2011 TC Research
Teachers College, Columbia University
Teachers College Columbia University

Research

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Stephen T Peverly

Professional Background

Educational Background

B.A. (Psychology), Manhattan College; M.S., Ed.S., SUNY, Albany (Educational Specialist in School Psychology); Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University (Educational Psychology)

Specializations: Cognition and Instruction; The development of academic skills, especially reading, writing and notetaking.

Certifications/Licensure: School Psychologist Certificate (permanent form), New York; Massachusetts; License Psychologist, New York (#011690-1)

 

Scholarly Interests

His research focuses on 2 areas: (a) the cognitive processes that underlie reading comprehension and studying, and (b) cross-cultural differences between U.S. and Chinese children in mathematical performance and the reasons for differences in performance. He teaches course on memory, reading comprehension and studying, and law and ethics for school psychologists.

Selected Publications


Peverly, S. T. (in press). Beyond the Monitoring of Students’ Progress in Classrooms: The Assessment of Students, Curricula and Teachers. In S. Rosenfield & V. Berninger (Eds.), Translating science-supported instruction into evidenced based practices. NY: Oxford University Press.

Han, Z. H, & Peverly, S. T. (2007). Input processing: A study of ab initio learners with multilingual backgrounds. International Journal of Multiculturalism, 4, 17-37.

Peverly, S. T., Ramaswamy, V., Brown, C., Sumowski, J., Alidoost, M., & Garner, J. (2007). Skill in Lecture Note-taking: What Predicts? Journal of Educational Psychology, 99, 167-180.
 
Zhou, Z., Peverly, S. T., & Xin, T. (2006). Knowing and teaching fractions: A cross-cultural study of American and Chinese mathematics teachers. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 31, 438-457.
   
Peverly, S. T. (2006). The importance of handwriting speed in adult writing. Developmental Neuropsychology, 29, 197-216.

Zhou, Z., Peverly, S. T., Lin, J-S., & (2005). Understanding early mathematical competencies in American and Chinese children. School Psychology International, 26, 413-427.

Peverly, S. T. (2005). Moving past cultural homogeneity: Suggestions for comparisons of students' educational outcomes in the U.S. and China. Psychology in the Schools, 42, 241-249.

 

principal publications

Peverly, S. T., Ramaswamy, V., Brown, C., Sumowski, J., Alidoost, M., & Garner, J. (revise and resubmit). Skill in Lecture Note-taking: What Predicts? Journal of Educational Psychology.

Zhou, Z., Peverly, S. T., & Xin, T. (in press). Knowing and teaching fractions: A cross-cultural study of American and Chinese mathematics teachers. Contemporary Educational Psychology.

Han, Z. H, & Peverly, S. T. (in press). Input processing: A study of ab initio learners with multilingual backgrounds.International Journal of Multiculturalism.

Peverly, S. T. (2006). The importance of handwriting speed in adult writing. Developmental Neuropsychology, 29, 197-216.

Zhou, Z., Peverly, S. T., Lin, J-S., & (2005). Understanding early mathematical competencies in American and Chinese children. School Psychology International, 26, 413-427.

Moy, R., & Peverly, S. T. (2005). Perceptions of mathematics curricula and teaching in China. Psychology in the Schools, 42, 251-258.

Peverly, S. T. (2005). Moving past cultural homogeneity: Suggestions for comparisons of students' educational outcomes in the U.S. and China. Psychology in the Schools, 42, 241-249.

Zhou, Z., & Peverly, S. T. (2005). Introduction to the special issue on culture and psychology: Fulbright Psychologists and Educators in China. Psychology in the Schools, 42, 229-231.

Zhou, Z., Peverly, S. T. (2005). Teaching addition and subtraction to 1st graders: A Chinese perspective. Psychology in the Schools, 42, 259-272.

Benuck, M. & Peverly, S. T. (2004). The effect of orthographic depth on reliance upon semantic context for oral reading in English and Hebrew. Journal of Research in Reading, 27, 281-299.

Zhou, Z., & Peverly, S. T. (2004). Within- and across cultural variations in children's understanding of distance, time, and speed interrelations: A follow-up study.Journal of Genetic Psychology, 165, 5-27.

Paradis, L. M., & Peverly, S. T. (2003). The effects of knowledge and task on students' peer-directed questions in modified cooperative learning groups. The Child Study Journal, 33, 117-139.

Peverly, S. T., Brobst, K., Graham, M., & Shaw, R. (2003). College Adults are not Good at Self-Regulation: A study on the Relationship of Self-regulation, Note-taking, and Test-taking. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95, 335-346.

Zhou, Z., & Peverly, S. T. (2003). Foreward to the special issue: Psychoeducational and psychosocial functioning of Chinese children. Psychology in the Schools, 40, 1-4.

