Getting Up to Speed | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
News & Events Header

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

Getting Up to Speed: Doctoral student Brittany Chambers tells Forbes “30 Under 30” about challenges faced by black tech entrepreneurs

Brittany Chambers, Doctoral Candidate
Brittany Chambers, Doctoral Candidate
Two things run in Brittany Chambers’ family: entrepreneurship and Teachers College. Her parents operate Zen Masters, a martial arts-themed afterschool program created by her father, TC public safety officer Dennis Chambers (Ed.D. ’10; M.A. ’02; M.A. ’99). Her sister, Ashley Chambers (M.A.’16), recently opened her own music academy, Keiko Studios. And Brittany herself has designed an app to help freelancers in all fields represent their work in ways not always fully captured by traditional resumes.

But in working on that project, Brittany, who will receive her Ed.D. in Adult Learning & Leadership this May, came to a realization: She, like many other black tech entrepreneurs, has had to overcome a lack of access both to technology infrastructure and knowledge about the technology start-up process. That insight led to her dissertation, “How Black Tech Entrepreneurs Learn To Launch and Grow Their Businesses,” and that prompted Forbes “30 Under 30” to run a recent online interview with Chambers, conducted by Maryann Reid.

Chambers is mulling a book on the topic. Meanwhile, she plans to resume work on the app soon.

Published Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Brittany Chambers, Doctoral Candidate
Brittany Chambers, Doctoral Candidate
Two things run in Brittany Chambers’ family: entrepreneurship and Teachers College. Her parents operate Zen Masters, a martial arts-themed afterschool program created by her father, TC public safety officer Dennis Chambers (Ed.D. ’10; M.A. ’02; M.A. ’99). Her sister, Ashley Chambers (M.A.’16), recently opened her own music academy, Keiko Studios. And Brittany herself has designed an app to help freelancers in all fields represent their work in ways not always fully captured by traditional resumes.

But in working on that project, Brittany, who will receive her Ed.D. in Adult Learning & Leadership this May, came to a realization: She, like many other black tech entrepreneurs, has had to overcome a lack of access both to technology infrastructure and knowledge about the technology start-up process. That insight led to her dissertation, “How Black Tech Entrepreneurs Learn To Launch and Grow Their Businesses,” and that prompted Forbes “30 Under 30” to run a recent online interview with Chambers, conducted by Maryann Reid.

Chambers is mulling a book on the topic. Meanwhile, she plans to resume work on the app soon.

How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends