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REIMAGINING EDUCATION: TEACHING AND LEARNING IN RACIALLY DIVERSE SCHOOLS

Monday, July 17, 2017 - Thursday, July 20, 2017
8:30 am - 3:30 pm

Teachers College, Columbia University
525 West 120th Street, New York, New York

 

Overview

American public schools have entered a new demographic era. Today more than half of all children enrolled in K-12 public schools are students of color. Schools, both urban and suburban, are becoming increasingly diverse. But diversity alone does not lead to integration.

To create truly integrated schools, educators need to embrace new and innovative ways to engage students and prepare them for a global society. We need to reimagine teaching and learning.

Designed for educators, policy makers, parents, and all stakeholders in K-12 schools, the Reimagining Education Summer Institute will explore the opportunities and challenges of creating and sustaining racially, ethnically and socio-economically integrated schools. The institute will feature presentations and panels, interactive workshops, and deep dialogue sessions led by curriculum and pedagogy experts from Teachers College and around the nation.

In the safe, supportive environment of the institute, you’ll connect with people from all across the country who are committed to integrated schools and classrooms. And you’ll come away with strategies, resources, and an action plan uniquely tailored to your school.

 

Read Chalkbeat's interview with TC's Amy Stuart Wells on fostering school diversity and integration

Click here for video highlights of the 2016 Reimagining Education Institute

Join Us

Speakers

(more to come)

Schedule

Why Reimagining?

8:00-8:30
Continental Breakfast and Registration

8:30-9:00
Welcome and Overview of the Institute

9:00-10:15
Plenary Sessions
“Reclaiming an African American Pedagogical Model: Lessons for Real Integrated Schools Today”
Vanessa Siddle Walker, Emory University
Respondent: Michelle Knight-Manuel, Teachers College, Columbia University

The Summer Institute’s Keynote Address will be delivered by renowned historian and educator Vanessa Siddle Walker of Emory University. Drawing on her groundbreaking historical research on African American teachers in de jure segregated schools, Dr. Walker will provide strategies for engaging all students that will help them perform to their highest potential.

10:15-10:30
Break

10:30-12:00
Facilitated Small-Group Dialogue Sessions

12:00-12:45
Lunch (Box Lunch Provided)

12:45-2:05
Choice of Workshops

2:05-2:20
Break

2:20-3:30
Plenary Sessions
“Metro Migrations”
Amy Stuart Wells, Teachers College, Columbia University

“Laundry City”
EPIC Theatre Ensemble

3:30-3:45
Break

3:45 onward
TC Graduate Class Meetings/Optional Activities

Racial and Cultural Literacies

8:00-8:30
Continental Breakfast and Registration 

8:30-8:40
Welcome and Overview of the Institute

8:40-10:15
Plenary Sessions
“When Celebrating Diversity Isn’t Enough: The Need for Racial and Cultural Literacies in Our Schools”
Ali Michael, University of Pennsylvania
Detra Price-Dennis, Teachers College, Columbia University
Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz, Teachers College, Columbia University

“Becoming Culturally Sustaining Educators: Teaching and Learning for Justice in a Changing World”
Django Paris, Michigan State University

10:15-10:30
Break

10:30-12:00
Facilitated Small-Group Dialogue Sessions

12:00-12:45
Lunch (Box Lunch Provided)

12:45-2:05
Choice of Workshops

2:05-2:20
Break

2:20-3:30
Plenary Sessions
“Liberation Literacies Pedagogy”
Jamila Lyiscott, Teachers College, Columbia University
Cyphers for Justice

3:30-3:45
Break

3:45 onward
TC Graduate Class Meetings/Optional Activities

Equity Pedagogy

8:00-8:30
Continental Breakfast and Registration 

8:30-8:40
Welcome and Overview of the Institute

8:40-10:15
Plenary Sessions
“The Pedagogy of Revolutionary Love Across the Curriculum”
Ansley Erickson, Teachers College, Columbia University
Felicia Moore Mensah, Teachers College, Columbia University
Ernest Morrell, Teachers College, Columbia University
Erica Walker, Teachers College, Columbia University
Chris Emdin, Teachers College, Columbia University

“No More Culturally Irrelevant Teaching!: On the Promise and Possibility of Culturally Relevant Teaching”
Mariana Souto-Manning, Teachers College, Columbia University
Jessica Martell, Central Park East II
Carmen Llerena, PS 75
Abigail Salas, PS 75

10:15-10:30
Break

10:30-12:00
Facilitated Small-Group Dialogue Sessions

12:00-12:45
Lunch (Box Lunch Provided)

12:45-2:05
Choice of Workshops

2:05-2:20
Break

2:20-3:30
Plenary Sessions
Chris Emdin, Teachers College, Columbia University
Science Genius

3:30-3:45
Break

3:45 onward
TC Graduate Class Meetings/Optional Activities
“Stolen Education”
Film Screening with Filmmaker Enrique Alemán

