Biobehavioral Sciences

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The Department of Biobehavioral Sciences


Our Mission

The Department of Biobehavioral Sciences offers programs that focus on the application of the biological, physiological, behavioral, and sociocultural sciences underlying human communication, movement, and their disorders to clinical, educational, and community settings. An understanding of the normal and abnormal biobehavioral processes is applied to clinical practice. The scientific knowledge obtained from studying each of these specialized fields is used to enhance the educational, adaptive, and communicative capabilities of individuals with normal and impaired abilities across the lifespan.

Graduates of our master’s programs assume professional roles in educational, health-related, and community agency settings as speech-language pathologists, exercise physiologists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, and research coordinators. As these professionals often work in interdisciplinary teams, the department facilitates opportunities for students to interact across professional boundaries.

Our doctoral graduates are prepared for university faculty positions and administrative positions in clinical, educational, and organizational field-based settings. They may also pursue careers in research.

The department maintains clinics and laboratories to support the teaching and research components of the programs. These facilities include the Edward D. Mysak Speech and Hearing Center, as well as laboratories in applied physiology, motor learning, kinematics, language and cognition, and adaptive communication technologies. 

The master’s degree program in Communication Sciences and Disorders is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).

If you plan to work in a state other than New York, Teachers College has not made a determination if our programs meet the educational requirements for certification or professional licensure in any other state, Washington DC, or Puerto Rico. We recommend that you review the state’s licensing board or teacher certification website for that state’s qualifications. The Office of Teacher Education will complete any necessary forms and/or letters for out-of-state certification on the completion of your approved teacher preparation program.

Programs

Faculty

  • Faculty

    • Laura Azzarito Professor of Physical Culture and Education
    • Catherine J Crowley Professor of Practice
    • Lisa A Edmonds Associate Professor in Communication Sciences and Disorders
    • Karen Froud Associate Professor of Neuroscience and Education
    • Carol Ewing Garber Professor of Movement Sciences
    • Andrew Michael Gordon Professor of Movement Sciences
    • Peter Gordon Associate Professor of Neuroscience and Education
    • Carol J Hammer Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Vice Dean for Research
    • Erika Shield Levy Professor in Communication and Science Disorders
    • Kimberly G Noble Professor of Neuroscience and Education
    • Lori Quinn Professor of Movement Science and Kinesiology
    • Michelle Shevon Troche Associate Professor of Speech and Language Pathology
  • Visiting Faculty

    • Aimee Marie Layton Adj/PTVisiting Prof/PTLecturer
    • Jonathan Michael Oliver Adj/PTVisiting Prof/PTLecturer
  • Emeriti

    • Ronald DeMeersman Professor Emeritus of Applied Physiology and Education
    • John H. Saxman Professor Emeritus of Speech and Language Pathology
    • Stephen Silverman Professor Emeritus of Education
  • Lecturers

    • Mindy Kalya Feldman Hecht Lecturer in Applied Physiology
    • Lisa Merideth Levinson Lecturer
    • Panagiota Demetra Tampakis Lecturer in Communication Science and Disorders
  • Adjunct Faculty

    • Stefanie Blanco Adjunct Assistant in CSD
    • James A Curtis Adjunct Assistant Professor
    • Julie Beth Fineman Adjunct Assistant Professor
    • Paul Michael Gallo Adjunct Associate Professor
    • Richard Magill Adjunct Professor
    • Dominic John Mentor Adjunct Assistant Professor
    • Anlys Olivera Adjunct Associate Professor
    • Nicholas Lee Parker Adjunct Assistant Professor in Movement Science
    • Sharon Rose Phillips Student Teacher Supervisor
    • Shirit Chaia-Rivka Rosenberg Adjunct Assistant Professor
    • Stephen Alan Sands Adjunct Professor
    • Alexis Nicole Sidiropoulos Adjunct Assistant Professor in Movement Science 111714-6132
    • Matthew A. Stults-Kolehmainen Adjunct Associate Professor
  • Instructors

