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The Language and Social Interaction Working Group (LANSI)

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Nancy   Boblett

Nancy Boblett

Nancy Boblett has taught ESL/EFL and Spanish for over 35 years in Spain and in the U.S. She currently teaches Classroom Practices and Practicum I in the TESOL/AL M.A. program at Teachers College, Columbia University. In addition, she teaches Academic Language and Culture for the Office of International Services at TC and gives workshops on Speaking, Intelligibility, Listening, and Building Fluency at Baruch College (CUNY). At present, Nancy is pursuing Ed.D. studies at Teachers College and her areas of interest include teacher education, teacher expertise, and classroom discourse. 

Catherine DiFelice Box

Catherine DiFelice Box

Catherine DiFelice Box is a Lecturer in the Educational Linguistics Division at the University of Pennsylvania. She earned her M.A. and Ed.D. in Applied Linguistics at Teachers College, Columbia University. She holds a second M.A. in English from West Chester University, and an A.B. in English/French at Muhlenberg College, where she graduated Phi Beta Kappa and was awarded the Phi Sigma Iota Award for Excellence in Romance Languages, and the Paul C. Scherr Award for Outstanding Writing. She has taught English Literature, ESL, and French in the United States at both the K-12 and the postsecondary level; she has also taught English in Paris, France, at secondary and postsecondary levels. Presently a teacher trainer, her passion is to advocate for immigrants and immigrant education and improve teaching methods in content-based classrooms. Her research focuses on interaction and multimodality in educational settings, both traditional and informal, conducting her work within the conversation analytic paradigm. Formerly an executive board member of New York State TESOL, Catherine has presented research at AAAL, NYS TESOL, SETESOL, TESOL International, as well as conferences in France, Greece, and Switzerland. Her work, often in collaboration with other researchers from Teachers College, has appeared in Applied Linguistics Review, Language & Information Society, Learning & Individual Differences, and Language, Culture, & Social Interaction.

Lauren Carpenter

Lauren Carpenter

Lauren Carpenter, Ed.M., is a doctoral candidate in applied linguistics at Teachers College, Columbia University. She has over 13 years of experience teaching in various TESOL contexts. A former New York City teaching fellow, Lauren has taught English as a New Language to children of all ages in public schools. She has also has taught English as a Foreign language to adult professionals in Ecuador as well as English as a Second Language for the Community Language Program at Teachers College, Columbia University. In addition, Lauren has supervised and mentored ESL teachers at both Teachers College and Hunter College. As a doctoral candidate and researcher, her research interest involves exploring the “how” of classroom teaching and learning, examining interactional and embodied practices by use of conversation analysis. Her work has appeared in Working Papers in Applied Linguistics & TESOL and in Multilingual Matters (forthcoming) and she has presented research at national conferences such as American Association for Applied Linguistics and Georgetown University Round Table. She is a recipient of the Dean’s Grant for Student Research from Teachers College, Columbia University for her study entitled Developing Student Teacher Elicitations Over Time: A Conversation Analytic Intervention. 

Ignasi Clemente

Ignasi Clemente

Ignasi Clemente is Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Hunter College, CUNY, USA. His research interests include sociocultural and communicative aspects of pain and suffering, childhood studies, and embodied communication. His research on chronically ill children has been published in journals such as Social Science and MedicineSociology of Health and Illness, and Communication and Medicine. Among others, he has contributed to the Oxford Textbook of Paediatric Pain (OUP, 2013), the Handbook of Conversation Analysis (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013), Healthcare Settings: Policy, Participation and New Technologies (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010), and the Blackwell Guide to Research Methods in Bilingualism (Blackwell, 2008).

Sarah Creider

Sarah Creider

Sarah Creider received her doctorate in Applied Linguistics from Teachers College, Columbia University. Her interests include conversation analysis, institutional discourse, teacher-student interaction, and teacher training. Her current research focuses on multi-modal analyses of teacher-student interactions, and on how teachers encourage student participation without asking questions. Sarah has taught English as a second language in Europe and the US and specializes in curriculum and methods for adults with limited first language literacy. She is an adjunct assistant professor at Teachers College and Hunter College. Sarah's work has been published in the Journal of Contemporary Foreign Language Studies; Learning, Culture, & Social Interaction; Discourse Studies; Language and Information Society; and Working Papers in TESOL & Applied Linguistics. A co-authored article will appear later this year in the Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice.

Domenica (Donna) Luvera DelPrete

Domenica (Donna) Luvera DelPrete

Domenica (Donna) Luvera DelPrete holds an Ed.D. (2015) and an Ed.M. (2008) in Applied Linguistics from Teachers College, Columbia University and an M.A. in Italian Literature from Boston College (1992). Her dissertation work is a case study that examines the discursive interaction between a mother and her adolescent daughter. While she is working within an interactional sociolinguistic theoretical framework, her analysis is also quite informed by conversation analysis methods. She has presented her work at AAAL (Portland, 2014), as well as written forum articles in the AL/TESOL web journal. Other research interests include pragmatics and its connection to second language learning. She has addressed this topic at several workshops at William Paterson University's annual Bilingual/Bicultural Conference. 

