Nutrition | Teachers College Columbia University

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Academic Catalog 2017-2018

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Nutrition

Department of - Health & Behavior Studies

Contact Information

(212) 678-3950
(212) 678-8259
Professor Isobel R. Contento

Program Description

There is an increased awareness that the quality of the diets that people habitually consume contributes to the quality of their lives. Since its founding in 1909, the Program in Nutrition at Teachers College has been a leader in developing strategies for promoting health through encouraging dietary change.

Current academic initiatives and research focus on analyzing and facilitating change in individuals and communities and on ways of modifying both personal choice and the food system within which such choices are made. In particular, faculty and students are engaged in a number of food and nutrition-related demonstrations and research projects including the cognitive and psychosocial factors influencing food choice in children, adolescents, and adults; characteristics of the dietary change process; nutritional epidemiology; issues in clinical nutrition, exercise, and nutrition; food and environment education in schools; food policy; and social, economic, and technological factors affecting the long-term sustainability of the food system. Building on its rich history, the Teachers College program aims to prepare graduates to take positions of leadership and service in nutrition counseling and education in health promotion and disease prevention programs, health agencies, hospitals, private practice, media organizations, and the workplace; to serve as teachers, faculty, or resource specialists in schools and universities; to fill a variety of planning, instructional, and administrative roles in community and public health agencies; to work in organizations that promote policy and systems change; or to serve as researchers in a variety of areas related to behavioral aspects of diet, nutrition education, nutritional epidemiology, public health nutrition, nutrition and exercise, and sustainability of the food system.

The program provides students a thorough grounding in nutrition science, nutrition education, and nutrition in clinical and public health settings. In addition, the program emphasizes the development of competencies in:

  • Designing and implementing nutrition education with individuals, groups, and communities;
  • Facilitating healthful and ecologically sustainable food choices;
  • Conducting clinical assessments and nutrition counseling;
  • Designing and implementing public health nutrition assessments and programs;
  • Understanding and applying principles of nutritional epidemiology;
  • Applying nutrition science and exercise science principles to recreational and competitive athletes;
  • Thinking critically and independently;
  • Acting collaboratively and effectively with others in organizations and communities on important issues related to food, nutrition, and sustainability of the food system; 
  • Conducting food and nutrition-related research.

Because of the breadth of its aims, the program has long admitted academically qualified students with undergraduate degrees in fields other than nutrition or the related sciences (so long as they can meet the science prerequisites), since such students often bring valuable skills and attitudes to the graduate study of nutrition.

The program puts a heavy emphasis on providing students with practical experiences in addition to traditional classroom lectures and discussions. Among the course-related educational experiences available to students are field experiences in community nutrition, planning, and teaching of nutrition sessions to selected audiences in the community, food education and gardening projects in schools, dietary analyses, and online computer activities. Supervised practicum is included in the Nutrition and Exercise Physiology degree. Students are welcome to participate in research and demonstration projects within the Program in Nutrition. These include food and environmental education programs designed for children, parents and teachers, childhood obesity prevention, and fruit and vegetable promotion in urban communities. In particular, the Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education, and Policy (www.tc.edu/cfe) conducts activities within the research, education, and policy arenas. Because of Teachers College’s location in New York City, there are also virtually unlimited opportunities for students to become involved in a variety of food/nutrition-related activities. The faculty and staff can arrange for students who have credit hours available to receive credit for such activities where appropriate.

Dietetic Internship Program

For students interested in professional certification as Registered Dietitians (R.D.), the Program sponsors a Dietetic Internship Program accredited by the Commission on Dietetic Registration. Students may begin the Internship in September each year.

The Internship is designed to bridge a student’s academic education and professional career and thus focuses on developing practitioner skills. The Internship sequence of courses (HBSV 5241-HBSV 5244) is offered on a near full-time basis requiring eleven months to complete. Students may complete the requirements for the Dietetic Internship Program concurrently while completing the requirements for the M.S. degree programs in Nutrition. Students must satisfy all academic requirements for the degree award and the Dietetic Internship. Our CADE didactic program advisor will work with students to develop an integrated plan of study and to facilitate the process. Students who successfully complete the Dietetic Internship are then eligible to take the registered dietitian certification examination.

Students may enroll for all degree programs on a full-time or part-time basis.

Degree Summary

NUTRITION EDUCATION (NUTR) 
Master of Science (M.S.)
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

NUTRITION AND PUBLIC HEALTH (NUTH)
Master of Science (M.S.)
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

COMMUNITY NUTRITION EDUCATION (NUTC)
Master of Education (Ed.M.)

NUTRITION AND EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY (NUTE)
Master of Science (M.S.)

BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION (NUBH)
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

For a complete listing of degree requirements, please click the "Degrees" tab above

For a complete listing of degree requirements, please continue on to this program's "Degrees" section in this document

Degree Requirements

Master of Science: General Requirements

The major program emphases are in the fields of Nutrition Education, Nutrition and Public Health, and Nutrition and Exercise Physiology. Students in all three M.S. programs may qualify for the Dietetic Internship through coursework for the M.S. degrees and the completion of additional academic prerequisites and requirements specifically for the Dietetic Internship. All three M.S. Nutrition degrees require the following core courses:

  • HBSV 4010 Food, nutrition, and behavior
  • HBSV 4013 Nutritional ecology
  • HBSV 4014 Community nutrition
  • HBSV 5010 Advanced nutrition I
  • HBSV 5011 Advanced nutrition II
  • HBSV 5013 Strategies for nutrition education and health behavior change
  • HBSV 5014 Analysis of current literature and research in nutrition
  • HBSV 5015 Nutritional epidemiology
  • HBSV 5033-5034 Nutrition care process and medical nutrition therapy I and II
  • HBSV 5036 Nutrition counseling
  • HBSV 5231, 5232, or 5233 Extended fieldwork in nutrition and public health, nutrition and education, or nutrition and exercise physiology
  • BBSR 5582 Research design in the movement sciences, or
  • HBSS 5040 Research methods in health and behavior studies , or
  • HBSS 6100 Measurement and program evaluation

As noted above, all three Master of Science degrees require a block of supervised fieldwork as well as a substantial integrative departmental project or thesis. Fieldwork can take place in the New York City area, in other parts of the United States, or in an international setting, depending on the interests of the student. The Dietetic Internship may satisfy the fieldwork experience requirement. Students must also submit a portfolio of their work in preparation for a Dietetic Internship.


Master of Science: Nutrition Education

Students working toward the 41- to 47-point Master of Science degree in Nutrition and Education have the option of electing courses that will especially prepare them to conduct individual and group counseling and patient education or to provide food and nutrition education in community, school, work site, health care, or mass media settings. 

In addition to the core curriculum in nutrition science, the behavioral aspects of diet, and nutrition education, students are required to take HBSV 5018 (Nutrition and human development) and HBSV 5513 (Seminar in nutrition education). They are also required to take at least two electives from a variety of other disciplines in keeping with their own goals and their area of specialization. The degree conforms to the guidelines for the training of Nutrition Education Specialists set forth by the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. 


Master of Science: Nutrition and Public Health

The Program in Nutrition and Public Health is an approved program of the Association of Faculties of Graduate Programs in Public Health Nutrition. Coursework for the 46- to 49-point Master of Science degree conforms to the recommendations of that association, so that the degree is equivalent to one offered by a school of public health.

In addition to the core in nutrition science and the behavioral sciences, coursework is required in epidemiology, program planning, and public health policy. Students are required to take HBSV 5018 unless previously taken. Other courses in public health are selected to complement the student’s previous academic background and work experiences and to take into account the student’s interests and career goals.

The Nutrition and Public Health major prepares graduates to take leadership roles in government, community, and public health agencies, carrying out a variety of planning, instructional, and administrative tasks related to health promotion and disease prevention. These include community and individual nutritional assessment and evaluation; program planning and management; coalition building; and participation in multidisciplinary teams to provide programs to meet public health needs or improve the sustainability of food systems.


Master of Science: Nutrition and Exercise Physiology

The Program in Nutrition and the Program in Applied Physiology, offer a joint course of study leading to a 54- to 57-point Master of Science degree in Nutrition and Exercise Physiology (NEP). In addition to the core courses in nutrition, students are required to take a core of courses in applied physiology. The program prepares students to provide individual counseling and group education in nutrition and exercise and to design and implement exercise and nutrition programs in weight control centers, work sites, fitness centers and with Olympic, professional, collegiate, or high school athletic teams as well as health centers, community centers, and hospitals.


Master of Education: Community Nutrition Education

The program of study is for the 60-point Master of Education degree in Community Nutrition Education includes additional coursework in advanced nutrition and permits stronger emphases in the behavioral sciences, community assessment and planning, and education. A community-based, research, or other integrative project is required.


Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

The Doctor of Education is offered in two areas of specialization: Nutrition Education and Nutrition and Public Health. 

With the increasing appreciation of the importance of nutrition for health promotion and disease prevention and the widespread interest in the safety and sustainability of the food system, there is a need for highly qualified nutrition professionals who are able to develop appropriate policies and programs. The two doctoral specializations prepare graduates for a variety of leadership positions in policy-making, education, and administration in schools and colleges/universities, in media organizations, hospitals, the workplace, and in government, community and public health, and other service agencies as well as to serve as faculty members in colleges and universities. The program’s goal is to turn out graduates capable of (a) initiating needed action and responding positively and creatively to the clearly inevitable changes of the coming decades in the physical, intellectual, and political environments in which the food, health, and educational systems operate and (b) conducting research and evaluation studies using appropriate designs and data collection and analysis methods.   

The Nutrition Education specialization focuses on leadership roles in many settings, such as colleges and universities, health promotion and disease prevention programs, voluntary health agencies, government and international agencies, businesses, hospitals, and food advocacy organizations, where they work with individuals, groups and communities, and serve as faculty members, program developers, and evaluation and research specialists. 

The Nutrition and Public Health specialization focuses on leadership roles in colleges and universities and in government, community, health care, and public health agencies, carrying out a variety of tasks related to health promotion and disease prevention. These include community and individual nutritional assessment and evaluation; program planning and management; coalition building; participation in multidisciplinary health teams to provide programs to meet public needs; and conducting research and evaluation studies. 

Admissions Requirements

Admission to the Ed.D. program involves completing the application form available online and submitting all regular admission materials, such as transcripts from all institutions attended, three letters of recommendation, GRE scores, personal statement, and a writing sample, which can be a thesis or substantial paper.

Program of Study

The general requirements for the Doctor of Education include a minimum of 90 graduate credits, of which at least 45 must be taken under Teachers College registration. Overall, students will be expected to develop competence in nutrition science, behavioral science, methods of empirical research and data analysis, critical thinking and analysis, and broad areas of scholarship, in addition to developing special skills and knowledge appropriate to their chosen degree in nutrition education or public health nutrition. Students will also be expected to pass a certification examination, usually after the completion of 60 points and Research Seminar in Nutrition (HBSV 6550-6551), and to conduct original research that culminates in the production of a dissertation.

Students will be expected to take courses in the following categories: 

  1. Major field and specialization: 50-60 points
  2. Research and evaluation: 12-18 points
  3. Broad and basic areas of professional scholarship: 15-24 points

The specific courses selected, will depend on the student’s particular background, interests, and goals. In consultation with a faculty advisor, students should develop a program plan early in their course of study to provide a rational basis for their course selection. (Visit the website for the Program in Nutrition for more detailed descriptions of the doctoral degree requirements.)


Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The increasing prevalence of chronic disease and obesity worldwide has added urgency to the need for qualified researchers trained in understanding the complex interaction of biology, environment, and personal behavior, as well as skilled in the development of interventions to potentially attenuate the rapidly rising rates of obesity and chronic diseases, such as diabetes in both adults and children. 

The program prepares scholars to conduct research on the critical issues related to:

  • determinants of health behaviors related to nutrition and to physical activity;
  • relationships among food- and nutrition-related behaviors and health outcomes using techniques of behavioral epidemiology;
  • design and implementation of theory-based behavioral nutrition and physical activity interventions
  • methodological considerations in the design and evaluation of interventions.

There are three specializations:

  1. Behavioral Nutrition
  2. Nutritional Epidemiology
  3. Nutrition and Physical Activity

The graduates from this program will be leaders who will assume professorial and research roles in universities and colleges within departments of nutrition epidemiology, foods and nutrition, and physical activity, as well as assume research roles in centers for research on behavioral aspects of obesity, chronic disease prevention, and health promotion. Thus, the program aims to prepare researchers with basic and applied behavioral skills within an educational context.

Admission Requirements

Admission to the Ph.D. program involves completing the application form available online and submitting all regular admission materials, such as transcripts from all institutions attended, three letters of recommendations, and writing sample, which can be a thesis, substantial paper, or published article.