    • Suzanne Lori Abrams Clinic Supervisor
    • Maria Louise Blanco Fee-based Instructor in CSD
    • James Christopher Borders Part Time Instructor
    • Megen Elaine Evans Student Teacher Supervisor
    • Bernadine Rae Gagnon Assistant Director of Edward D. Mysak Clinic for Communication Disorders and Placement Coordinator
    • Joanna Marie Hokenson Part Time Instructor
    • Adrianna Keener-Denoia Part Time Instructor in Applied Physiolgy
    • Jacqueline Montes
    • Paula V Pineda Chief Clinical Supervisor
    • Jaclyn Nichol Rubinstein Part Time Instructor
    • Anna Elyse Silberman Part Time Instructor
    • Paul Joseph Smith Research Scientist
    • Gail Simon Socolof Fee Based Instructor
    • Michael Anthony Soupios Part Time Instructor
    • Ashleigh P. Wishen Instructional Staff/Fee Based Instructor

Courses

  • BBS 4032 - Neuroscience of Speech and Language
    This is a 2-credit course that provides an introductory overview of the neuroanatomical and neurophysiological correlates of aspects of speech, language, and cognition, with an introduction to disorders of communication related to neurologic impairments due to various etiologies. Students will learn through assigned reading, lectures, discussion, class participation, guided self-study, review sessions, discussion and case study review, with a focus on neurological underpinnings of communication disorders.
  • BBS 4035 - Clinical Practice in the Medical Setting
    Prerequisite: BBS 4032. This course introduces the student to principles and clinical practices of rehabilitation specialists within the medical setting. Students will be introduced to various types of healthcare settings and the healthcare professionals whom they will encounter within the medical practice. Medical terminology and documentation will be reviewed. Additionally, students will be exposed to basic clinical information on assessment and treatment of complex patients with communication and swallowing difficulties seen within medical environments. Success in this course requires a strong foundation in Neuroscience.
  • BBS 5060 - Neuromuscular responses and adaptation to exercise
    A review of the physiology of muscle contraction in addition to in-depth discussion of topics related to the field which include: the relationship between muscle activation and respiration during exercise, muscle fatigue, eccentric versus concentric contractions and adaptation to strength training.
  • BBS 5068 - No Title Found in Banner
    An introduction to communication within the nervous system and functional brain neuroanatomy. Examination of chemical circuits in the brain and associated pathologies, such as Parkinson's disease, Tourettes, schizophrenia, depression, and anxiety.
  • BBS 5069 - Brain and behavior II: Perception, emotion, memory and cognition
    An introduction to brain processes associated with perception, emotion, memory and cognition. Consequences of damage to these neurobehavioral processes are examined through reading and discussion of clinical case studies. This course is offered after Spring Break following on from BBS 5068 (Brain and Behavior I: Anatomy and Physiology). Students normally take the two courses in sequence for a total of 3 points, which are distributed across the two courses (2+1 or 1+2). The same main textbook is used across the two courses.
  • BBS 6042 - Grant Writing: From a Fundable Idea Through Review
    This course targets grant fundamentals from the beginning of the writing process through the review process. Focus is placed on funding mechanisms available through the National Institutes of Health, Institute of Education Sciences and National Science Foundation as well as private foundations. The course covers writing key areas of research proposals; developing biosketches, budgets and supplemental materials; and the review and resubmission process.
  • BBSN 4001 - Foundations in Neuroscience I: Anatomy & Physiology
    This course is an introduction to the mammalian nervous system, emphasizing the structure and function of the human brain. It provides foundational knowledge for students with little or no background in neuroscience and an essential review for students with limited course work in neuroscience. Topics to be covered include the history of neuroscience, the function of brain cells, intra- and intercellular communication, and the anatomy of the human nervous system. This course takes a Flipped Learning approach to introduce the mammalian nervous system, emphasizing the structure and function of the human brain. It provides foundational knowledge for students with little or no background in neuroscience and an essential review for students with coursework in neuroscience. Topics to be covered include the history of neuroscience, the function of brain cells, intra- and intercellular communication, and the anatomy of the human nervous system. This course incorporates online lectures to emphasize essential topics from the text, weekly quizzes to support students’ consolidation of material and gauge comprehension, in-class discussions to extend topics covered, discussion follow-up work, and group projects. You should expect to spend 7 to 10 hours each week outside of class engaging with course content.
  • BBSN 4002 - Foundations in Neuroscience II: Systems Neuroscience
    This course is a continuation of the Foundations in Neuroscience series, and is intended for students who have completed Foundations I: Neuroanatomy & Physiology. The topics to be covered include the visual system, the auditory system, the somatosensory system, motor movement, chemical control of brain & behavior, and memory. This course takes a flipped learning approach, incorporating a weekly online lecture that emphasizes essential topics from the textbook alongside weekly quizzes to support students’ consolidation of material and gauge comprehension. In-class discussions and activities extend topics covered and involve follow-up discussion work. Group projects are assigned to support collaborative learning. You should expect to spend 7 to 10 hours each week outside of class engaging with course content.