Guadalupe Ruiz Fajardo

Guadalupe Ruiz Fajardo

Guadalupe Ruiz Fajardo received her Ph.D. in Didactics of Spanish as a Foreign Language from the University of Granada in 1992 and has taught at various European universities, including the Universidad de Granada, Ume Universitet and Lunds Universitet. Her main areas of research are the use of mass media in language pedagogy, and Spanish as a second language for immigrant communities in Spain. She is co-author of two advanced-level Spanish language textbooks, Abanico and El Ventilador (Editorial Difusin, 1995 and 2006), and the scholarly monograph V-deo en clase (Universidad de Granada, 1993) as well as of articles in journals such as Cuadernos Cervantes and Textos de Did-ctica de la Lengua y la Literatura y Marco ELE. She has also edited a collection of articles on second language learning and teaching, Did-ctica del espaol como segunda lengua para inmigrantes (UNIA, 2009) and Methodological Developments in Teaching Spanish as a Second and Foreign Language (CSP, 2012). This book is the result of a series of workshops for teachers under the same title that takes place every spring at New York. She has been active in coordinating and teaching methodology courses for graduate students and teachers of Spanish as a foreign language at the Universidad Internacional Menndez Pelayo, Universidad Internacional de Andaluc-a, Instituto Cervantes, and other institutions. Her areas of interest and research are two. Oral Interaction/Conversational Analysis applied to Language teaching and Learning; and the teaching of a new language to immigrants communities in Spain.

Christine M Jacknick

Christine M Jacknick

Christine M Jacknick, an Assistant Professor at Borough of Manhattan Community College at the City University of New York, is a discourse analyst utilizing conversation analysis to examine discursive practices in the language classroom, highlighting the collaborative nature of talk and identifying the exercise of agency and power through interactional practices. Her research has been published in Classroom Discourse and Novitas: ROYAL, and she is co-editor and contributor to Language in Institutions: A LANSI Volume published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Rong Rong Le

Rong Rong Le

Rong Rong Le received her Ed.D. in TESOL at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her interests include cross-cultural and interlanguage pragmatics, discourse and social interaction. Her current research focuses on pragmatic structure and interactional patterns of compliment event in multi-party natural spontaneous conversation. Rong Rong has taught English at East China Normal University. She has also been a pioneer of Chinese teaching in the US secondary schools, created curriculum and materials from beginning to advanced levels. Her research on learner characteristics and teaching methodology "East Meets West -- Teaching Eastern Language to Western Learners in a Western Environment" was featured at the Northeast Conference on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Her co-authored college English textbook series "Step By Step -- A Comprehensive Listening Course" has been awarded the "Most Popular Textbook Award" and the "First Prize of Outstanding Textbooks of High Education" by Ministry of Education of China. She has served on College Board Chinese SAT II Test Development Committee for four consecutive years. 
Carol Lo

Carol Lo

Carol Lo is a doctoral candidate in Applied Linguistics at Teachers College, Columbia University and President of the Language and Social Interaction Working Group (LANSI). Her research interests include pedagogical interaction, cross-cultural interaction, and the use of discourse markers in interaction. In particular, she pursues the question of how participants in the adult ESL classroom manage understanding of the subject matter and understanding among themselves. She has received Top Student Paper Award from the Language and Social Interaction Division of National Communication Association (NCA). Her work has appeared in Classroom Discourse and Working Papers in Applied Linguistics and TESOL.

 

Trudy Milburn

Trudy Milburn

Trudy Milburn, Ph.D. is Assistant Dean at Purchase College. Dr. Milburn’s newest co-edited book, Engaging and Transforming Global Communication Through Cultural Discourse Analysis was published by Fairleigh Dickinson Press in January 2019. In her research, she examines the ways membership categories are enacted and displayed in various organizational and professional settings, both online and face-to-face. She has been a tenured, Associate Professor on the faculties of California State University, Channel Islands and Baruch College/The City University of New York, and is a past chair of the Language and Social Interaction Division of the National Communication Association.

