Curriculum & Teaching

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The Department of Curriculum & Teaching


Our Mission

The Department of Curriculum and Teaching, established in 1938, was the first department in the U.S. devoted to the scholarly study of problems of curriculum and teaching across all subjects and all levels of schooling, from early childhood through the education of teachers and supervisors. Broad questions about the nature, purpose, and design of curriculum and about the theory and practice of teaching remain at the core of all department programs. Addressing these questions in contemporary times calls for critical analyses of the ways in which curriculum, teaching, and schooling contribute to social inequalities and a commitment to educating for social justice. Our location in New York City compels us to focus intensely on the lives of children and youth who attend under-resourced schools and face complex challenges in urban centers, but this focus does not exclude attention to problems of teaching and curriculum in suburban and rural settings as well as international contexts. Across all our programs, the preparation of teachers, educational leaders, teacher educators, and educational researchers is designed to provide them with the intellectual tools needed to re-imagine schools and other educational settings. We aim to prepare the next generation of outstanding educators who have broad repertoires of knowledge, practices, and dispositions that enable all children, including those who have acquired labels, to gain access to and succeed with the kind of education that historically has been reserved for children of privilege. Teacher inquiry, critical perspectives, knowledge of content and pedagogy, a curricular stance, and the interrelationship of theory and practice are also woven throughout our certification and our advanced programs. 

Typical positions for which students are prepared include teacher or supervisor of:

  • infancy or early childhood education
  • early childhood special education
  • elementary education
  • secondary education
  • students with disabilities
  • gifted education
  • literacy

Director of:

  • child-care center
  • community or government-based organization or agency
  • infant and parent center
  • early childhood program
  • literacy

College teacher in undergraduate or graduate programs specializing in:

  • infancy or early childhood education
  • early childhood special education
  • early childhood policy
  • elementary or secondary education
  • teaching students with disabilities
  • gifted education
  • curriculum development
  • curriculum studies
  • literacy education
  • educational leadership and school change
  • teacher education
  • urban and multicultural education

Administrator (such as assistant superintendent, consultant, coordinator, director) in charge of:

  • curriculum and instruction
  • curriculum research
  • professional development
  • gifted education
  • language arts

Teacher-leader in programs for learners from infancy to adulthood

Consultant or educational specialist in a school or non-school agency

If you plan to work in a state other than New York, Teachers College has not made a determination if our programs meet the educational requirements for certification or professional licensure in any other state, Washington DC or Puerto Rico. We recommend that you review the state’s licensing board or teacher certification website for that state’s qualifications. The Office of Teacher Education will complete any necessary forms and/or letters for out-of-state certification on the completion of your approved teacher preparation program.

Programs

Faculty

  • Faculty

    • James H Borland Professor of Education
    • Lucy M Calkins Robinson Professor in Children's Literature
    • Daniel Friedrich Associate Professor of Curriculum
    • Maria Paula Ghiso Associate Professor of Literacy Education
    • Anne Lin Goodwin Evenden Professor of Education
    • Thomas Hatch Professor of Education
    • Michelle Georgia Knight-Manuel Professor of Education
    • Nancy Louise Lesko Maxine Greene Professor for Distinguished Contributions to Education
    • Srikala Naraian Associate Professor of Education
    • Celia Oyler Professor of Education
    • Dirck Roosevelt Associate Professor of Practice
    • Marjorie Siegel Professor of Education
    • Mariana V. Souto-Manning Professor of Early Childhood Education
    • Haeny S. Yoon Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education
  • Emeriti

    • Celia S. Genishi Professor Emerita of Education
    • Susan Recchia Professor of Education
    • Karen Zumwalt Professor Emerita of Education
  • Lecturers

    • Britt Kjerstin Hamre Lecturer
    • Kara G. Hollins Lecturer - Elementary and Secondary Inclusive Education Program (C&T)
    • Doris Catherine H. Rikhye Lecturer
    • Nancy Sall Lecturer
    • Samuel Shreyar Lecturer
    • Jacqueline Ann Simmons Senior Lecturer
    • Jean YiChin Wong Lecturer
  • Adjunct Faculty

    • Ann Michelle Esposito Adjuct Professor (C&T 4080.001 - Risk/Resil Early Dev: Birth-8)
    • Carmela B. Gustafson Adjunct Professor (C&T 4137.002 - Summer B - Carmela Gustafson)
    • Chiao-Wei Liu Adjunct Professor (Fall 2019, C&T 4010.001)
    • Lara Steensland Mullarkey Student Teacher Supervisor
    • Elizabeth Rose Rollins
    • Lisa Ruth Wright Director, Hollingworth Center
  • Instructors

