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Samuel Abrams: NYC Policy Discourages Students from Applying to Top High Schools

Samuel E. Abrams, Director of the National Center for the Study of Privatization in Education
Samuel E. Abrams, Director of the National Center for the Study of Privatization in Education

On Chalkbeat New York, TC's Samuel Abrams says New York City's high school application process "paints an incomplete picture – one that might cause needless stress or discourage students from applying to the city’s top schools" -- because it makes schools seem more selective than they are.

Abrams, director of the National Center for the Study of Privatization in Education, has been making that point since The New York Times published a story titled, “Couldn’t get into Yale? These New York City high schools are more selective.” He considers the premise of that story — and the statistics it cites — misleading.

To see the Chalkbeat story, go here. To read Abrams’s original analysis of the Times’s story, go here.

Published Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Samuel E. Abrams, Director of the National Center for the Study of Privatization in Education
Samuel E. Abrams, Director of the National Center for the Study of Privatization in Education

On Chalkbeat New York, TC's Samuel Abrams says New York City's high school application process "paints an incomplete picture – one that might cause needless stress or discourage students from applying to the city’s top schools" -- because it makes schools seem more selective than they are.

Abrams, director of the National Center for the Study of Privatization in Education, has been making that point since The New York Times published a story titled, “Couldn’t get into Yale? These New York City high schools are more selective.” He considers the premise of that story — and the statistics it cites — misleading.

To see the Chalkbeat story, go here. To read Abrams’s original analysis of the Times’s story, go here.

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