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Academic Catalog 2017-2018

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Curriculum and Teaching

Department of - Curriculum & Teaching

Contact Information

(212) 678-3770
(212) 678-3237

Program Description

The Program in Curriculum and Teaching is designed for teachers, administrators, and other educators who: (1) have received formal professional preparation in preschool through grade twelve teaching at an accredited college or university, and/or; (2) hold, or are eligible to receive, teacher certification.

Students will have opportunities to become expert in such areas as curriculum development, school change and reform initiatives, action research and other school-based inquiry strategies, and will gain perspectives on teaching as complex intellectual activity. The overarching intention of the program is to assist educators who expect to exert leadership in their school settings and with their colleagues.

Any applicant seeking initial teacher certification should apply for the preservice, or initial certification, M.A. program in Early Childhood Education or Elementary/Inclusive Elementary Education.

Degree Summary

Curriculum and Teaching (CURR)

  • Master of Education (Ed.M.)
  • Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION-PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION (CUED-PROF)

  • Master of Arts (M.A.)

SECONDARY EDUCATION-PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION (CUSD-PROF)

  • Master of Arts (M.A.)

For a complete listing of degree requirements, please click the "Degrees" tab above

For a complete listing of degree requirements, please continue on to this program's "Degrees" section in this document

Degree Requirements

Secondary Professional Certification Program (Masters)

The MA program in secondary education (CUSD) is a 32-point program, which can lead to professional certification as a grades 7-12 teacher in New York State in the areas of English, Social Studies, Science, Technology, or Mathematics.  The program supports three shared philosophical stances underlying our long-standing tradition of preparing teachers as education leaders.  These stances include teaching as inquiry, teaching as curriculum making, and teaching for social justice.  The overarching intention of the program is to assist educators who expect to exert leadership in their school settings and with their colleagues.  With careful planning and advisement, the program can be completed in 12 months starting in the fall semester or the summer, or in 17 months if starting in January.  The program may also be taken part-time.

Prerequisite: Initial Certification in Secondary Education in one of these areas: Social Studies, Mathematics, Science, Technology, or English.

Core Courses (10 points) Students are required to take the following courses:

  • C&T 4002 Curriculum theory and history (3)
  • C&T 4005 Principles of teaching and learning (4) (includes practicum in a classroom setting)
  • C&T 4052 Designing curriculum and instruction (2-3)

Secondary Content/Pedagogy Courses (12 points)

Students are required to take 12 points of coursework in content/pedagogy in the department and program appropriate to their area of initial certification. Students will follow the content/pedagogy courses set by the particular program in one of the following areas:

  1. Social Studies
  2. Mathematics
  3. Science and Technology
  4. English

Social Context Required Courses (4 points— Only offered in the fall semester and must be taken concurrently):

  • C&T 4145 Critical perspectives in secondary education (3)
  • C&T 4502 Master’s project (1)

Social Context Selective Courses—Diversity (2-3 points)

Students choose one Selective course from the following:

  • C&T 4000 Disability in contexts (3)
  • C&T 4001 Differentiated instruction in inclusive classrooms (3)
  • C&T 4010 Immigration and curriculum (2-3)
  • C&T 4078 Curriculum and teaching in urban areas (2-3)
  • C&T 5037 Literacy, culture, and the teaching of reading (2-3)

Special Education Course Requirement (3 points required depending on previous experience)

New York State now requires that CUSD students, first enrolled at TC after February 1, 2011, must have a 3-credit stand-alone special education course which develops “the skills necessary to provide instruction that will promote the participation and progress of students with disabilities in the general education curriculum.” If you have had such a stand-alone 3-credit course in your undergraduate or other graduate studies, you have met this requirement. If you don’t, you should take C&T 4001 for 3 credits. Also, if you need to take C&T 4001, you will have to take C&T 4052: Designing Curriculum and Instruction for 2 points.

Social Context Selective Courses–General (2-3 points) Students choose one Selective course from the following:

  • C&T 4004 School change (2-3)
  • C&T 4023 Differentiated curriculum for gifted students (2-3)
  • C&T 4032 Gender, difference, and curriculum (2-3)
  • C&T 4161 The teacher: Socio-historical cultural contexts of teaching (2-3)

Elective Courses (0-3 points)           

Students have already met the College requirement of three courses outside their department, so electives may be taken inside or outside the Department of Curriculum and Teaching.

New York State Education Department (NYSED) has teacher certification requirements that are needed for program completion and graduation which are listed in the Office of Teacher Education section of the catalog.


Elementary Professional Certification Program (Masters)

The MA program in elementary education (CUED) is a 32-point program which can lead to professional certification as a grades 1-6 teacher in New York State.  The program supports three shared philosophical stances underlying our long-standing tradition of preparing teachers as education leaders.  These stances include teaching as inquiry, teaching as curriculum making, and teaching for social justice.  The overarching intention of the program is to assist educators who expect to exert leadership in their school settings and with their colleagues.  With careful planning and advisement, the program can be completed in 12 months starting in the fall semester or the summer, or in 17 months if starting in January.  The program may also be taken part-time. 

Core Courses (7 points):

  • C&T 4002  Curriculum theory and history (3)
  • C&T 4005  Principles of teaching and learning (4) (includes practicum in a classroom setting)

Content/Pedagogy Courses (12 points):

Students are required to take one course in each of the following areas:

  1. Mathematics
  2. Science or Technology
  3. Literacy
  4. Social Studies (C&T 4052, Designing curriculum and instruction (3)—Social Studies Section)

Social Context Required Courses (4 points—Only offered in the fall semester and must be taken concurrently):

  • C&T 4130 Critical perspectives in elementary education (3)
  • C&T 4502 Master’s project (1)

Social Context Selective Courses—Diversity (2-3 points) Students choose one Selective from the following:

  • C&T 4000 Disability in contexts (3)
  • C&T 4001 Differentiating instruction in inclusive classrooms (3)
  • C&T 4010 Immigration and Curriculum (2-3)
  • C&T 4078 Curriculum and teaching in urban areas (2-3)
  • C&T 4114 Multicultural approaches to teaching young children (2-3)
  • C&T 5037 Literacy, culture, and the teaching of reading (2-3)            

NOTE: New York State now requires that CUED students, first enrolled at TC after February 1, 2011, must have a 3-credit stand-alone special education course which develops “the skills necessary to provide instruction that will promote the participation and progress of students with disabilities in the general education curriculum.” If you have had such a stand alone 3-credit course in your undergraduate or other graduate studies, you have met this requirement. If you don’t, you should take C&T 4001 for 3 credits. You can use this course to meet your diversity selective requirement or take it as one of your electives.

Social Context Selective Courses—General (2-3 points) Students choose one Selective from the following:

  • C&T 4004 School change (2-3)
  • C&T 4023 Differentiated curriculum for gifted students (2-3)
  • C&T 4032 Gender, difference, and curriculum (2-3)
  • C&T 4161 The teacher: Sociohistorical, cultural contexts of teaching (2-3)
  • C&T 4615 Young children and social policy: Issues and problems (2-3)
  • C&T 4121 Early childhood teaching strategies within a social context (2-3)

Elective Courses (3-5 points)           

Students have to take at least one elective course (minimum 2 points) outside the Department of Curriculum and Teaching.

New York State Education Department (NYSED) has teacher certificaiton requirements that are needed for program completion and graduation which are listed in the Office of Teacher Education section of the catalog.


Master of Education (Masters)

The Ed.M. is an advanced master’s degree (between an M.A. and an Ed.D.) that offers a flexible program of study focusing on leadership in curriculum and teaching in a range of educational settings. This degree program offers students the opportunity to develop specialized understandings and a capacity for leadership in curriculum and pedagogy. Leadership is interpreted broadly in this program to include developing curricula, studying teaching, designing professional development, and engaging in action research, all with a focus on challenging inequalities and imagining new possibilities for education.

The Ed.M. is a 60-point program, with the possibility of transferring in 30 points from relevant graduate study. It does not lead to New York State certification as a teacher or building administrator.  Two years of teaching experience or the equivalent is a prerequisite for admission. An initial master’s degree is usually required.

The program of study for Ed.M. students is as follows:

Curriculum & Teaching Courses

A minimum of 15 points (including 9 points for core courses and 6 points for social context courses) must be taken in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching.

Core Courses (9 points)

  • C&T 4002 Curriculum theory and history (3)
  • C&T 4005 Principles of teaching and learning (3-point option only)
  • C&T 4052 Designing curriculum and instruction (3-point option only)

Social Context Courses (at least 6 points selected from the following)

  • C&T 4000 Disability in contexts
  • C&T 4001 Differentiating instruction in inclusive classrooms
  • C&T 4010 Immigration and curriculum
  • C&T 4078 Curriculum and teaching in urban areas
  • C&T 4114 Multicultural approaches to teaching young children
  • C&T 4145 Critical perspectives in secondary education
  • C&T 5037 Literacy, culture, and the teaching of reading
  • C&T 4004 School change
  • C&T 4023 Differentiated curriculum for gifted students
  • C&T 4032 Gender, difference, and curriculum
  • C&T 4121 Early childhood teaching strategies within a social context
  • C&T 4161 The teacher: Socio-historical, cultural contexts of teaching
  • C&T 4615 Young children and social policy: Issues and problems
  • C&T 5074 Curriculum and teaching policy
  • C&T 5199 (Topics vary; consult advisor)

Out-of-Department Courses

Students must also complete the College’s breadth requirement, which consists of 6 points of Teachers College courses taken outside of the Curriculum and Teaching Department.

Breadth Courses (6 to 9 points)

  • Three Teachers College courses taken out of the C&T department (minimum of 2-3 points each)
  • See the course schedule for a sample of TC courses.

Integrative Project

An Integrative Project allows students to focus their studies on particular issues related to their professional background and aspirations in the field. Students begin conceptualizing this project in the EdM Project Seminar.

C&T 5500: Ed.M. Project Seminar (1 point)

  • An initiating seminar is usually taken in the fall semester of the student’s first year of the program. The purpose of this seminar is to initiate a project that will integrate each student’s learning experiences and expand her/his knowledge and practice of leadership. The project may take a number of forms, including an article for publication, curriculum development and analysis, or action research. Students have a total of four semesters (not including summer semesters) to complete the integrative project.

 

Additional Courses

The Ed.M. program allows students considerable latitude to design a program of study in consultation with their advisor. Program advisors draw on knowledge of the many Teachers College programs and professors to help students construct a program of high interest, interdisciplinary coursework, and educational relevance. This flexibility allows Ed.M. students to select additional courses that support their unique professional goals for curriculum leadership.

 

Internships | Research

The program does not require an internship, but one can be arranged as part of the student’s program plan. Research opportunities are available at the discretion of faculty.

See FAQs for more information about the Master of Education Program.


Doctor of Education

The Department of Curriculum and Teaching offers a single Doctor of Education program with different areas of concentration. The program requires 90 points of graduate study beyond the baccalaureate, 40 points of which may be transferred from previous graduate work at other institutions, should they meet requirements of the Teachers College degree.

Applicants interested in the Ed.D. program in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching should consult the booklet, “Studying for the Ed.D. Degree in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching,” available from the Department of Curriculum and Teaching.

The concentrations within the Ed.D. program are:

  • Curriculum Studies
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Early Childhood Policy
  • Educational Leadership and School Change
  • Gifted Education
  • Literacy Education
  • Urban and Multicultural Education

Doctoral students in all concentrations may also take coursework to prepare themselves as teacher educators.

Enrollment Requirements for First-Year Ed.D. Students

Every first-year Ed.D. student in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching is required to enroll in C&T 5000, Theory and Inquiry in Curriculum and Teaching, in both the fall (6 points) and the spring (3 points) semesters of his or her first year. C&T 5000 meets for a double class session once per week in the fall and for a single class session once per week in the spring. A student can enroll for more than this minimum, but C&T 5000 must be part of his or her first-year course of study.

C&T 5000 is designed to make beginning doctoral students aware of important problems and issues in curriculum and teaching, to introduce students to methods of formulating questions and to modes of inquiry appropriate to doctoral-level research, and to build a cohesive student cohort. 

This is a rigorous course, with respect to both the quantity and sophistication of the material for which students are held responsible. The course requires a commitment of time and effort commensurate with the norms of scholarship at the doctoral level.

It is our belief that the demands placed on the students by this course will benefit students and that those who complete the course and pass the certification examination will be well prepared to continue their doctoral studies successfully through the dissertation phase. Students accepted into the Ed.D. program will receive a list of course texts with their acceptance letters so they can begin their reading early.

The basic curriculum for Ed.D. students includes:

Core Courses:

  • C&T 5000 Theory and inquiry in curriculum and teaching (6 points fall and 3 points spring, of the first year)

Research Core:

  • HUDM 4122 Probability and statistical inference (3)

Two (2) research methodology courses relevant to the student’s research interests.  Students must complete at least two of the required research core courses prior to enrolling in Dissertation Seminar. The third course may be taken concurrently with Dissertation Seminar.

At least one semester of a research seminar taught by a member of the department faculty is also required.

Research Requirements:

  • C&T 7500 Dissertation seminar in curriculum and teaching (3)

Other courses are selected in consultation with an advisor.


Application Information

For professional certification M.A. admission, please submit a resume and: (a) proof of early childhood, elementary, or secondary school teacher initial NYS certification (formerly provisional) or certification from another state or country or (b) proof that you have completed an accredited Elementary, Early Childhood or Secondary teacher preparation/student teaching program. An undergraduate GPA of 3.0 is a minimum requirement. Teaching experience is desirable but not required. (For admission requirements for the Initial certification M.A. programs, please refer to the appropriate sections of the catalog.)  

Please note that applicants are not required to take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT) to apply to any of the M.A. programs in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching. All Ed.M. students must also provide evidence of a minimum of two years of successful teaching experience. Please note that neither the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) nor the Miller Analogies Test (MAT) is required for application to the Ed.M. program in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching.

Admission to programs leading to the Ed.D. degree is determined on the basis of academic ability as evidenced by success in prior academic work and/or other measures of academic aptitude; demonstrable potential for research, field inquiry, or development activities in education; and three years of successful teaching or equivalent experience. All applicants are required to submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or Miller Analogies Test (MAT) scores that are no more than five years old and are required to submit a writing sample. The Department of Curriculum and Teaching evaluates Ed.D. applications twice per year.

All admissions materials must be received by the early or final deadlines as advertised by the College. For information on application deadlines, see the Admissions section of this bulletin.

Financial Aid

See the Office of Student Aid for more information.

Faculty List

Faculty

Lecturers

Visiting Faculty

Adjunct

Full-Time Instructors

Instructors

Professor of Education
Robinson Professor in Children's Literature
Associate Professor of Curriculum
Associate Professor of Literacy Education
Evenden Professor of Education and Vice Dean
Professor of Education
Full Time Instructor
Professor Education and Associate Dean
Maxine Greene Professor for Distinguished Contributions to Education
Professor of Education
Professor of Education
Lecturer
Professor of Education
Senior Lecturer
Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education
Instructor

For up to date information about course offerings including faculty information, please visit the online course schedule.

Course List

C&T 4002 Curriculum theory and history
The nature and design of educational activities: theory, research, and practice of curriculum design.
C&T 4005 Principles of teaching and learning
Examination of the relationships among teaching, learning, and assessment; teaching as a profession; and schools as complex social organizations.
C&T 4021 Nature and needs of gifted students

This introductory course in gifted education explores a number of issues related to the psychology and education of gifted students, including conceptions of giftedness, educational provisions for gifted students, creativity, and economically disadvantaged gifted students. Issues of race, class, gender, and disability status as they interact with the construct of giftedness are examined.