    • Angel Acosta C&T Wellness Workshop Facilitator
    • Rebecca L Bellingham Instructor
    • La Toya Camille Kamiska Caton Full Time Instructor
    • Hui Soo Chae
    • Georgina Wood Duff Part Time Instructor (C&T 4502.002 - G. Duff - Fall 2020)
    • Abigail Copeland Emerson Course Assistant
    • Amanda Reeves Fellner Head Teacher
    • Joshua David Jenkins Part Time Instructor (Fall 2019, C&T 4132.005)
    • Hareem Atif Khan Instructor
    • Chico Reynard Knight Part Time Instructor (C&T 5091.001 - Spring 2020)
    • Rachel Powers Knight Full Time Instructor (Early Childhood Education)
    • Rachel Leeper Part Time Instructor (C&T 4080.002 - R. Leeper - Fall 2020)
    • Tara F Lencl Part Time Instructor (C&T 4131.002 - T. Lencl - Fall 2020)
    • Madeleine Ilana Neufeld Full Time Instructor (Elementary Inclusive Preservice Program) AY 20/21
    • Katherine Scott Newhouse Bruce S. Goldberg Postdoctoral Fellow in Youth Wellbeing - Media and Social Change Lab
    • Christopher Richard Ongaro Part Time Instructor (C&T 4026.001 - C. Ongaro - Fall 2020)
    • Suzanne Pratt Co-Director
    • Michael Alexander Rae-Grant Full Time Instructor (Literacy Specialist Program)
    • Erica Michelle Russo Head Teacher
    • Emily Smith Associate Director of Professional Development
    • Catherine Yanan Cheng Stahl Part Time Instructor (C&T 4032.001 - C. Stahl)
    • Jamie Lee Uva Instructor