  • BBSN 4005 - Research Methods in Neuroscience
    This course is intended to provide an overview of the scientific methods used in the field of neuroscience. We will be discussing the basic tenets of experimental design and statistical analysis as they are used by all behavioral and cognitive scientists. We also will work to apply those design and analysis concepts to the specific methodologies used by neuroscientists.
  • BBSN 4904 - Research practicum and independent study: Neuroscience and Education
    Students may register for this course if they are involved in a practicum experience such as working in a lab, an educational setting, or clinical treatment setting doing research independently, such as research toward writing the thesis. The course also covers students who are taking external workshops such as the functional MRI training at MGH's Martinos Center. Registration is for 0 to 3 credits depending on the level of commitment and/ or financial constraints; registering for zero credits is at no tuition cost to the student. Students should consult with their advisor prior to registration.
  • BBSN 5000 - Electroencephalography (EEG) Lab Methods
    This course provides basic understanding of electroencephalography (EEG) and event-related potential (ERP) methods as they are used in investigations of language and cognitive processes. The course covers the neurophysiology of EEG, principles of experiment design, and some methods for preliminary data processing.
  • BBSN 5003 - Cognitive Neuroscience
    This course reviews the history of cognitive neuroscience, provides an overview of the structure & function of the nervous system, and delves into the methods used to investigate the cognitive and neural processes that support visual object recognition, attention, language, memory, and cognitive control. We will consider evidence from healthy study participants as well as patients with neurological disorders. Students will be introduced to relevant theoretical perspectives and converging evidence for each covered topic. Students will work both independently and collaboratively to gain a deeper understanding of the topics covered by synthesizing the extant literature.
  • BBSN 5005 - Evaluation of Neuropsychological Instruments for Research
    This course will examine various neuropsychological testing instruments and their role in research and the evaluation of neuropsychological disorders in children and adults. The course will focus on the basic theoretical and clinical foundations of neuropsychological testing.
  • BBSN 5007 - Neuroscience Applications to Education
    This course will survey the application of current neuroscience research to educational practice. We will discuss how neuroscience can (and cannot) inform current pedagogical methodologies, including neuroethical issues as they pertain to education, as well as educational “neuromyths.” We will cover the neural bases of selected cognitive and academic systems (including literacy, math, and self-regulation), as well as the current science of intervention in these domains. We discuss experience-based brain plasticity across a variety of contexts (sleep, physical activity, stress, bilingualism, socioeconomic status, music exposure). Finally, we will discuss the future of neuroeducational research and policy. Throughout the course, we focus on the ability to evaluate, critique, and interpret scientific evidence as it relates to educational practice and policy.
  • BBSN 5010 - Neuroscience of Reading
    This course is an introduction to the neuroscience of reading, its development, and disorders. We will contemplate questions about the reading brain, including: What is reading? How do we make meaning of marks on a page? How does language development support reading development? What is the significance of this technology to society? How do we study the reading brain? What goes on in the brain when learning to read and in skilled readers? What is or isn't happening in the brains of children who struggle to read? We will consider theoretical frameworks and how they provide a foundation for discussing the neurological underpinnings of sub-processes supporting reading. Experimental findings from neuroscience and cognitive neuroscience will be reviewed and evaluated. The insights gathered from this work will help build an understanding of the sub-processes supporting reading across a lifespan and among linguistic communities. We will also review how developmental and acquired reading disorders have contributed to our understanding of the reading brain and its implications for instruction.
  • BBSN 5019 - Human Functional Neuroanatomy
    This hybrid course will review neuroanatomical terminology and identify structure and function of major landmarks and pathways in the human brain, peripheral nervous system, and spinal cord using clinical cases, MRI images, brain models, and preserved human brain specimens. We will also discuss neurological disorders and pathology as is relevant to each structure.
  • BBSN 5022 - Eye Tracking Methods
    This course aims to explore the applications, methods, neurophysiology, and psychometrics associated with the use of eye tracking in cognitive, linguistic, developmental and clinical research. Students will learn to use TOBII eye trackers and will explore the use of other head mounted systems as well. Students will design, run and analyze an experiment employing these technologies. In addition, we will learn to use other dynamic event recording systems, including ELAN, MACSHAPA/DATAVYU, PRAAT and CHILDES. These systems are designed for coding video, sound, speech, language and other event based data sets. We will also explore the contents of the shared datasets on CHILDES and DATABERY (as it comes on line).