C&T 4022 Instructional models in the education of gifted students

What should gifted students learn? How can we differentiate the curriculum for gifted learners in order to meet their special needs more effectively? These and other questions will be addressed in this course devoted to the discussion, analysis, and evaluation of instructional models designed or adapted for gifted students. Emphasis will be placed on the principles of curricular differentiation and on providing an overview of a range of models designed to modify content, enhance the development of thinking skills, and enhance creativity. Issues of defining giftedness and of defensible differentiated curriculum will also be explored.

C&T 4023 Differentiated curriculum for gifted students
This course examines the characteristics of appropriate and defensible curriculum for gifted children and youth. Particular emphasis is placed on instructional strategies, curriculum theories, flexible grouping techniques, and meeting the needs of gifted learning in the regular classroom.
C&T 4024 Planning and implementing programs for gifted students

Examination of factors affecting planning and implementation of programs for the gifted, components of gifted programs, and a systems approach to program planning. Students develop written program plans for specific settings.  Issues of race, class, gender, and disability status as they affect the planning of gifted programs are examined.

C&T 4026 Exceptionality and intelligence: Theoretical approaches

Professor Borland. In this course, we explore theories of intelligence, which have served as a theoretical basis for the field of gifted education from its beginning. Starting with the work of Francis Galton in the 19th century and following through to the present day, we will critically examine and problematize such constructs as intelligence, creativity, and giftedness as well as such related topics as mental measurements.

C&T 4027 Differentiated instruction of gifted students in the heterogeneous classroom

Gifted students are present in almost every elementary, middle school, and high school classroom. The educational needs of these students can and must be met within this context. This workshop will provide an overview of curricular and instructional strategies designed to enhance the optimal development of gifted learners (and all learners) in the regular classroom. Topics will include general curricular modifications, management techniques, instructional strategies, individual learning opportunities, and outcomes and assessments. Special consideration will be given to those methods of differentiation that can be integrated readily into the learning environment of mixed-ability classrooms.

C&T 4032 Gender, difference, and curriculum

This course offers a multifaceted, interdisciplinary introduction to thinking about school curricula, policies, and practices as gendered. Gender will not be considered in isolation but as interwoven and complicated with cultural, racial, religious, class, and sexual identities, among others. The course materials will move beyond the identification of the problems to examine various efforts to create gender-sensitive curricula and programs.

C&T 4052 Designing curriculum and instruction
Application of models for designing curriculum and instruction. Students design curriculum in collaborative groups.
C&T 4121 Early childhood teaching strategies within a social context
Exploration of the teaching strategies used in early childhood education through analysis of the social contexts out of which they have arisen. Emphasis on assimilation and application of differing strategies through workshop format.
C&T 4130 Critical perspectives in elementary education

Required for all professional certification M.A. students (elementary). Examination of issues related to contemporary elementary education in the United States from the perspective of teacher as a reflective practitioner and curriculum maker, with a focus on teaching for social justice. Designed to complement students' master's action research projects.

C&T 4138 Teaching literacy in the early years
Examination of theory, research, and practice of literacy learning and teaching in the early years, including children who are English language learners and children experiencing difficulty with school literacy. Emphasis on alternative models of designing literacy curricula, selection and use of materials (including technologies), and methods of assessing and teaching decoding, spelling, fluency, text use, and comprehension.
C&T 4140 Literature for younger children
Critical study of literary trends and materials for children in prekindergarten, kindergarten, and early grades. Consideration of developmental issues and reader response theory relating to young children.
C&T 4141 Literature for older children
The course integrates theory and practice for teachers. Topics include writing development, research on writing, models for responding to and evaluating student writing, and classroom methods for teaching the writing process in elementary classrooms.
C&T 4145 Critical perspectives in secondary education
A comprehensive examination of adolescent development and learning as they relate to issues of curriculum, teaching, and learning.
C&T 4151 Teaching of writing
The course integrates theory and practice for teachers. Topics include writing development, research on writing, curriculum development, methods of teaching writing, models for responding to and evaluating student writing, and classroom methods for teaching the writing process in elementary classrooms.
C&T 4501 Teaching and learning in the multicultural, multilingual classroom