Courses

  • C&T 4000 - Disability, exclusion, and schooling
    This course explores the ways disability status and other facets of identity (such as race, ethnicity, language background, gender, sexuality, religious affiliation) interact with the cultural practices of exclusion in schooling. There is a central focus on ableism in schools, curriculum, and instruction. Students learn inclusive classroom pedagogies to mitigate exclusionary pressures in schools and work toward equitable practices and outcomes.
  • C&T 4001 - Differentiating instruction in inclusive classrooms
    For students preparing to be both general and special-education teachers. This course is designed to foster collaborative, problem-solving relationships among general and special education teachers, including co-teaching and co-planning and student families in designing and modeling inclusive pedagogies and practices for diverse learners. It also overviews the classroom uses of assistive instructional technologies and other accommodations in a laboratory format.
  • C&T 4002 - Curriculum theory and history
    The nature and design of educational activities: theory, research, and practice of curriculum design.
  • C&T 4004 - School change
    Major themes include state of the field regarding school change, schools as social organizations, the individual in the organization, theories of change, and implementation strategies and processes.
  • C&T 4005 - Principles of teaching and learning
    Examination of the relationships among teaching, learning, and assessment; teaching as a profession; and schools as complex social organizations.
  • C&T 4021 - Nature and needs of gifted students
    This introductory course in gifted education explores a number of issues related to the psychology and education of gifted students, including conceptions of giftedness, educational provisions for gifted students, creativity, and economically disadvantaged gifted students. Issues of race, class, gender, and disability status as they interact with the construct of giftedness are examined.
  • C&T 4022 - Instructional models in the education of gifted students
    What should gifted students learn? How can we differentiate the curriculum for gifted learners in order to meet their special needs more effectively? These and other questions will be addressed in this course devoted to the discussion, analysis, and evaluation of instructional models designed or adapted for gifted students. Emphasis will be placed on the principles of curricular differentiation and on providing an overview of a range of models designed to modify content, enhance the development of thinking skills, and enhance creativity. Issues of defining giftedness and of defensible differentiated curriculum will also be explored.
  • C&T 4023 - Differentiated curriculum for gifted students
    This course examines the characteristics of appropriate and defensible curriculum for gifted children and youth. Particular emphasis is placed on instructional strategies, curriculum theories, flexible grouping techniques, and meeting the needs of gifted learning in the regular classroom.
  • C&T 4024 - Planning and implementing programs for gifted students
    In this course, we examine factors affecting the planning and implementation of programs for students identified as gifted, components of gifted programs, and a systems approach to program planning. Students develop written program plans for specific settings. Issues of race, class, gender, and disability status as they affect the planning of gifted programs are examined. No prior experience with or knowledge of gifted education is required.
  • C&T 4025 - Nurturing Gifts and Talents in the Early Childhood Years
    The theme of this course centers on the potential and promise of all young children ages three through eight. Through workshop style sessions, visits to our early childhood lab school on campus, and guests talks from practitioners, we will grapple with how best to support each child's interests, passions, and over all development. We will take a critical stance as we examine the "deficit" perspective that disregards each child's full and unique profile. In our time together we will sample a variety of topics and ponder the best ways to support and celebrate the development of the full potential of our youngest learners.
  • C&T 4026 - Giftedness and Intelligence
    In this course, we explore theories of intelligence, which have served as a theoretical basis for the field of gifted education from its beginning. Starting with the work of Francis Galton in the 19th century and following through to the present day, we will critically examine and problematize such constructs as intelligence, creativity, and giftedness as well as such related topics as mental measurements.
  • C&T 4027 - Differentiated instruction of gifted students in the heterogeneous classroom
    Gifted students are present in almost every elementary, middle school, and high school classroom. The educational needs of these students can and must be met within this context. This workshop will provide an overview of curricular and instructional strategies designed to enhance the optimal development of gifted learners (and all learners) in the regular classroom. Topics will include general curricular modifications, management techniques, instructional strategies, individual learning opportunities, and outcomes and assessments. Special consideration will be given to those methods of differentiation that can be integrated readily into the learning environment of mixed-ability classrooms.
  • C&T 4029 - Creativity: Its nature and nurture
    An examination and critical appraisal of theories of creativity, test development to measure creativity, and methods designed to enhance the creativity of children and adults.
  • C&T 4032 - Gender, difference, and curriculum
    This course offers a multifaceted, interdisciplinary introduction to thinking about school curricula, policies, and practices as gendered. Gender will not be considered in isolation but as interwoven and complicated with cultural, racial, religious, class, and sexual identities, among others. The course materials will move beyond the identification of the problems to examine various efforts to create gender-sensitive curricula and programs.
  • C&T 4046 - Curriculum & Instruction Secondary Inclusive Educations
    An introduction to teaching, learning, and curriculum in secondary classrooms including: development and learning processes; instructional planning; observation and assessment; classroom management and environments; integrating instructional technologies and digital media; working in urban, diverse, and inclusive settings; and culture and community. The course emphasizes the relationship between theory and practice and supports students in the development of self-analytic, reflective, and problem solving skills in pedagogical contexts.
  • C&T 4047 - Curriculum development in secondary inclusive education
    Continuation and extension of C&T 4046, with an emphasis on curriculum design issues, state learning standards, Common Core standards, differentiation and assessment. Emphasis on inquiry-based procedures for teaching in secondary content areas to students with substantial academic and/or behavioral difficulties and on monitoring that instruction in a range of school environments. Students work collaboratively to plan and develop multi-level curriculum.
  • C&T 4052 - Designing curriculum and instruction
    Application of models for designing curriculum and instruction. Students design curriculum in collaborative groups.
  • C&T 4078 - Curriculum and teaching in urban areas
    Analysis of social context and resources for curriculum and teaching in urban areas.
  • C&T 4080 - Risk and resilience in early development
    A first course in child development, pre-birth through age 8, within a family context. Primary focus is on the impact of risk and disability on developmental outcomes, and those factors that promote resilience in young children, with and without disabilities, and their families.
  • C&T 4083 - Working with families of young children with disabilities
    This course offers current and historical perspectives on the role of families in the lives of young children with special needs, with a focus on family structures, resources, and concerns. Students will explore strategies for facilitating partnerships between families and professionals that support the developmental and educational needs of young children with disabilities.
  • C&T 4112 - Integrated Curriculum in Early Childhood Educations (full-year course)
    A two-semester course focused on integrated theories and methods in ECE/ ECSE. Will incorporate historical and sociocultural contexts, emphasis on physical and interpersonal environments in early childhood settings, centrality of play, social studies and science, adapting curricula for full range of abilities from infancy through grade 2.
  • C&T 4114 - Multicultural Approaches to Teaching Young Children
    Exploration of aspects of professional preparation needed for teaching from a multicultural perspective: first, the disposition toward inquiry needed for ongoing self-development; second, the knowledge and skills needed to infuse multicultural curriculum content, program designs, and teaching strategies; and third, the creation of a context through which participants can examine issues of social justice.
  • C&T 4117 - Play: The roots of competence in young children
    The origins of play and related aspects of development with implications for practice.
  • C&T 4119 - Issues and interdisciplinary methods for working with parents of young children
    Issues such as separation, problematic behaviors, and assessment are examined in the development of interdisciplinary strategies for working with parents of young children, with and without disabilities. Sessions are taught by an interdisciplinary team of faculty and invited speakers from special education, clinical psychology, early childhood education, psychiatry, pediatrics, and social work.
  • C&T 4121 - Early childhood teaching strategies within a social context
    Exploration of the teaching strategies used in early childhood education through analysis of the social contexts out of which they have arisen. Emphasis on assimilation and application of differing strategies through workshop format.
  • C&T 4123 - Curriculum and instruction in elementary education
    Permission required. An introduction to teaching, learning, and curriculum in elementary classrooms, including learning processes; instructional planning; student observation and assessment; classroom management; working in urban, diverse, and inclusive settings; and culture and community. The course emphasizes the relationship between theory and practice and supports students in the development of self-analytic, reflective, problem solving skills and instructional planning. Special fee: $100.
  • C&T 4124 - Curriculum development and instruction in inclusive elementary education
    Permission required. Continuation and extension of C&T 4123, with an emphasis on curriculum design, standards, multi-level curriculum development, and planning instruction based on student assessment.
  • C&T 4130 - Critical perspectives in elementary education
    Critical examination of issues bearing on lived experiences, practices, and purposes of elementary teachers and students in the US today. Includes child study with focus on two questions of educational justice: What does this child have a right to, in her/his education, today, here, now? Where does or can, this child contribute to and be recognized in this classroom? Readings include classroom studies, critical interventions in current events, and foundational texts for democratic, public education. Open to all; required for CUED students. Preferably students have opportunity concurrent with course to observe children at least one hour/week.
  • C&T 4131 - Language and literacy in the early childhood curriculum
    Introduction to research and practices related to early communication and literacy in early childhood settings (birth through prekindergarten). Focus will be on children whose first language is English, as well as English language learners, and on curricula and adaptations for full range of learners. (3 credits toward State literacy requirements)
  • C&T 4132 - Language and teaching in the primary reading/writing classroom
    Examines principles of literacy learning in young children and introduces theories, practices, and materials for teaching reading/writing in primary grades in diverse settings.
  • C&T 4133 - Learning and teaching in the intermediate reading/writing classroom
    Permission required. Examines strategies for teaching, organizing, and assessing reading, writing, and speaking in intermediate grades.
  • C&T 4136 - Methods and materials for reading instruction
    A survey of approaches to reading instruction from kindergarten through middle school with a critical examination of modern methods, materials, trends, and issues.
  • C&T 4137 - Literacy and learning in the content areas
    Introduction to theory, research, and practice on the role of literacy in learning mathematics, social studies, science, and the arts. Examination of talk, texts, and reading/writing practices used in content area teaching.
  • C&T 4138 - Teaching literacy in the early years
    Examination of theory, research, and practice of literacy learning and teaching in the early years, including children who are English language learners and children experiencing difficulty with school literacy. Emphasis on alternative models of designing literacy curricula, selection and use of materials (including technologies), and methods of assessing and teaching decoding, spelling, fluency, text use, and comprehension.
  • C&T 4139 - Constructing critical readers
    Prerequisite: C&T 4138. Examination of theory and practice on teaching reading in intermediate grade classrooms. Consideration of curriculum design, assessment practices, teaching methods and children's literature. Emphasis on curricular structures and strategies for teaching comprehension and critical analysis of fiction and nonfiction texts.
  • C&T 4140 - Literature for younger children
    Critical study of literary trends and materials for children in prekindergarten, kindergarten, and early grades. Consideration of developmental issues and reader response theory relating to young children.
  • C&T 4141 - Literature for older children
    The course integrates theory and practice for teachers. Topics include writing development, research on writing, models for responding to and evaluating student writing, and classroom methods for teaching the writing process in elementary classrooms.
  • C&T 4143 - Multicultural social studies in the elementary and middle school
    Teaching, learning, and curriculum development in social studies including a critical examination of content and methodology, current practices and issues, state, and professional standards.
  • C&T 4145 - Critical perspectives in secondary education
    A comprehensive examination of adolescent development and learning as they relate to issues of curriculum, teaching, and learning.
  • C&T 4151 - Teaching of writing
    The course integrates theory and practice for teachers. Topics include writing development, research on writing, curriculum development, methods of teaching writing, models for responding to and evaluating student writing, and classroom methods for teaching the writing process in elementary classrooms.
  • C&T 4160 - Supervision in initial teacher education programs
    Theory and practice of supervision of student teachers. This course will help students develop supervisory skills through case studies, role playing, and analysis of teaching.
  • C&T 4161 - The teacher: Socio-historical, cultural contexts of teaching
    Exploration of what it means to be a teacher through analysis of historical studies, teacher autobiographies, proposals for change, and personal reflection. Focus questions are: What is a good teacher? What is a professional teacher? Prerequisite: PreK-12 teaching experience.
