Professor of Law & Educational Practice, and Executive Director of The Campaign for Educational Equity
Michael Rebell, Professor of Law & Educational Practice, and Executive Director of The Campaign for Educational Equity
On the State EdWatch blog of Education Week, TC’s Michael Rebell is quoted as saying that, while state judges have determined appropriate funding levels for public schools, they have “shied away” from dictating where school districts should invest that money to assure that high-need, under-resourced districts are getting the funding they need to show results. “It gets into this question of what expertise, what capability, courts have in getting into educational policy issues,” Rebell told EdWatch in a phone interview. Rebell, a professor of practice and founding executive director of the Campaign for Educational Equity, tracks educational funding cases across the country.

The article discusses several “pending or recently decided cases that push to broaden the meaning of ‘adequate’ and ‘equitable’ education.” It notes that in Kansas this year, for example, “lawmakers and school officials are asking deeper questions about not only how much money is spent but also where to invest that money to assure that black, Latino, and low-income students, in particular, are seeing academic results.”

To read the blog, go here.

Published Friday, Apr 14, 2017

Michael Rebell, Professor of Law & Educational Practice, and Executive Director of The Campaign for Educational Equity
Michael Rebell, Professor of Law & Educational Practice, and Executive Director of The Campaign for Educational Equity
On the State EdWatch blog of Education Week, TC’s Michael Rebell is quoted as saying that, while state judges have determined appropriate funding levels for public schools, they have “shied away” from dictating where school districts should invest that money to assure that high-need, under-resourced districts are getting the funding they need to show results. “It gets into this question of what expertise, what capability, courts have in getting into educational policy issues,” Rebell told EdWatch in a phone interview. Rebell, a professor of practice and founding executive director of the Campaign for Educational Equity, tracks educational funding cases across the country.

The article discusses several “pending or recently decided cases that push to broaden the meaning of ‘adequate’ and ‘equitable’ education.” It notes that in Kansas this year, for example, “lawmakers and school officials are asking deeper questions about not only how much money is spent but also where to invest that money to assure that black, Latino, and low-income students, in particular, are seeing academic results.”

To read the blog, go here.

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