The Economist details the launch of a major new study co-led by TC's Kim Noble | Teachers College Columbia University

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Poverty and Children’s Brains: The Economist details the launch of a major new study co-led by TC's Kim Noble

NOBLE ENTERPRISE TC's Kim Noble is testing whether income supplements to low-income moms could positively affect young children's brain development.
NOBLE ENTERPRISE TC's Kim Noble is testing whether income supplements to low-income moms could positively affect young children's brain development.
The Economist has devoted a full-length story to next week's launch of Baby's First Years, a major study co-led by Teachers College's Kimberly Noble, Associate Professor of Neuroscience & Education, which seeks to establish causal links between parental income level and brain development in very young children.

In the study, half of a group of 1,000 low-income mothers will receive $333 per month, with no conditions for how the money should be spent, while the other half will receive $20 per month. In the story, Noble, who heads TC’s Neurocognition, Early Experience & Development (NEED) Lab, notes that while there is much evidence of the detrimental impact of poverty on child development -- including reduced language and memory skills, lower performance in school, and higher rates of ending up in jail -- no causal link has yet been established. However a previous study co-authored by Noble found strong correlations between income level and cerebral cortex size. "The hypothesis is that this steady stream of payments will make a positive difference in the cognitive and emotional development of the children whose mothers receive it," the Economist story said.

Baby's First Years is supported by $15 million in public and privately-funded grants, including a $7.8 million grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development. Noble is a faculty member in TC's Department of Biobehavioral Sciences

Read the Economist's story, Does growing up poor harm brain development?

Published Friday, May 4, 2018

NOBLE ENTERPRISE TC's Kim Noble is testing whether income supplements to low-income moms could positively affect young children's brain development.
NOBLE ENTERPRISE TC's Kim Noble is testing whether income supplements to low-income moms could positively affect young children's brain development.
The Economist has devoted a full-length story to next week's launch of Baby's First Years, a major study co-led by Teachers College's Kimberly Noble, Associate Professor of Neuroscience & Education, which seeks to establish causal links between parental income level and brain development in very young children.

In the study, half of a group of 1,000 low-income mothers will receive $333 per month, with no conditions for how the money should be spent, while the other half will receive $20 per month. In the story, Noble, who heads TC’s Neurocognition, Early Experience & Development (NEED) Lab, notes that while there is much evidence of the detrimental impact of poverty on child development -- including reduced language and memory skills, lower performance in school, and higher rates of ending up in jail -- no causal link has yet been established. However a previous study co-authored by Noble found strong correlations between income level and cerebral cortex size. "The hypothesis is that this steady stream of payments will make a positive difference in the cognitive and emotional development of the children whose mothers receive it," the Economist story said.

Baby's First Years is supported by $15 million in public and privately-funded grants, including a $7.8 million grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development. Noble is a faculty member in TC's Department of Biobehavioral Sciences

Read the Economist's story, Does growing up poor harm brain development?

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