  • C&T 4200 - Fieldwork in curriculum and teaching
    Permission required. Majors work under guidance. Students should have had previous coursework with their supervising staff member and should select a problem relating to this work.
  • C&T 4301 - Formal assessment of exceptional students
    Permission required. Participation in educational assessment of referred children. Analysis of observational and standardized test data; formulation of educational enrichments, accommodations, and modifications. Lab fee: $150.
  • C&T 4302 - Supervised practicum in the educational assessment of young children with exceptionalities
    Permission required. Prerequisite: C&T 4080. Participation in educational assessment of young children with exceptionalities. An introduction to formal and informal assessment strategies and their applications to work with young children. Analysis of observational and test data; formulation of educational interventions.
  • C&T 4308 - Intro to Diverse EC Classrooms
    A practicum for students in the Early Childhood initial certification program that serves as a prerequisite for student teaching. Field experiences will relate to work in other courses and be paired with an ongoing seminar designed to respond directly to issues as they arise in field placements.
  • C&T 4311 - Advanced practicum--Teaching students with disabilities
    Permission required. Practicum in New York City schools, coupled with Critical Special Education Core classes. Co-requisites: C&T 5080, 5081, and 5905.
  • C&T 4501 - Teaching and learning in the multicultural, multilingual classroom
    Student diversity (characterized by gender, race, ethnicity, language, special needs, and sexual orientation) is examined in relation to decisions about methodology, curriculum, instructional materials, student grouping, home-school-community relationships, and teachers' professional growth and development.
  • C&T 4502 - Master's project
    Permission required. Required for M.A. students in the Literacy Specialist Program. Students work to develop proposals to initiate required Master's action research project.
  • C&T 4615 - Young children and social policy: Issues and problems
    Overview of social policy towards young children as it affects classroom practice and professional goals. Situations such as child abuse, divorce and custody, student classification, and foster care are examined.
  • C&T 4702 - Student teaching-giftedness
    Observation and student teaching. Permission required. Course requires 3-5 days a week for participation in community, school, and agency programs and a weekly seminar on campus.
  • C&T 4705 - Observation and student teaching: Learning disabilities
    Students complete three full days per week at their residency placement in the fall and 4 full days per week at their residency placement in the spring. Students must follow the NYC DOE academic calendar.
  • C&T 4708 - Student teaching-infancy and early childhood
    Observation and student teaching. Permission required. This two-course sequence requires 3-5 days a week for participation in community, school, and agency programs and a weekly seminar on campus.
  • C&T 4726 - Professional laboratory experiences/student teaching in elementary education
    Permission required. Students must begin in the fall term. Students engage in an intensive field placement under the sponsorship of a classroom teacher with supervision shared by the cooperating teacher and Teachers College staff members. The experience begins with a three-week practicum period, followed by a ten-week student teaching experience; students spend a minimum of 3 1/2 days in the classroom each week. Classrooms provide experience with both younger and older children in a range of urban settings. Offered in conjunction with C&T 4123 and C&T 4124. Students applying to student teach must file a Declaration of Intention to Student Teach by mid-April, prior to the fall term.
  • C&T 4729 - Professional laboratory experiences/student teaching (year-long) in elementary education
    Permission required. Students engage in an intensive field placement under the sponsorship of a classroom teacher with supervision shared by the cooperating teacher and Teachers College staff members. The experience begins with a three-week practicum period, followed by a ten-week student teaching experience; students spend a minimum of 3 1/2 days in the classroom each week. Assignments to classrooms provide an emphasis on education for both younger and older children in a range of urban settings, including opportunities in the College’s professional development schools. Students applying to student teach must file a Declaration of Intention to Student Teach by April 15th prior to the fall term.
  • C&T 4835 - Improving reading instruction
    An institute focusing on current issues in reading and related areas. Includes oral and written language development and children's literature.
  • C&T 4842 - Institute: Content area literacies
    Introduces K-12 teachers to a toolkit of theories and practices to aid them in rethinking and redesigning literacy practices used in teaching mathematics, science, social studies, and other content areas.
  • C&T 4858 - Institute: Teaching of reading
    Designed to help teachers of grades K-8 develop a theoretical framework for the teaching of reading and a repertoire of strategies of enhancing students' independence and skills as readers.
  • C&T 4900 - Research and independent study: Curriculum and teaching
    Master's degree students undertake research and independent study under the direction of a faculty member.
  • C&T 5004 - School change
    Major themes include state of the field regarding school change, schools as social organizations, the individual in the organization, theories of change, and implementation strategies and processes.
  • C&T 5010 - Play, Power, and Popular Culture in Contemporary Childhoods
    In this course, we will explore the context of childhood(s) within contemporary culture. The current social, cultural, and political landscape comes with new sets of practices, ideas, and tools for interaction. Therefore, it is important to study the ways that children and youth play with popular culture to make sense of self and their social worlds. How does popular culture position children in society? How do children play with and through cultural tools (e.g. media/television, toys, technology, digital resources, pop culture icons/artifacts) in order to participate with others? What issues around power are raised when studying children at play in contemporary societies, specifically in terms of race, gender, class, ability, and age? While examining these questions, this course aims to privilege the voice of children as they engage in play through multiple modes in multiple platforms. Particular emphasis will be given to the close study and analysis of children’s play as a way to forefront identity and agency, especially as we consider school contexts.
  • C&T 5024 - Planning and Implementing Gifted Programs
    In this course, we examine factors affecting the planning and implementation of programs for students identified as gifted, components of gifted programs, and a systems approach to program planning. Students develop written program plans for specific settings. Issues of race, class, gender, and disability status as they affect the planning of gifted programs are examined. No prior experience with or knowledge of gifted education is required.
  • C&T 5033 - Seminar: Globalization, Democracy and Curriculum
    Some of the guiding questions of this exploration will be: What is new about current discourses on globalization? How are these current discourses affecting education and vice versa? What are the linkages between globalization, democracy and democratic education? How do these new trends impact different locations? How do these locations re-signify or appropriate these discourses? What are the limits to the (critical) discourses about globalization and democracy in education?
  • C&T 5037 - Literacy, Culture and the Teaching of Reading
