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TC Today Spring/Summer 2017

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Campaign Update: “Be There for Tomorrow”

LAB PARTNERS Edmund Adjapong (right, Ph.D. '17) never imagined studying science, let alone teaching it. Then his ninth-grade science teacher, Christopher Emdin -- today, a TC faculty member -- engaged his students through hip-hop. Edmund teaches science in his old neighborhood and recently completed his dissertation on further adapting classroom hip-hop techniques.

Support our students. Make your mark on our Campaign – and on the future

A letter from Suzanne M. Murphy, Vice President, Development & External Affairs

The impact of Teachers College’s historic $300 million Campaign, Where the Future Comes First, has extended to every area of the College, creating new programs and strengthening existing ones; supporting groundbreaking research in education, psychology and health; and enabling us to bring our campus into the 21st century while preserving its beauty and historic legacy.

HOW TO MAKE A SCHOLARSHIP GIFT

CREATE a named endowed scholarship. TC is making available a select number of dollar-for-dollar matches of any gift of $50,000 to $250,000. Learn about TC’s match! Email Linda Colquhoun or call 212-678-3679.

DONATE to an existing scholarship honoring TC’s distinguished faculty and renowned programs.

SUPPORT an Annual Fund Scholar or make a gift to the TC Fund for financial aid.

To all who have already contributed financially or given the gift of your time, energy and ideas: Thank you for standing with us and believing in what we do.

To those who may be pondering your involvement: The Campaign isn’t over, and there is a still a chance for you to put your mark on it. Teachers College is a place where you really can identify and implement ways of improving the world — and I invite you to do just that. Our faculty and students are advancing justice and serving humanity on so many fronts. They’re working to meet the needs of families displaced by the global refugee crisis. They’re fighting racism and other forms of intolerance. They’re closing the education achievement gap and reimagining schooling for an increasingly diverse student population. They’re working to mitigate the effects of poverty on physical and mental wellbeing, and on outcomes in education and life. They’re reducing gun violence by youth and improving nutrition in under-served schools and communities. They’re illuminating the importance of the arts for developing young minds.

And that’s just a small sample of the exciting and urgently needed work taking place at TC. Whatever your interest or issue, and whatever your cultural or intellectual background, you can help build a better world by joining forces with Teachers College.

RESTORING COMMUNITY As an undergraduate in Turkey, Ceren Sönmez (left) studied engineering -- but her real interest was in people. Now she coordinates a project guided by TC's Lena Verdeli to make group interpersonal therapy (IPT) central to the mental health system in Lebanon, which has absorbed millions of Syrian refugees.
RESTORING COMMUNITY As an undergraduate in Turkey, Ceren Sönmez (left) studied engineering -- but her real interest was in people. Now she coordinates a project guided by TC's Lena Verdeli to make group interpersonal therapy (IPT) central to the mental health system in Lebanon, which has absorbed millions of Syrian refugees.
Right now, though, there is one area where we need to step up our efforts: Creating scholarships to support our talented students, who represent the future not only for TC but the world. Regardless of how you want to “fund your passion,” the key to the success of any program is the students, who work side by side with our professors and then, as alumni, carry forth and build on their ideas. And thanks to a generous donor, we're offering a select number of dollar-for-dollar matches on $50,000-$250,000 gifts to create or enhance an endowed scholarship fund. So support TC students now!

“Thanks to a generous donor, we're offering a select number of dollar-for-dollar matches on $50,000-$250,000 gifts to create or enhance an endowed scholarship fund. So support TC students now!”
—Suzanne M. Murphy

GIVE NOW

Certainly we’ve made huge strides in assisting our students. The Campaign has created 150 new scholarships, including 47 during the past year alone. Overall, TC has increased financial aid by 108 percent over the past decade. To help you understand why, despite those are great numbers, we must do so much more, let me introduce just a few of the students who are benefiting from that support.

Ceren Sönmez grew up in Turkey and studied engineering as an undergraduate. She found that her real curiosity was about people — their motivations and feelings. A professor in Turkey told her that TC offered her the best chance to conduct and apply research that would make an immediate difference in people’s lives. She has since connected with Professor Lena Verdeli, Director of TC’s Global Mental Health Lab, who is the world’s foremost authority on using Group Interpersonal Therapy (IPT) to help people displaced by war, epidemic or natural disaster overcome paralyzing depression and anxiety. Now, as she completes her Ph.D. with the help of TC’s Jodi Lane Scholarship, Ceren is coordinating Professor Verdeli’s project to help restructure the entire mental health care system in Lebanon, which has absorbed a flood of refugees from Syria.