Zhou, Z., & Peverly, S. T., Xin, T., Huang, A. S., & Wang, W. (2003). School adjustment of first-generation Chinese-American adolescents. Psychology in the Schools, 40, 71-84.

Peverly, S.T., Brobst, K.E. & Morris, K. (2002). The contribution of reading comprehension ability and meta-cognitive control to the development of studying. Journal of Research in Reading. 25, 203-216.

Peverly, S. T., Wood, R. (2001). The effect of adjunct questions and feedback on improving the reading comprehension of learning disabled adolescents. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 26, 25-43.

Zhou, Z., Peverly, S. Boehm, A., Chongde, L.. (2000). American and Chinese children's understanding of distance, time, and speed interrelations.Cognitive Development, 15, 215-240.

Peverly, S. T., & Kitzen, K. R. (1998).  Curriculum-based assessment of reading skills:  Considerations and caveats for school psychologists. Psychology in the Schools, 35, 29-47.

Peverly, S. T. (1994).  An overview of the potential impact of cognitive psychology on school psychology.  School Psychology Review, 23, 292-309.

Kelly, M. S. & Peverly, S. T.  (1992). The ability of the Kindergarten Screening Battery to predict first and second grade academic performance.  Journal of School Psychology, 30, 245-258.

Peverly, S.T.  (1991). Problems with the knowledge-based explanation of memory and development. Review of Educational Research, 61, 71-93.

Wang, M.C., & Peverly, S.T. (1986).  The self-instructive process in learning contexts.  Contemporary Educational Psychology, 11, 370-404.

DiVesta, F.J., & Peverly, S.T. (1984).  The effects of encoding variability, processing activity, and rule-examples sequence on the transfer of conceptual rulesJournal of Educational Psychology, 76, 108-119.

Wang, M.C., Peverly, S.T., & Randolph, R.F. (1984).  An investigation of the implementation and effects of a full-time mainstreaming program.  Journal of Special and Remedial Education, 5, 21-32.

Edited Volumes

Zhou, Z., & Peverly, S. T. (2005). Culture and Psychology; Fulbright Psychologists and Educators in China [Special Issue]. Psychology in the Schools.

Zhou, Z., & Peverly, S. T. (2003). Psychoeducational and psychosocial functioning of Chinese children [Special Issue]. Psychology in the Schools, 40 (1).

Chapters

Saigh, P. A., Brassard, M., & Peverly, S. (2004). Cognitive behavioral interventions for children and adolescents with PTSD. In S. Taylor (Ed). Advances in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder: Cognitive behavioral perspectives (pp. 243-263). New York: Springer.

Wang, M.C., Peverly, S.T. & Catalano, R. (1987).  Integrating special needs students in regular classes:  Programming, implementation, and policy issues.  In J. Gottlieb & B. W. Gottlieb (Eds.), Advances in special education (Vol. 6, pp. 119-149).  Greenwich, CT:JAI Press, Inc.

Wang, M.C., & Peverly, S.T. (1986).  The role of the learner:  An  individual difference variable in school learning and functioning.  In M.C. Wang, M.C. Reynolds, & H.J. Walberg (Eds.), The handbook of special education:  Research and practiceOxford, England: Pergammon.

 

professional presentations

HBSK 4025: Professional and ethical functions of school psychologists

Permission required. Overview of issues associated with the school psychologists roles within educational settings including assessment, intervention, and consultation. Education and disability law and ethics are stressed.

HBSK 4074: Development of reading comprehension strategies and study skills

Reading and study skills: Practical procedures based on research find-ings appropriate for teachers, counselors, and others. Discussion focuses on students in the middle elementary grades through young adulthood.

HBSK 5096: The psychology of memory

An analysis of perspectives on human memory with particular attention to knowledge, attention, strategic processes, meta-cognition, transfer, and context. The application of this information to practice is stressed.

HBSK 6574: Research in applied educational psychology: Cognitive processes related to studying

Permission required. Prerequisite: familiarity with statistical procedures and research design. Students participate in ongoing research or other special projects under the direction of a faculty member.

HBSK 6903: Research-independent study in reading

Permission required. Advanced students work with professor on research projects related to literacy skills across the lifespan.

Documents & Papers

Download: Stephen Peverly CV [Word]

Centers and Projects

Center on Chinese Education
Website: http://www.tc.columbia.edu/centers/coce/

The Center on Chinese Education, Teachers College Columbia University (CoCE) is aimed at contributing to a better understanding of education in China and to educational exchange between the United States and China. It seeks to achieve this mission through three categories of activities: research and development, education and training, as well as outreach and exchange. These activities will draw upon the historically special relationship between Chinese education and Teachers College, the interests and expertise of the faculty at Teachers College, as well as expertise and resources outside of Teachers College. Major funding for the Center's activities is provided by the Henry Luce Foundation and the Ford Foundation.

Contact: Mun C. Tsang
E-mail: mct27@columbia.edu