Culturally Sustaining Leadership

8:00-8:30
Continental Breakfast and Registration 

8:30-8:40
Welcome and Overview of the Institute

8:40-10:15
“Reimagining Leadership: Lessons Learned From Unspoken Histories”
Sonya Douglass Horsford, Teachers College, Columbia University
Enrique Alemán, Jr., University of Texas at San Antonio

In this session, Sonya Douglass Horsford, Associate Professor of Education Leadership, Teachers College, and Enrique Alemán, Professor & Chair, Educational Leadership & Policy Studies, University of Texas at San Antonio, will engage in a conversation about the power of culturally sustaining leadership within the context of today’s separate and unequal schools. Contextualized by the historical trauma experienced by communities of color in the U.S. through (1) overwhelming physical or psychological violence, (2), segregation and/or displacement, (3) economic deprivation, and (4) cultural dispossession, as illustrated in Alemán’s film, Stolen Education, Horsford and Alemán will discuss the inspiration for the film and its connections to the everyday practice of school and system leaders amid the larger social, political, and economic forces of resegregation, gentrification, and displacement.

“A Community of Leaders: Sharing Responsibility for Cultural Proficiency in Cambridge, MA”
Jeffrey M. Young, Teachers College, Columbia University
Manuel Fernandez, Cambridge Street Upper School

This session will feature a conversation about culturally proficient leadership between Jeffrey M. Young, Professor of Practice in Education Leadership at TC and former Superintendent of Schools in Cambridge, MA, and Manuel J. Fernandez, Principal of the Cambridge Street Upper School (grades 6-8), also in Cambridge, MA. They will discuss the inspiration for and importance of this work as Principal Fernandez integrated this effort throughout his school, paying special attention to engaging a variety of stakeholders, cultivating allies, managing resistance, and sustaining personal motivation to exercise leadership in promoting and supporting schools and communities as socially just places which effectively serve the educational needs of all cultural groups.

They will touch on related topics such as helping teachers develop a deep understanding of their own racial and cultural identities, as well as the ways in which their beliefs, values and behaviors affect classroom and school-wide practice as part of a larger effort to improve students' academic and social success.

10:15-10:30
Break

10:30-12:00
Facilitated Small-Group Dialogue Sessions

12:00-12:45
Lunch (Box Lunch Provided) 

12:45-2:05
Choice of Workshops

2:05-2:20
Break

2:20-3:30
Plenary Sessions
Presentation of Action Plans
IntegrateNYC4Me

3:30-3:45
Break

3:45 onward
TC Graduate Class Meetings

Curriculum

Participants will examine the many ways in which race and ethnicity matter in teaching and learning, and explore how to design educational settings in which all students can learn from each other.

  • Learn to foster the educational benefits of diversity for all students
  • Enhance students’ understanding, empathy, and ability to learn from people of diverse backgrounds
  • Develop strategies to tap into insights and knowledge of diverse groups of students
  • Facilitate dialogues among students, staff and parents about issues of race
  • Understand racial identities within racially diverse contexts
  • Develop culturally relevant and culturally sustaining curriculum and pedagogy
  • Improve achievement outcomes for all students
  • Build community and engage parents
  • Frame diverse schools as the most desirable schools for the 21st century
  • Promote the educational and social advantages of diverse schools
  • Create a plan to bring this knowledge back to your own schools and communities

Teacher Leadership Strand: Catalyzing Lasting Change in Schools

Do you want to create a movement in your school to transform teaching and learning for students of all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds? Do you want to catalyze positive change that is sustainable over the long term? Do you want to cultivate a school culture that fosters teacher voice and professional growth? In three sessions led by Felicia Moore Mensah of Teachers College, Columbia University, teachers will learn essential skills and practices of successful teacher leaders, including how to develop an action plan, how to identify and surmount challenges, and how to build a community of stakeholders committed to lasting improvements. Teachers will come away prepared to return to their schools and lead change efforts that will create vibrant, equitable classrooms for the future. The Teacher Leadership Strand, offered at no extra charge to participants, begins with a Monday workshop followed by two 60-minute after hours sessions on Tuesday and Wednesday. For more information, please email ReimagineEd@tc.columbia.edu.

Facilitated Small-Group Dialogue Session

The facilitated small-group dialogue session is a space for participants to deepen their learning through group dialogue and individual reflection. Similar to school homeroom, each group comprises diverse participants who meet daily. Through activities facilitated by Teachers College doctoral students, participants explore how insights gained from workshops and plenaries will actively inform their practice in education. Participants will be encouraged to engage in critical conversations in order to challenge assumptions and spark innovation for their work moving forward. By Thursday, participants will emerge with a plan to put new learning into action in their unique professional context.

Register

 

Participants in the Institute can either earn:

Professional Development Credits 
(CEUs or CTLEs)

AND/OR

 3 Graduate Course Credits

AND/OR

New in 2017: Day passes!


Participants can earn three continuing education units (CEUs), or 30 New York State continuing teacher and leader education hours (CTLEs), or three graduate course credits. Single-day passes are also available.