“With our funder in Canada, our partners at the University of Cambridge and, of course, the team in Lebanon, it can be very tricky to get something done within a day,” Ceren says. “But it’s a wonderful learning opportunity for me. I consider myself so lucky for being involved in this project.”

$290 million
TC has raised 97% of its $300 million Campaign goal (as of May 19, 2017)

GIVE NOW

Edmund Adjapong’s mentor is Professor Christopher Emdin, who was his ninth-grade physics teacher. “Science is a really Eurocentric discipline — there are not many people of color,” says Edmund, who just received his Ph.D. in Science Education. “So in textbooks, I never really saw pictures that reflected who I was or things I identified with.”

But when Professor Emdin used hip-hop to engage his students, Edmund got excited about science. He started college as a biochemistry major, planning to be a pharmacist, but switched to teaching because he wanted to communicate that same excitement to others who felt marginalized in the classroom. At TC, supported by the Peter Greeman Scholarship, Edmund coordinated Professor Emdin’s Science Genius Project, a competition in which students create science-themed raps, and expanding it to other countries. He also wrote a thesis on bringing specific hip-hop practices into the classroom — something that, as a sixth-grade science teacher in his old neighborhood in the Bronx, he has ample opportunity to do.

HELP IS ON THE WAY As a student of emergency medical care in Pakistan, Usama Mirza (right; M.A. '17) often felt afraid of failing. At TC he learned more about teaching general and, from Professor Mary Mendenhall, about teaching under crisis conditions. He's starting a nonprofit to teach emergency care in Pakistan's remote areas.
HELP IS ON THE WAY As a student of emergency medical care in Pakistan, Usama Mirza (right; M.A. '17) often felt afraid of failing. At TC he learned more about teaching general and, from Professor Mary Mendenhall, about teaching under crisis conditions. He's starting a nonprofit to teach emergency care in Pakistan's remote areas.
Usama Javed Mirza was inspired to attend TC by his second-grade teacher in Pakistan, Hareem Atif Khan, an alumna and former Convocation speaker who is now a TC instructor and staff developer with the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project. At TC, supported by several scholarships, Usama, who just received his master's degree in Curriculum & Teaching, worked with Professor Mary Mendenhall, a leader in studying and creating education for displaced young people around the world. Like Dr. Khan, he, too, spoke at Convocation. With his enhanced understanding of teaching, he’s launching a nonprofit that will teach villagers in remote areas of Pakistan to manage health crises and disasters.

$78.3 million
TC has raised $78.3 million in scholarships and fellowships. Help us reach our goal!

SUPPORT OUR STUDENTS

Clearly investing in our students pays off — but we need to help more students like Ceren, Edmund and Usama. To show you how your fellow alumni and TC friends are doing that, we also introduce here a photo gallery of recent scholarship supporters. We hope that they — and other donors featured in ads throughout this issue of TC Today — convey our message that TC donors come in all shapes, sizes, colors, ages and income brackets, with interests that run the gamut.

A gift to support any student is a very special thing, because it helps launch a lifetime of good works that in turn may empower many others.

A gift to support a student at TC could very well change the world. So be there for tomorrow. Join our Campaign and invest in the future, today.

SUZANNE M. MURPHY (M.ED. ’99, M.A. ’96)
VICE PRESIDENT, DEVELOPMENT & EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

Published Tuesday, May 9, 2017

LAB PARTNERS Edmund Adjapong (right, Ph.D. '17) never imagined studying science, let alone teaching it. Then his ninth-grade science teacher, Christopher Emdin -- today, a TC faculty member -- engaged his students through hip-hop. Edmund teaches science in his old neighborhood and recently completed his dissertation on further adapting classroom hip-hop techniques.

Support our students. Make your mark on our Campaign – and on the future

A letter from Suzanne M. Murphy, Vice President, Development & External Affairs

The impact of Teachers College’s historic $300 million Campaign, Where the Future Comes First, has extended to every area of the College, creating new programs and strengthening existing ones; supporting groundbreaking research in education, psychology and health; and enabling us to bring our campus into the 21st century while preserving its beauty and historic legacy.

HOW TO MAKE A SCHOLARSHIP GIFT

CREATE a named endowed scholarship. TC is making available a select number of dollar-for-dollar matches of any gift of $50,000 to $250,000. Learn about TC’s match! Email Linda Colquhoun or call 212-678-3679.

DONATE to an existing scholarship honoring TC’s distinguished faculty and renowned programs.

SUPPORT an Annual Fund Scholar or make a gift to the TC Fund for financial aid.

To all who have already contributed financially or given the gift of your time, energy and ideas: Thank you for standing with us and believing in what we do.