    This 2-3 variable point course is a collaborative investigation into literacy as a social, cultural, and political practice. It provides opportunities for participants to unpack and re-imagine literacy learning and teaching for all students, but especially for those labeled “at risk” due to race/ethnicity, social class, nationality/language, gender, dis/ability, and sexuality. Rooted in the assumption that power circulates in culture, literacy, and education, this course looks closely at the role of power in reading texts, whether print-based, multimodal, digital, filmic, or embodied.
  • C&T 5042 - Special topics in children's literature
    Study of specific genres or curriculum issues in children's literature. Topics are announced in course schedules distributed each semester. Registration not limited to one term.
  • C&T 5051 - Narrative Knowing for Researching Teaching and Diversity
    This course is about an investigative approach to the lived experiences of people that privileges the stories they tell. Acknowledging such lived experience as a valuable source of knowledge, the premise of this course is that individuals’ representations of their experiences—their stories—matter to the scholarly investigation of social phenomena. Narrative, therefore, is both phenomenon and method. It is not simply an effort to valorize individual experience, nor does it presume that stories offer unmediated access to “authentic” experience. It is always simultaneously an exploration of the social, cultural and institutional narratives within which such experiences are constituted and expressed. In this course, we will examine “life as narrative” (Bruner, 2004), the importance of stories for everyday individual and institutional work, and the work of stories in accomplishing particular ends for groups and individuals. We will identify the ontological and epistemological commitments within different approaches to narrative inquiry. The course will be organized around two important strands that have benefited from a narrative approach—representations of historically marginalized lives and lives of teachers. With regard to the former, course readings will reflect texts that speak particularly to the experience of disability. Course participants, however, will be encouraged to seek out and bring to the table stories of lived experience that reflect other marginalized histories. Additionally, considering the challenging climate within which teachers are required to carry out their work, the course pays specific attention to the significance of narrative approaches for the investigation of teachers’ experiences. The course, then, is situated within a “critical humanist” perspective that “champions those values that give dignity to the person, reduce human suffering and enhance human well-being” (Plummer, 2011, 198.)
  • C&T 5053 - Staff development processes and procedures
    Concepts and practices related to staff development, professional education, and organizational improvement. Attention given to applications of staff development using institutional cooperation, organizational dynamics, and research on teacher training. Designed for principals, supervisors, curriculum directors, and others concerned with staff and program development to deal with change in their own institutional contexts.
  • C&T 5074 - Curriculum and teaching policy
    Prerequisite: C&T 4004. Examination of the theoretical and political bases of curriculum and teaching policies and their influences on school organizations and teaching practices. Explores the policy-making process from policy design through implemen-tation.
  • C&T 5080 - Access to full participation in schools
    This course is designed to offer an in-depth understanding of issues that frame the participation of students with disabilities in various educational settings. It critically examines the legal and structural framework that regulates the education of students with disabilities. This course explores current pedagogical practices within the field of special education, while it simultaneously seeks to build the tool-kit of teachers to meet the needs of students with varying kinds and degrees of educational needs. This involves a critical examination of classroom structures for participation that have traditionally been made available to students with disabilities as well as the exploration of alternate ones that can facilitate the learning and development of a diverse student body.
  • C&T 5081 - Collaborative communication in cultural contexts
    This course explores, from a disability studies perspective, strategies for developing effective communication and interpersonal interaction skills appropriate for both collaborative and consultative relationships in schools. Focus is on the development of these skills in interactions with both school professionals and family members of students. Particular attention is paid to the development of these skills in ways that are responsive and relevant to people from marginalized groups.
  • C&T 5095 - Memory, History and Curriculum
    This seminar will explore the role that readings of the past have in contemporary life, by historicizing history itself. We will examine issues of collective memory as it relates to the assumption of a collective in the processes of constituting identities, and we will look at schooling as a central location in the production of those identities and the dissemination of particular notions linked to the past and our ability to draw lessons from it.
  • C&T 5118 - Infant and toddler development and practice
    Theory is related to practice and research with infants, toddlers, and families. Students participate in classroom practice and meet for weekly seminar on-site at Early Childhood Centers.
  • C&T 5302 - Advanced practicum-giftedness
    Permission required. Guided experiences for advanced students in Giftedness. Supervised group field visits. Initial internships arranged. Students submit reports analyzing experiences.
  • C&T 5308 - Advanced practicum-infancy and early childhood
    Permission required. Students engage in action research at their practicum sites.
  • C&T 5502 - Introduction to qualitative research in curriculum and teaching
    Introductory seminar on methods in qualitative research, with focus on case studies in classrooms and schools.
  • C&T 5505 - Seminar: Discourses in difference
    This course will explore the epistemological orientation offered by disability studies scholarship and examine its significance for equitable schooling. Disability Studies has emerged as a strong interdisciplinary body of work that has foregrounded significance of disability rights and disability identity for a democratic orientation to schooling and society. In this course, we will examine disability as a social phenomenon as well as inquire into divergent perspectives that privilege phenomenological and interpretive approaches to the experience of disability. Course readings will include the works of disability scholars in the humanities and social sciences as well as focus on researchers in the field of education who have been informed by such scholarship. We will subsequently examine the institution of schooling through a disability studies lens and critique our educational system that is predicated on the sorting and classification of all students.
  • C&T 5506 - Seminar in gifted education
    This is a topical seminar that examines such issues as identification of gifted students in New York City schools, equity in gifted education, the effects of No Child Left Behind and Race to the Top, and whether gifted students are necessary for gifted education. Discussions by Skype with leading scholars in the field of gifted education will expose students to contemporary concerns in this field. No prior experience with or knowledge of gifted education is required.
  • C&T 5512 - Guided practice (supervision) of novice elementary and secondary teachers