Gahye Song

Gahye Song

Gahye Song is a doctoral student in Applied Linguistics at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research interests include the relationship between grammar and interactional patterns and second language socialization in/outside of classrooms, using the methodological framework of conversation analysis. She is currently teaching advanced Korean at Columbia University and has taught ESL/EFL in the United States and South Korea. Her work on membership categorization analysis appeared in Working Papers in TESOL & Applied Linguistics. She has also co-authored 3 EFL textbooks and accompanying teacher's guides (grades 7 to 9) published in South Korea (Reading Engine 1, 2, and 3, 2014). She received her B.A. from McGill University and her M.A. and Ed.M. from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Joowon Suh

Joowon Suh

Joowon Suh works as a senior lecturer of Korean in the Department of East Asian Studies at Princeton University.  She received her Ed.M. (2000) and Ed.D. (2007) in applied linguistics from Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research interests include Korean linguistics and language pedagogy, discourse analysis, sociolinguistics, interlanguage pragmatics and intercultural communication. She has, in collaboration, revised four textbooks and written four new accompanying workbooks of the KLEAR Integrated Korean series: Beginning 1 (2009), Beginning 2 (2010), Intermediate 1 (2012), and Intermediate 2 (2013). She also served on the task force that created Standards for Korean Language Learning (2012). Currently, she is serving a three-year term as Executive Secretary of the American Association of Teachers of Korean. Suh also serves on the editorial boards of Korean Semantics and Language and Information Society.

Nadja Tadic

Nadja Tadic

Nadja Tadic received her doctorate in Applied Linguistics from Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research interests include classroom interaction, critical pedagogy, and combining the conversation analytic and critical discourse analytic frameworks to uncover ways of maximizing learning. She is particularly interested in issues of sociocultural diversity and identifying instructional and interactional practices that can help increase minoritized students' participation, learning, and achievement. Her work has been published in journals such as Language and Education, Linguistics and Education, and Studies in Applied Linguistics & TESOL.

Junko Takahashi

Junko Takahashi

Junko Takahashi is a doctoral student in the Applied Linguistics program at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research interests include discourse analysis, conversation analysis, and interactional sociolinguistics, particularly pertaining to East Asian students' participation/self-selection patterns in the American classrooms. She has taught ESL and Japanese at St. Peter's University and New Jersey City University. She has presented her projects at international conferences including AAAL, TESOL, AILA, ILA, to name a few. Her research articles have appeared in Linguistics and Education, Communication Education, and Working Papers of Applied Linguistics & TESOL. She is also an education writer for Japanese newspapers. Her education column appears in NY Life Weekly and the weekend section of Nikkei and Asahi newspapers in the U.S.  In Japan, she is a published author of an education book for Japanese families "America chuzai: Korede anshin kodomo no kyoiku navi"(“Navigating Children’s Education in America) (2008) and a contributing writer of "Living in English-Speaking Countries" (2011).


Chris Van Booven

Chris Van Booven

Chris Van Booven is a doctoral student in the Multilingual Multicultural Studies program at New York University. His research examines the development of adult second language interactional competence in educational contexts that provide structured opportunities for naturally occurring conversation between native and non-native speakers, including study abroad, service learning, apprenticeships, and language exchanges.

Santoi Wagner

Santoi Wagner

Santoi Wagner is Senior Lecturer in Educational Linguistics, and Associate Director of TESOL at the University of Pennsylvania's Graduate School of Education. Her research interests lie at the interface of language and social interaction in the institutional orders of education and mediation. Currently, she is examining how the concept of interactional competence can illuminate the efficacy and validity of interactive performance assessments of prospective international teaching assistants.

Hansun Zhang Waring

Hansun Zhang Waring

Hansun Zhang Waring is the founder of LANSI and Associate Professor of Linguistics and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. As an applied linguist and a conversation analyst, Hansun is primarily interested in understanding the discourse of teaching and learning in a variety of pedagogical contexts. Her work has appeared in leading journals in applied linguistics and discourse analysis. She is on the editorial board ofClassroom Discourse.

Neil Williams

Neil Williams

I've been teaching at NYU for the last 30 years, where I'm a Master Teacher of ESL. I came to CA late -- when I graduated from TC in the early 90's, classroom description was the dominant paradigm, and my initial interest was in describing  Speech Grammar, and finding a methodology for raising student awareness of it. It was only when I started teaching International TAs that I realized there was a whole other interactional dimension to language, and I discovered CA. I consider myself still very much a novice in the discipline, and find the monthly data sessions invaluable for discovering more and more about what goes on in face-to-face interaction. My current interest is in how speakers use the seemingly -'empty' verbhappen in utterances like I happen to live in New York.

Jean Wong

Jean Wong

Jean Wong received her doctorate in Applied Linguistics from UCLA. She is Associate Professor in the Department of Special Education, Language and Literacy at The College of New Jersey (Ewing, NJ), where she teaches graduate courses in the Teaching English as a Second Language Program. Her scholarly work, which appears in journals and in edited volumes, focuses primarily on using conversation analysis (CA) as a handle for understanding how L1-L2 English conversation is made to happen, which includes, among its concerns, aspects of repair, repetition, grammar, response tokens, and oral narrative. Jean is also interested in using CA insights and concepts to raise classroom teachers' awareness of the importance of interactional competence in second/foreign language teaching and learning. She is co-author, with Dr. Hansun Waring, of the volume, Conversation Analysis and Second Language Pedagogy: A guide for ESL/EFL Teachers (Routledge).