The student should have a master’s degree in nutrition or a closely related discipline from an accredited institution, along with the necessary prerequisite undergraduate courses in general, organic and biochemistry, nutrition and statistics, and human physiology. Admissions will be based on grades, GRE scores, letters of recommendation, personal statement, and an appropriate match between the applicant’s interests, the research work of the Ph.D. faculty, and funding availability.  The student will generally be expected to be full-time and to work on ongoing research projects of the faculty.

Program of Study

The general requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy include a minimum of 75 graduate credits, of which at least 45 must be taken under Teachers College registration.

For the Ph.D., the total classroom course requirement is 45-51 credits, including prior master’s degree work and 24-30 credits (advanced topical seminars, research seminar and dissertation advisement) devoted to research-related courses and activities. Students will also be expected to pass a certification examination and an advanced seminar and to write a dissertation.

Students will be expected to take courses in the following categories:

  1. Core courses: 33 points
  2. Courses to develop depth within each specialization: 15-21 points
  3. Research preparation: 21-27 points

The specific courses selected will depend on the student’s particular background, interests and goals. In consultation with a faculty advisor, students should develop a program plan early in their course of study to provide a rational basis for their course selection.

Research Training and Apprenticeship

The primary modality for training for Ph.D. students is working with their sponsor on some ongoing research project. Students will work closely with one faculty member on an ongoing research project to gain practical experience in the development of study instruments, intervention protocols, data collection, data management and analysis, manuscript preparation and submission, and presentation of results at relevant scientific meetings. During their first year after completing basic core coursework, students will also participate in two semester-long part-time internships with other Columbia research labs to gain additional research perspectives. Visit the website for the Program in Nutrition for more detailed descriptions of the Ph.D. requirements.


Application Information

The Nutrition Program has ongoing admissions and will review applications throughout the year. Preference in scholarship awards will be for those applicants who meet a February 1 deadline. The GRE General Test is required for all degrees. A writing sample is required for doctoral applicants, preferably a master’s thesis, course paper, or published article.

For full admittance, applicants must also provide evidence of completion of prerequisite courses, including introductory nutrition, statistics, general and organic chemistry with labs, biochemistry (requiring organic chemistry as a prerequisite), and two semesters of human physiology with labs. Introductory nutrition, biochemistry, and human physiology must have been taken within five years with a grade of B or better. Courses in food science and in food management and a course in microbiology are also required for students wishing to become registered dietitians.

Students in Nutrition may also complete a Dietetic Internship option accredited by the Commission on Dietetic Registration. Applicants who wish to complete the Dietetic Internship (DI) option must submit an application through the centralized dietetic internship application system (DICAS). Applications are due February 15th each year for a September start date. The DI program participates in the computer matching system for dietetic internship through D & D Digital systems. (See Nutrition website for more information). Applicants to the DI must apply and be fully admitted to the M.S. program. For students who do not have a bachelor’s degree that satisfies DPD, the needed coursework can be completed through a combination of undergraduate courses and master’s courses. Our academic program advisor will work with students to develop an integrated plan of study and to facilitate the process.

Admission to the doctoral programs is based upon the applicant’s academic and work record. Normally a student will be formally admitted to the doctoral program only after completion of coursework equivalent to the 40-50-point Master of Science degrees or the 60-point Master of Education degree.

Faculty List

Faculty

Lecturers

Visiting Faculty

Adjunct

Full-Time Instructors

Instructors

Instructor
Part Time Instructor
Mary Swartz Rose Professor of Nutrition and Education
Adjunct Associate Professor
Adjunct Professor
Instructor
Executive Director/Associate Research Professor
Interim Hourly
Adjunct Professor
Dietetic Internship Director
Lecturer
Associate Professor of Human Nutrition, Ella McCollum Vahlteich Endowment

For up to date information about course offerings including faculty information, please visit the online course schedule.

Course List

HBSV 4000 Introduction to nutrition

(Course is offered to non-majors and to those desiring admission to the Program in Nutrition and to the Dietetic Internship Program.) The course provides an overview of the science of nutrition and its relationship to health promotion and disease prevention. The primary focus is on the essential macro- and micronutrients - their chemical structures, food sources, digestion and absorption, metabolism, storage, and excretion. Students analyze the nutritional quality of their own food intake and develop the knowledge and skills to estimate their daily caloric requirements and nutrient needs using tools such as Dietary Reference Intakes, My Plate, and Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