To those who may be pondering your involvement: The Campaign isn’t over, and there is a still a chance for you to put your mark on it. Teachers College is a place where you really can identify and implement ways of improving the world — and I invite you to do just that. Our faculty and students are advancing justice and serving humanity on so many fronts. They’re working to meet the needs of families displaced by the global refugee crisis. They’re fighting racism and other forms of intolerance. They’re closing the education achievement gap and reimagining schooling for an increasingly diverse student population. They’re working to mitigate the effects of poverty on physical and mental wellbeing, and on outcomes in education and life. They’re reducing gun violence by youth and improving nutrition in under-served schools and communities. They’re illuminating the importance of the arts for developing young minds.

And that’s just a small sample of the exciting and urgently needed work taking place at TC. Whatever your interest or issue, and whatever your cultural or intellectual background, you can help build a better world by joining forces with Teachers College.

RESTORING COMMUNITY As an undergraduate in Turkey, Ceren Sönmez (left) studied engineering -- but her real interest was in people. Now she coordinates a project guided by TC's Lena Verdeli to make group interpersonal therapy (IPT) central to the mental health system in Lebanon, which has absorbed millions of Syrian refugees.
RESTORING COMMUNITY As an undergraduate in Turkey, Ceren Sönmez (left) studied engineering -- but her real interest was in people. Now she coordinates a project guided by TC's Lena Verdeli to make group interpersonal therapy (IPT) central to the mental health system in Lebanon, which has absorbed millions of Syrian refugees.
Right now, though, there is one area where we need to step up our efforts: Creating scholarships to support our talented students, who represent the future not only for TC but the world. Regardless of how you want to “fund your passion,” the key to the success of any program is the students, who work side by side with our professors and then, as alumni, carry forth and build on their ideas. And thanks to a generous donor, we're offering a select number of dollar-for-dollar matches on $50,000-$250,000 gifts to create or enhance an endowed scholarship fund. So support TC students now!

“Thanks to a generous donor, we're offering a select number of dollar-for-dollar matches on $50,000-$250,000 gifts to create or enhance an endowed scholarship fund. So support TC students now!”
—Suzanne M. Murphy

GIVE NOW

Certainly we’ve made huge strides in assisting our students. The Campaign has created 150 new scholarships, including 47 during the past year alone. Overall, TC has increased financial aid by 108 percent over the past decade. To help you understand why, despite those are great numbers, we must do so much more, let me introduce just a few of the students who are benefiting from that support.

Ceren Sönmez grew up in Turkey and studied engineering as an undergraduate. She found that her real curiosity was about people — their motivations and feelings. A professor in Turkey told her that TC offered her the best chance to conduct and apply research that would make an immediate difference in people’s lives. She has since connected with Professor Lena Verdeli, Director of TC’s Global Mental Health Lab, who is the world’s foremost authority on using Group Interpersonal Therapy (IPT) to help people displaced by war, epidemic or natural disaster overcome paralyzing depression and anxiety. Now, as she completes her Ph.D. with the help of TC’s Jodi Lane Scholarship, Ceren is coordinating Professor Verdeli’s project to help restructure the entire mental health care system in Lebanon, which has absorbed a flood of refugees from Syria.

“With our funder in Canada, our partners at the University of Cambridge and, of course, the team in Lebanon, it can be very tricky to get something done within a day,” Ceren says. “But it’s a wonderful learning opportunity for me. I consider myself so lucky for being involved in this project.”

$290 million
TC has raised 97% of its $300 million Campaign goal (as of May 19, 2017)

GIVE NOW

Edmund Adjapong’s mentor is Professor Christopher Emdin, who was his ninth-grade physics teacher. “Science is a really Eurocentric discipline — there are not many people of color,” says Edmund, who just received his Ph.D. in Science Education. “So in textbooks, I never really saw pictures that reflected who I was or things I identified with.”

But when Professor Emdin used hip-hop to engage his students, Edmund got excited about science. He started college as a biochemistry major, planning to be a pharmacist, but switched to teaching because he wanted to communicate that same excitement to others who felt marginalized in the classroom. At TC, supported by the Peter Greeman Scholarship, Edmund coordinated Professor Emdin’s Science Genius Project, a competition in which students create science-themed raps, and expanding it to other countries. He also wrote a thesis on bringing specific hip-hop practices into the classroom — something that, as a sixth-grade science teacher in his old neighborhood in the Bronx, he has ample opportunity to do.