Student diversity (characterized by gender, race, ethnicity, language, special needs, and sexual orientation) is examined in relation to decisions about methodology, curriculum, instructional materials, student grouping, home-school-community relationships, and teachers' professional growth and development.

C&T 4502 Master's project

Permission required. Required for M.A. students in the Curriculum and Teaching Program. Students work to develop proposals to initiate required Master's action research project.

C&T 4615 Young children and social policy: Issues and problems
Overview of social policy towards young children as it affects classroom practice and professional goals. Situations such as child abuse, divorce and custody, student classification, and foster care are examined.
C&T 5004 School change

Major themes include state of the field regarding school change, schools as social organizations, the individual in the organization, theories of change, and implementation strategies and processes.

C&T 5037 Literacy, Culture and the Teaching of Reading

This 2-3 variable point course is a collaborative investigation into literacy as a social, cultural, and political practice. It provides opportunities for participants to unpack and re-imagine literacy learning and teaching for all students, but especially for those labeled “at risk” due to race/ethnicity, social class, nationality/language, gender, dis/ability, and sexuality. Rooted in the assumption that power circulates in culture, literacy, and education, this course looks closely at the role of power in reading texts, whether print-based, multimodal, digital, filmic, or embodied.

C&T 5042 Special topics in children's literature

Study of specific genres or curriculum issues in children's literature. Topics are announced in course schedules distributed each semester. Registration not limited to one term.

C&T 5074 Curriculum and teaching policy
Prerequisite: C&T 4004. Examination of the theoretical and political bases of curriculum and teaching policies and their influences on school organizations and teaching practices. Explores the policy-making process from policy design through implemen-tation.
C&T 5095 Memory, History and Curriculum

This seminar will explore the role that readings of the past have in contemporary life, by historicizing history itself. We will examine issues of collective memory as it relates to the assumption of a collective in the processes of constituting identities, and we will look at schooling as a central location in the production of those identities and the dissemination of particular notions linked to the past and our ability to draw lessons from it.

C&T 5506 Seminar in gifted education

This is a topical seminar that examines such issues as identification of gifted students in New York City schools, equity in gifted education, the effects of No Child Left Behind and Race to the Top, and whether gifted students are necessary for gifted education. In addition, students choose topics of interest to them as the basis for class sessions.

C&T 5800 Institute: Teaching of writing
The focus of the institute will be on the teaching of writing with the participants also working on their own writing. There will be a combination of large group presentations, small interactive sessions, and writing workshops. Separate sections will be offered for advanced participants. A partial list of topics to be covered includes: the central role of planning and curriculum development in the teaching of writing, methods for holding our students accountable for doing their best work, classroom structures that support inquiry and collaboration, and using literature to help students craft their writing. The Institute is appropriate for elementary and secondary teachers.
C&T 6100 Theory and Inquiry in Curriculum and Teaching

Required of and limited to first-year Ed.D. students in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching; must be taken in both the fall and spring semesters. Introduction to and exploration of important problems and issues in curriculum and teaching, methods of formulating questions, and modes of inquiry appropriate to doctoral-level research.

C&T 6532 Seminar in reading/language arts and related research

Permission required. Open only to advanced master's and doctoral students with a specialization in literacy or a related area who have completed recent methods courses in literacy. In-depth study and discussion of trends and issues in literacy development and instruction.

C&T 7500 Dissertation seminar in curriculum and teaching
Two semesters required of all doctoral candidates in the department unless proposal is defended in the first semester. Development of doctoral dissertations and presentation of proposals for approval.