HBSV 4010 Food, nutrition and behavior
For nonmajors and majors. A study of physiological, psychological, and socio-cultural factors that affect eating behaviors and the development of individual and cultural food patterns. Topics include the chemical senses, why we like sweet, salt, and fat; self-regulation of what and how much we eat; effect of early experiences with food; food and mood; interaction of food and culture through history; eating, cooking, and time use trends; meat meanings; psychosocial and cultural factors in food choice.
HBSV 4011 Women and weight, eating problems and body image
An intense, two-week short course held in the summer. This course for students and practitioners examines the psychological, sociological, physiological, and nutritional issues related to weight, eating disorders, body image and cultural messages as they relate to women. Potential interventions are also examined. The issues will be discussed using case material, films, and the current research literature. Taught by a licensed psychologist and a nutritionist.
HBSV 4013 Nutritional ecology

A course for non-majors and majors. Nutrition and food as viewed from a global, ecological perspective. Topics include food/population problems and food aid, food product development and promotion here and abroad, energy and food relationships, food safety and the changing American diet, organic agriculture and natural food, biotechnology, and other topics as appropriate.

HBSV 4014 Community nutrition

This course examines and evaluates food assistance and safety net programs in the United States and explores the policies, history, and context that lead to unequal access to healthy food. The course includes broad thought-provoking readings as well as working "on the ground": assessing supermarkets and opportunities for safe walking and biking; volunteering at a food pantry; and visiting an urban agriculture site. Students outside the Program in Nutrition are welcome, with permission from the instructor.

HBSV 4150 Sports nutrition
For nonmajors only. A practical course designed to assist health professionals give the most accurate and up-to-date information to active people to help them improve health and performance. Integration of principles of nutrition and exercise physiology and application to exercising individuals. Topics for discussion include energy expenditure, fuel substrate metabolism, specific nutrient needs, hydration, and weight issues for exercising individuals and athletes.
HBSV 4902 Research and independent study in nutrition education

Permission required. Master's degree students undertake research and independent study under the direction of a faculty member.

HBSV 5010 Advanced nutrition I

In-depth review of current knowledge and research on biochemical and physiological aspects of energy metabolism, carbohydrates, lipids and lipid metabolism, and proteins; regulation of intake and impact on health and disease.

HBSV 5011 Advanced nutrition II
In-depth review of current knowledge and research on the biochemical and physiological aspects of vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients; applications to diet.
HBSV 5013 Strategies for nutrition education and health behavior change

Understanding and application of theoretical frameworks from the behavioral sciences and education to design and deliver food and nutrition education and physical activity promotion to various groups and to facilitate the adoption of healthful behaviors. Includes both didactic and field practice components.

HBSV 5014 Analysis of current literature and research in nutrition
Critical examination and evaluation of current controversies and issues in nutrition and food. Topics are reviewed and discussed in depth. Students learn how to analyze the medical and layperson literature concerning such topics as dietary fat and disease, calcium and osteoporosis, fruit/vegetables and cancer, weight loss regimens, supplements and alternative therapies.
HBSV 5015 Nutritional epidemiology
Study of methods for assessing food and nutrient intake, energy expenditure, and body composition and for evaluating nutritional status of individuals and communities from clinical assessments, dietary intakes, and behavioral evaluation.
HBSV 5018 Nutrition and human development
This course examines the physiologic changes and nutritional needs during pregnancy, fetal development, infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Special attention is paid to promoting positive pregnancy outcomes for both mother and baby, fetal metabolic programming, breast feeding versus formula feeding, introduction of solid foods to infants, preventing and managing food allergies, coping with picky eating, maintaining a healthy feeding relationship between caregiver and child, promoting nutritional health in children and adolescents, and preventing health and dietary problems (including eating disorders) in children and adolescents.
HBSV 5033 Nutrition care process and medical nutrition therapy I

Through this 2-course sequence, students gain the knowledge, professional attitudes and skills required to effectively assess and manage the nutritional needs of acutely, critically, and chronically ill individuals. Pathophysiology of disease and resultant nutritional implications are examined through a variety of case studies. The Nutrition Care Process, which includes nutrition screening, assessment, diagnosis, intervention, monitoring, and evaluation, is the tool through which students learn evidence-based adaptation of diets and lifestyles in the therapeutic management of disease. All the while, the course provides a medical vocabulary that enables students to communicate with members of a healthcare team.