    Practical and theoretical investigations and critiques of supervision and related practices (guidance, mentoring, coaching, professional development, etc.) as they are, have been, and could be undertaken. These activities are conceptualized first of all as practices of teacher education, placing evaluation and management responsibilities in the secondary position. Primary but not exclusive emphasis is on preservice teacher education. The course is designed both to support students’ current and future practice and to enhance students’ understandings of theories, purposes, and controversies in teacher education, especially teacher education committed to educational justice in the classroom. Recommended: students are responsible for guided practice/supervision concurrent with course; please confer with professor if this will not be the case.
  • C&T 5513 - Seminar in early childhood education
    Required of all second-year doctoral students in early childhood education and early childhood special education and open to other post-master's students with permission. Examination of underlying issues and currents in early child-hood education, with formulation of initial research plans.
  • C&T 5535 - Black, Latina, and Transnational Feminisms
    Over the last two decades, the fabric of American society has become increasingly rich in ethnic, linguistic, religious, and racial diversity, and it continues to diversify. Moreover, the increased migration of people, modern forms of capital, and media technologies have led to the rapid movement of ideas, and cultural and economic capital across national boundaries; this intensified globalization has compressed worldwide social relations and scholars have recognized that individuals and collectives have multiple subjectivities. Our contemporary global condition requires scholars and practitioners to engage in more nuanced, expanded, and complex ways of knowing and being. Therefore, in this course, we will engage in an interdisciplinary exploration of feminist scholarship located at the intersections of race, class, and culture.
  • C&T 5563 - Exploring Gender and Sexuality in Everyday Curriculum Practices
    This course is both a research course and an opportunity to think about curriculum. The course focus is the exploration of gender and sexuality in everyday curricular practices. The course is designed to critically engage feminist methodological approaches and challenges when asking questions about difference, gender and sexuality in education.
  • C&T 5800 - Institute: Teaching of writing
    The focus of the institute will be on the teaching of writing with the participants also working on their own writing. There will be a combination of large group presentations, small interactive sessions, and writing workshops. Separate sections will be offered for advanced participants. A partial list of topics to be covered includes: the central role of planning and curriculum development in the teaching of writing, methods for holding our students accountable for doing their best work, classroom structures that support inquiry and collaboration, and using literature to help students craft their writing. The Institute is appropriate for elementary and secondary teachers.
  • C&T 5902 - Independent study--giftedness
    Permission required. Qualified students work under guidance on practical research problems. Proposed work must be outlined prior to registration; final written report required.
  • C&T 5905 - Seminar: Discourses in difference
    Permission required. Students work in small groups under guidance on practical problems related to teacher-as-scholar practitioner, teacher-as-classroom researcher, and teacher-as-change agent. Emphasis on ethical practices for diverse learners. This capstone seminar takes a critical, socio-historical look at the field and its competing discourses in order to understand clearly the role of educator. Special fee: $25.
  • C&T 6010 - Poststructuralist Theories and Education
    The course is an introduction to some poststructuralist and feminist poststructuralist theories and their possible uses in educational research and practice. These theoretical orientations are widely used in education, in the humanities and social sciences, and in cross-disciplinary fields such as cultural studies, gender and sexuality studies, postcolonial and transnational studies, etc.
  • C&T 6011 - Introduction to qualitative research in curriculum and teaching
    Introductory seminar on methods in qualitative research, with focus on case studies in classrooms and schools.
  • C&T 6020 - Teacher Education as Transformative Activist Researcher: Inquiry in Teacher Learning
    This course is designed to prepare future teacher educators to be researchers of teacher education. We begin by analyzing how the research on teacher education has been framed (primarily in the U.S. context) and what questions have been researched. We use these to examine what questions are absent in the published studies and consider various explanations of why the research on teacher education has developed the way it has. Next, taking up a transformative, activist stance, we study various research methods and a wide variety of possible methodological tools. We use these to then design two research studies: one small-scale study examining a local pedagogical enactment; and one larger, multi-methods or longitudinal study designed to be conducted by a group.
  • C&T 6021 - Qualitative Inquiry: Data Analysis
    As the second part of the qualitative research methods sequence, this course will focus on analyzing and interpreting data after completing data collection. The purpose of this course is to systemize the analysis process in order present our findings with ethical and methodological “rigor”. We will explore topics related to: organization of data, analytic tools and strategies, interpretation and construction of meaning, and, presenting/writing up the case.
  • C&T 6025 - Teacher Educator as Transformative Activist Researcher: Inquiry in Teacher Learning
    This doctoral research course is designed to prepare future teacher educators to be researchers of teacher education. We focus on research on teacher education primarily in the U.S. contexts and examine what questions are absent in the published studies. Taking up a transformative, activist stance, we study various research methods and a wide variety of possible methodological tools. We use these to then design two research studies: one small-scale study examining a local pedagogical enactment; and one larger, mixed methods or longitudinal study designed to be conducted by a group.
  • C&T 6036 - Power and Method in Collaborative Research
    This doctoral research methodology class takes up issues of power, voice, equity, inclusion, reliability and validity while conducting collaborative research with parents, students, educators, and community members. Such projects do not release the university-based researcher from tensions, problems, dilemmas of imposition and control. Using various theories of power and authority we will unpack and problematize our motivations such as "giving people voice" and entering into collaborative inquiry projects because we want to "equalize power."
  • C&T 6100 - Theory and Inquiry in Curriculum and Teaching I
    Required of and limited to first-year Ed.D students in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching; must be taken in the fall semester in conjunction with C&T 6101; C&T 6102 is required for all first-year Ed.D students in the following spring semester. Introduction to and exploration of important problems and issues in curriculum and teaching, methods of formulating questions, and modes of inquiry appropriate to doctoral-level research.
  • C&T 6101 - Theory and Inquiry in Curriculum and Teaching II
    Required of and limited to first-year Ed.D students in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching; must be taken in the fall semester in conjunction with C&T 6100; C&T 6102 is required for all first-year Ed.D students in the following spring semester. Introduction to and exploration of important problems and issues in curriculum and teaching, methods of formulating questions, and modes of inquiry appropriate to doctoral-level research.