To register for the Summer Institute and receive CEU or CTLE credit, or for a single-day pass, visit the Continuing Professional Studies Summer Institute Page.

For a 10 percent discount on groups of two or more, or special pricing for New York City public school teachers and returning participants, please contact cps@tc.columbia.edu.

To receive graduate course credits, graduate students should choose one of the following TC Summer B courses. Please contact the Office of the Registrar at registrar@tc.columbia.edu or register through the My TC portal.

Earn 3 graduate course credits by enrolling in one of three TC Summer B courses listed below:

 

EDP 4023 Issues: Reimagining Education: Policies for Effective Teaching and Learning in Racially Diverse Schools

  Amy Stuart-Wells, Teachers College, Columbia University

This course provides graduate students studying education policy a unique opportunity to listen to and engage the Summer Institute speakers and participants. The course will meet as part of the regularly-scheduled programming of the institute from Monday, July 17th to Thursday, July 20th, 9 am to 5 pm. Students will also meet once for a pre-institute meeting (either Thursday, June 22nd from 3-4:40 pm OR June 26th 5-7 pm) and once for a post-institute meeting (Tuesday, July 25th 5-7 pm) to discuss their class-specific readings and assignments related to the central themes of the Institute but tailored to a graduate course in the multidisciplinary field of education policy. This is a 3-credit course with variable credit options. This course fulfills M.A. requirements for Educational Policy and Sociology and Education Programs.

C&T 4199 004 Issues: Equity, Race, and Pedagogical Practice

  Michelle Knight-Manuel, Teachers College, Columbia University

This course will give graduate students a unique opportunity to engage with and listen to their peers, major speakers in ths field, student performers and facilitators committed to addressing equity, race, and pedagogy. In addition to participating in the Institute on Reimagining Education, students will meet once before the Institute begins to discuss their class- specific readings and assignments. The course seeks to connect student’s understandings of their racial autobiography to current/future equity pedagogies and/or research within culturally, economically, and linguistically diverse PreK-12 contexts.

C&T 5199 Cultivating Racial Literacy in Digital Spaces: Implications for Curriculum, Policy, and Classroom Practice

  Detra Price-Dennis, Teachers College, Columbia University

Are you interested in exploring what it means to be racially literate in a web 2.0 and the impact that has on curriculum, teaching, and/or policy? Examining methodological approaches researchers use to learn about race in digital spaces? Learning more about the ways youth index their racialized experiences in digital spaces; then consider how that information could influence curriculum, teaching, and/or policy? If so, this is the course for you. In recent years issues related to race, equity, access, and justice racial discourse is circulated in digital spaces has been on full display. Hashtags such as #Blacklivesmatter have indexed the ways people of color experience race in a variety of social contexts. This course will explore how the construct of race operates as a discursive practice in digital spaces to contest inequities, disrupt single stories, celebrate culture, and (re)imagine how digital spaces can support inquiry into race in K-12 schools. This course is designed in conjunction with Teachers College’s new Summer Institute, Reimagining Education: Teaching and Learning in Racially Diverse Schools.

C&T 5199 Reimagining Education: School Desegregation, Racial Literacies, and Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

  Mariana Souto-Manning, Teachers College, Columbia University

This course is designed to enable C&T students to take a class (2-3 credits) while participating in Teachers College’s new Summer Institute, Reimagining Education: Teaching and Learning in Racially Diverse Schools. The 4-day Institute will assist and support educators in the process of rethinking schooling, teaching, and learning for a more racially, ethnically and socioeconomically diverse student body. This course will give C&T students a unique opportunity to listen to and engage with major speakers, performers and facilitators committed to addressing issues of in/equity within our public (pre)schools, focusing on school desegregation, racial literacy, and culturally relevant pedagogy. In addition to participating in the Institute, C&T students will meet for two hours each day (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, 3:45-5:45pm) to discuss their class-specific readings and assignments related to the central themes of the Institute but tailored to a graduate course in curriculum and teaching.

CCPJ 5199 Reimagining Education, Reimagining Youth Counseling: A Week-Long Summer Intensive

  Laura Smith, PhD, Teachers College, Columbia University

In this class, graduate students in psychology can enroll in a 3-unit class that coincides with Teachers College's new summer institute, Reimagining Education. CCPJ 5199 gives students a unique opportunity to listen to and engage with major speakers, performers, and facilitators committed to addressing issues of inequality within school settings. In addition to participating in the institute, students will meet with their own course instructor to discuss class-specific readings and assignments related to the central themes of the institute but tailored to graduate coursework related to counseling practice with young people, especially in educational settings. CCPJ 5199 is for you if you are interested in creative, culturally-informed practice with young people, or interested in schools and other educational settings as sites of practice, and a masters- or doctoral-level graduate student in a psychology program.

More courses to come.

For more information, contact: Tracy Vadakumchery and Ann LoBue at ReimagineEd@tc.columbia.edu; Amy Deiner at cps@tc.columbia.edu or call (212) 678-8311.

View the Summer Institute on the Continuing Professional Studies site.

See the 2016 conference website