Di Yu

Di Yu

Di Yu is past president of LANSI and a doctoral candidate in Applied Linguistics at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research interests include media discourse, political discourse, humor, and the use of multimodal resources in interaction. Di has presented her research at conferences such as IIEMCA, ICCA, AAAL, IPrA, and AILA. Her co-authored work has appeared in Research on Children and Social Interaction, Discourse & Communication, and Language Learning Journal. She serves as the Web Editor and Book Review Editor for the journal Studies in Applied Linguistics and TESOL (SALT). She currently holds a full-time administrative position and teaches undergraduate-level courses at SUNY Purchase College.

 

Elizabeth  Reddington

Elizabeth Reddington

Elizabeth Reddingtona past president of LANSI, received her Ed.D. in Applied Linguistics from Teachers College. Her interests include applying conversation analysis in the study of professional practice. As an ESL/EFL instructor and teacher educator, she is particularly interested in examining classroom interaction to gain insight into relationships between teacher practices, student participation, and the creation of opportunities for language learning. Her work, often in collaboration with other LANSI members, has appeared in Classroom Discourse, Discourse & Communication, HUMOR: International Journal of Humor Research, Linguistics and Education, and Studies in Applied Linguistics & TESOL. She is the editor, with Hansun Waring, of Communicating with the Public: Conversation Analytic Studies (Bloomsbury).

Jasmine   Ma

Jasmine Ma

Jasmine Ma is Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education at Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at NYU. Her research investigates how individuals and groups engage in mathematical activity and learn across different settings. In particular, she pursues questions of what counts as mathematics and mathematical reasoning in a variety of settings, how learning is organized, and how whole bodies might support or play a role in mathematics. Her work has been published in journals such as Mind, Culture, and Activity, Journal of the Learning Sciences, and Journal of Teacher Education

Allie Hope King

Allie Hope King

Allie Hope King is a doctoral candidate in Applied Linguistics at Teachers College, Columbia University. She has an Ed.M. in Applied Linguistics from TC, an M.Ed. in Foreign Language Education and TESOL from the University of Pittsburgh, and a bachelor’s in Modern Languages from Carnegie Mellon University. Her research focuses on classroom discourse, specifically what co-teacher interaction looks like through a conversation analytic lens. Prior to returning to New York for her current academic endeavors, she taught ESL in a number of contexts and locations around the U.S. While at TC, she has taught several courses in the Community Language Program, and has been a mentor and instructor for the TESOL Certificate Program. 

Alexander  Lee

Alexander Lee

Alexander Lee is a doctoral candidate in Applied Linguistics at Teachers College, Columbia University. Broadly, his areas of research interests include classroom discourse, conversation analysis, and interactional sociolinguistics. A two-time recipient of the Fulbright Scholarship, he has given invited talks and presented his peer-reviewed research at Harvard, Stanford, and Columbia, among others.

Kelly  Frantz

Kelly Frantz

Kelly Frantz is a doctoral student in the Applied Linguistics program at Teachers College, Columbia University. She received her BA from Allegheny College and MA in Applied Linguistics from Teachers College. As a former Fulbright English Teaching Assistant, she has taught English both in the US and abroad for a number of years. Now, as a doctoral student, her research interests are still developing; however, she is specifically interested in using conversation analysis to study interaction in language classrooms and writing centers.

Alyson   Horan

Alyson Horan

Alyson Horan is a doctoral student in the Applied Linguistics Program at Teachers College, Columbia University. She received her BA from Columbia College Chicago and her MA in TESOL from Portland State University. In addition to various experiences teaching in the US, Alyson served two years with the Peace Corps, teaching English at a university in Southern China. Her research interests include discourse and conversation analysis, particularly in the study of American Sign Language and those who learn signed languages as a non-native language.  

 

Mark  Romig

Mark Romig

Mark Romig is a doctoral candidate in applied linguistics at Teachers College, Columbia University. Before moving to NYC, he received a BA in Anthropology from SUNY Geneseo. After that, he received an MA in Linguistics from CUNY Graduate Center and a second MA in TESOL from CUNY Hunter. He has been working with adult ESL students for a number of years as both a teacher and a language program administrator in academic contexts and community-based organizations. Additionally, he has supervised and mentored ESL teachers at CUNY Hunter and Teachers College. He is interested in classroom discourse, conversation analysis, teacher supervision, and learning material development. Currently, he is investigating how participation is managed in the classroom, specifically, how teachers hold students accountable for their own learning.  

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Data Session

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