  • C&T 6102 - Theory and Inquiry in Curriculum and Teaching III
    Required of and limited to first-year Ed.D students in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching; must be taken in the spring semester in conjunction with C&T 6569. Introduction to and exploration of important problems and issues in curriculum and teaching, methods of formulating questions, and modes of inquiry appropriate to doctoral-level research.
  • C&T 6200 - Field study in designing curriculum and instruction
    Permission required. Field experiences in relation to designing, conducting, and evaluating programs in curriculum and instruction.
  • C&T 6400 - Internship program in curriculum research
    Permission required. Firsthand experience in a center where curriculum research is in progress.
  • C&T 6452 - Internship program in supervision and curriculum improvement: Professional
    Permission required. Prerequisite: C&T 4160 or C&T 4051. Work with curriculum leaders in an ongoing program. Fieldwork involves school system problems and leadership processes.
  • C&T 6514 - Advanced Seminar in Early Childhood Education
    Required of all second-year doctoral students in early childhood education and early childhood special education and open to other post-master's students with permission. Examination of underlying issues and currents in early child-hood education, with formulation of initial research plans.
  • C&T 6517 - Contemporary Curriculum Studies
    This course examines contemporary ideas on curriculum and forms of curricular inquiry drawn from a range of theoretical stances, including neo-Marxist, feminist, post-structuralist, postfoundational, critical race theory, and queer scholarship. In discussing particular approaches and studies, we will consider the contexts in which alternative theories of curriculum have arisen, what problems or critiques they respond to, and their usefulness in understanding concrete schooling practices and dilemmas. One topic that will be pursued in depth is the relationship between curricular knowledges (formal and informal) and student subjectivities/identities.
  • C&T 6519 - Histories, Curricula, and Current Issues in Teacher Education
    The course examines how preservice teacher education (“preparation” for future teachers of infants, children, and youth, from early childhood through secondary school) is and has been provided, organized, conceptualized, practiced, experienced, and governed at various points and in various places—and how it has been criticized, almost continually, so long as it has existed.
  • C&T 6521 - Mapping Literacy Research for Equity and Justice
    Examines research on the inequities and exclusions produced by school literacy for children and youth from minoritized communities, and explores theories and methodologies that offer new imaginaries for literacy education for equity and justice.
  • C&T 6523 - Advanced Seminar in Diversity and Equity
    Required of all doctoral students pursuing a specialization in diversity and equity and open to other post-masters students with permission. This course aims to deepen students’ understandings of educational institutions as socially and culturally situated and with histories of unequal access to academic opportunities. It will provide a platform for investigating complex and contested terms that index historical approaches in the field of curriculum and teaching--for instance, concepts such as “diversity,” “multiculturalism,” and “inclusion.” Students will explore the trajectories of such perspectives as well as the associated tensions in order to question, reframe, and interrupt dominant ideologies of schooling. This will entail troubling ideas about whose knowledge counts, and learning from legacies of community struggles for educational equity.
  • C&T 6525 - Learning to Teach and Teacher Education: Vanities and Visions, Dilemmas and Choices
    The primary agenda of this course is critical investigation of a foundational question for teacher education: What is to be learned when teaching is learned? A related, similar, but arguably not symmetrical question is: When persons are taught to teach, what are they (to be) taught? Both questions bring forward in turn: Why, and to what ends?
  • C&T 6530 - Advanced Seminar: Configurations of Gender and Sexuality in Education
    This advanced course explores current theoretical scholarship around gender and sexuality studies in and out of education. The course builds on initial coursework in gender and sexuality and is intended to help doctoral students understand different theoretical and empirical approaches.
  • C&T 6532 - Seminar in reading/language arts and related research
    Permission required. Open only to advanced master's and doctoral students with a specialization in literacy or a related area who have completed recent methods courses in literacy. In-depth study and discussion of trends and issues in literacy development and instruction.
  • C&T 6535 - Freire Culture Circles: Critical Pedagogy in Action
    This seminar is designed for doctoral students in education who are interested in critical pedagogy. In addition to engaging with the work of Paulo Freire, students will have the opportunity to critically problematize education inequities from a Freirean perspective, through culture circles. Students and instructor will work dialogically as a community to name, unpack, deconstruct, and reconceptualize historical and contemporary issues in education. This will entail reading the world and engaging in critical problem posing collectively.
  • C&T 6540 - Culturally Responsive Research
    This course is based on models of former Spencer collaborative doctoral research seminars in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching which provided students with hands-on research experience. The overall goal in this course is for students to individually and collectively engage in conceptualizing and understanding how to conduct culturally responsive research in urban contexts, and to engage in data analysis to support the development of proposal writing. Specifically, students will learn how to use grounded theory to analyze interview data about African immigrants' lived experiences in schools, in families, and engagement in their communities.
  • C&T 6545 - Critically Analyzing Classroom Talk
    From a critical perspective, this course engages students in reading research that investigates the role of classroom talk in teaching and learning. In addition to reading research, students will have the opportunity to engage in critical discourse analysis of real classroom data. As a community of learners, students and instructor will practice and critique methods for analyzing classroom discourse data and develop a critical meta-awareness of our own language use and role in schooling and society.
  • C&T 6560 - Critical Race Theory in Education
    This course aims to help students explore and understand Critical Race Theory (CRT) as an analytical framework for studying inequities in education broadly defined--in pre/schools, community settings, etc. It provides a platform for investigating race-based epistemologies, methodologies, and pedagogies.
  • C&T 6569 - Seminar in theory and research in curriculum
    Permission required. Critical study of classroom environment as a laboratory for teacher education.
  • C&T 6900 - Directed research and theory development in curriculum and teaching
    Permission required.
  • C&T 7500 - Dissertation seminar in curriculum and teaching
    Two semesters required of all doctoral candidates in the department unless proposal is defended in the first semester. Development of doctoral dissertations and presentation of proposals for approval.
  • C&T 8900 - Dissertation advisement in curriculum and teaching
    Individual advisement on doctoral dissertations. Fee to equal 3 points at current tuition rate for each term. For requirements, see section in catalog on Continuous Registration for Ed.D. degree.
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