HBSV 5034 Nutrition care process and medical nutrition therapy II
Dr. Sporny. Through this 2-course sequence, students gain the knowledge, professional attitudes and skills required to effectively assess and manage the nutritional needs of acutely, critically, and chronically ill individuals. Pathophysiology of disease and resultant nutritional implications are examined through a variety of case studies. The Nutrition Care Process, which includes nutrition screening, assessment, diagnosis, intervention, monitoring and evaluation, is the tool through which students learn evidence-based adaptation of diets and lifestyles in the therapeutic management of disease. All the while, the course provides a medical vocabulary that enables students to communicate with members of a healthcare team.
HBSV 5036 Nutrition counseling

This course focuses on providing students with an understanding of client-centered counseling models and practicing a variety of essential skills: nonverbal, active listening, goal assessment, motivational interviewing, and group counseling. Special fee: $20.

HBSV 5231 Extended fieldwork in nutrition and education, nutrition and public health, and nutrition and exercise physiology

A block of supervised field experience required of all degrees. Fieldwork is taken near completion of coursework.

HBSV 5232 Extended fieldwork in nutrition and education, nutrition and public health, and nutrition and exercise physiology

A block of supervised field experience required of all degrees. Fieldwork is taken near completion of coursework.

HBSV 5233 Extended fieldwork in nutrition and education, nutrition and public health, and nutrition and exercise physiology

A block of supervised field experience required of all degrees. Fieldwork is taken near completion of coursework.

HBSV 5241 Dietetic internship in nutrition: Module I

Internship in service settings in metropolitan New York, Rockland and Westchester counties, and Southern Connecticut. It includes experiences in clinical nutrition, community nutrition, food service management, and research in dietetics. Cumulative experience totals 1200 hours. Malpractice/personal liability insurance, health insurance, lab coat, and physical exam required. Special fee: $150

HBSV 5242 Dietetic internship in nutrition: Module II

Internship in service settings in metropolitan New York, Rockland and Westchester counties, and Southern Connecticut. It includes experiences in clinical nutrition, community nutrition. food service management, and research in dietetics.  Cumulative experience totals 1200 hours. Malpractice/personal liability insurance, health insurance, lab coat, and physical exam required. Special fee: $150

HBSV 5243 Dietetic Internship in nutrition: Research and Independent Practice

Internship in service settings in metropolitan New York, Rockland and Westchester counties, and Southern Connecticut. It includes experiences in research in dietetics, clinical nutrition, community nutrition, and food service management. Cumulative experience totals 1200 hours. Malpractice/personal liability insurance, health insurance, lab coat, and physical exam required. Special fee: $20

HBSV 5244 Dietetic Internship in nutrition: Internship in food service
Internship in service settings in metropolitan New York, Rockland and Westchester counties, and Southern Connecticut. It includes experiences in food service management. Cumulative experience totals 200 hours. Malpractice/personal liability insurance, health insurance, lab coat, and physical exam required. Instructor: Toby Amidor
HBSV 5333 Practicum in community service
Practical experiences in community, food, and nutrition programs.
HBSV 5513 Seminar in nutrition education: Theory and applications
An in-depth examination of the use of current theories and research in the design, implementation, and evaluation of nutrition education interventions. Course is designed to supplement topics covered in HBSV 5013. Required of nutrition education master’s and doctoral students. Students may register for more than one semester.
HBSV 5593 Nutrition in exercise and sport

Discussions of interactions between exercise and nutrition as applied to health and fitness. Controversial topics emphasized. Majors in nutrition are eligible to enroll during their second year of study. (See also section on the interdisciplinary Applied Physiology and Nutrition degree program in this catalog.)

HBSV 5902 Guided study in nutrition
Permission required. Opportunity for advanced students to investigate areas of special interest in nutrition.
HBSV 6550 Research seminar in nutrition
Required of all Ed.M. and Ed.D. candidates. Discussion of current research issues and student projects. Stu-dents may register for more than one semester.
HBSV 6551 Research seminar in nutrition
Required of all Ed.M. and Ed.D. candidates. Discussion of current research issues and student projects. Students may register for more than one semester.
HBSV 6902 Research and independent study in nutrition
Permission required. Open to matriculated doctoral students. Research and independent study under faculty direction.
HBSV 7502 Dissertation seminar in nutrition
Development of doctoral dissertations and presentation of plans for approval.
HBSV 8900 Dissertation advisement in nutrition
Advisement on doctoral dissertations. Fee to equal 3 points at current tuition rate for each term. For requirements, see catalog on continuous registration for Ed.D. degree.