HELP IS ON THE WAY As a student of emergency medical care in Pakistan, Usama Mirza (right; M.A. '17) often felt afraid of failing. At TC he learned more about teaching general and, from Professor Mary Mendenhall, about teaching under crisis conditions. He's starting a nonprofit to teach emergency care in Pakistan's remote areas.
HELP IS ON THE WAY As a student of emergency medical care in Pakistan, Usama Mirza (right; M.A. '17) often felt afraid of failing. At TC he learned more about teaching general and, from Professor Mary Mendenhall, about teaching under crisis conditions. He's starting a nonprofit to teach emergency care in Pakistan's remote areas.
Usama Javed Mirza was inspired to attend TC by his second-grade teacher in Pakistan, Hareem Atif Khan, an alumna and former Convocation speaker who is now a TC instructor and staff developer with the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project. At TC, supported by several scholarships, Usama, who just received his master's degree in Curriculum & Teaching, worked with Professor Mary Mendenhall, a leader in studying and creating education for displaced young people around the world. Like Dr. Khan, he, too, spoke at Convocation. With his enhanced understanding of teaching, he’s launching a nonprofit that will teach villagers in remote areas of Pakistan to manage health crises and disasters.

$78.3 million
TC has raised $78.3 million in scholarships and fellowships. Help us reach our goal!

SUPPORT OUR STUDENTS

Clearly investing in our students pays off — but we need to help more students like Ceren, Edmund and Usama. To show you how your fellow alumni and TC friends are doing that, we also introduce here a photo gallery of recent scholarship supporters. We hope that they — and other donors featured in ads throughout this issue of TC Today — convey our message that TC donors come in all shapes, sizes, colors, ages and income brackets, with interests that run the gamut.

A gift to support any student is a very special thing, because it helps launch a lifetime of good works that in turn may empower many others.

A gift to support a student at TC could very well change the world. So be there for tomorrow. Join our Campaign and invest in the future, today.

SUZANNE M. MURPHY (M.ED. ’99, M.A. ’96)
VICE PRESIDENT, DEVELOPMENT & EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends
 

Un-selfies: Why They Give

TC wants you to see yourself in our Campaign. Below, snapshots and thoughts from some friends of our students

Camilla Smith

TC Trustee Camilla Smith (M.A. ’72; at right) and Professor Kim Noble

Camilla Smith is a passionate advocate for making cutting-edge resources available to TC faculty and students.

Beverly Edgehill (Ed.D. ’05)

Beverly Edgehill (Ed.D. ’05)

“Nothing should stand in the way of a quality education!”

Melinda Krei (Ph.D. ’93)

Melinda Krei (Ph.D. ’93)

“I am grateful for my experience at TC and wanted to give others that opportunity.”

Jeffrey Fisher

Jeffrey Fisher (M.A. ’16)

“I want to reinforce TC's message that learning continues after graduation with experiential tours, informal lectures and lots of great reading.”

Charo Uceda and Charla Tindall

Search

TC President’s Advisory Council member Charo Uceda (M.A. ’08; at left)

“I want to create a never-ending chain to give back to TC.”

Charo Uceda and Charla Tindall

Search

TC President’s Advisory Council member Charla Tindall (M.A. ’69; at right)

“I received a fellowship and want to pass that along. Many education students can’t afford private universities, and every little bit helps.”

Abby the Therapy Dog

Abby the Therapy Dog

“With my humans, TC graduates Bill and Karen Baldwin – John Dewey Circle and Maxine Greene Society members – I support TC's students.”

Michela Presciutti

Michela Presciutti, 12, whose brother is TC Clinical Psychology master’s student Alex Presciutti

“I donated because I think everyone deserves a chance to have a great education.” Michela donated at TC’s 2017 Academic Festival.  This photo was taken by her father, Robert Presutti.  

Barker Boys

The Barker Family: TC Vice President of Development & External Affairs Suzanne Murphy (M.Ed. ’99, M.A. ’96), Jeffrey Barker and sons Michael and Timmy

“Helping TC families strengthens the TC community.”

Bernardo Tirado

Alumni Council Member Bernardo Tirado (MA. ’01)

“I want to invest in our future leaders.”

Katherine Embree

Vice Provost Katie Embree (Ed.D. ’01)

“Now, more than ever, the world needs TC students!”

Beverly Johnson

Beverly Johnson (Ed.D. ’86)

“I give to continue TC’s legacy of excellence.”

Irene Trowell-Harris

Major General (USAF Retired) Irene Trowell-Harris (Ed.D. ’83)

“Faculty member guidance and mentoring helped me to excel academically and professionally. I am paying it forward because investment in students pays dividends for a lifetime.”

Support Endowed Scholarships

Click here for full listing of tribute and legacy scholarships.

Questions? Contact Linda Colquhoun at 212 678-3679.

Support the TC Fund
The Campaign for Teachers College

 

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