  • BBSN 5033 - Cognitive Neuroscience
    Faculty. Permission required. Prerequisite: HBSK 4075 or equivalent. Cognitive and emotional disorders associated with particular brain functions or locations.
  • BBSN 5044 - Current Issues in Neuroscience and Education
    This course features a series of synchronous Zoom talks by visiting speakers presenting their cutting-edge neuroscientific research. The course introduces graduate students to a range of topics and researchers. The format provides an opportunity for students to engage directly with scientists in a professional arena. For each talk, students will be required to read background papers that describe aspects of the work presented by a visiting speaker. Assigned groups will submit questions/topics of interest for discussion after the talks. Every couple of weeks, the class will meet via Zoom for a "live" discussion. Lecture topics seek to expand student exposure to a diversity of neuroscientific research. Assignments encourage reflection on the topics presented and how the material covered contributes to a deeper understanding of neuroscience more generally.
  • BBSN 5070 - Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
    This course examines neurophysical development from conception through adulthood and its relation to changes in cognitive and linguistic functioning. Topics include visual development, attention, development of action/motor systems, language and reading development, executive function, and social cognition. In addition, the course covers developmental disorders related to specific cognitive, linguistic, and social functions, and theoretical approaches to mental representation and the emergence of cognitive functions.
  • BBSN 5080 - Affective Neuroscience
    Emotion and cognition have traditionally been studied in isolation from one another, but these processes typically interact with each other in interesting and unique ways. Understanding these interactions is critical to understanding human behavior: affect can modulate our attention, guide our decision making, bias our perception, and influence our memories. Affective neuroscience utilizes the tools typically used to study cognitive neuroscience to better understand how emotion interacts with these and other aspects of cognition.
  • BBSN 5122 - Psychoneuroimmunology
    Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) is a field that integrates behavioral sciences, cellular neuroscience, endocrinology, and immunology to explain how immune-brain interactions can affect health and behaviors. The course will begin by introducing the principles of neuroscience, immunology, endocrinology, and research methods in PNI. We will then survey foundational work and current research related to brain-immune interactions and how they influence health and disease including topics that are relevant to cognitive neuroscience and education such as learning, memory, and cognitive disorders.
  • BBSN 5152 - Neuroscience, Ethics, and the Law
    As our ability to measure and understand the functioning of the human brain has rapidly advanced, so too has our need to grapple with the ethical and legal implications of these neuroscientific tools and discoveries. This seminar will introduce students to the emerging fields of Neuroethics and Neurolaw and create a forum for discussion and debate about a range of timely topics. Topics will include brain development in adolescence (related to issues of driving laws, school start times, and adolescents being tried as adults in courts of law); the use of neuroimaging as “brain reading” technology (and its applicability in court); the neurobiology of memory and its legal application; the use of neuropharmacological agents and brain stimulation for cognitive enhancement; the neurobiology of addiction (and implications for the voluntary control of behavior); and death, unconsciousness, and the law. Throughout the course, we focus on the ability to evaluate, critique and interpret scientific evidence as it relates to ethical and legal practice and policy. With each topic we consider, our goal will not be to achieve consensus on what’s right and what’s wrong but rather to understand the ethical quandaries and to think critically about ways that the field could go about addressing them. Students should leave this course with an enhanced appreciation of the many ways in which our work impacts society and a heightened commitment to public engagement.
  • BBSN 5193 - Neuroscience of Adversity
    This course will survey the state-of-the-art research into what happens to our brains following the experience of adversity. We will consider adversity broadly defined, including common forms of adversity such as poverty, as well as more extreme forms of adversity, such as abuse and institutionalization. We will consider adversity across the lifespan and will also focus on plasticity and resilience. Throughout this course, we focus on the ability to evaluate, critique, and interpret scientific evidence as it relates to the neuroscience of adversity.
  • BBSN 5500 - Neuroscience & Ed Thesis & Professional Development
    The goal of BBSN 5500 is to provide a structured approach to writing the thesis. Class meetings involve lectures on selecting and refining thesis topics, writing different sections of an academic paper, APA format and stylistic conventions, and grammar. Students make several presentations on their work over the course of the semester and provide substantive feedback to their peers. Once thesis drafts are completed, the course focuses on best practices for designing poster and professional presentations based on thesis work. This course requires a minimum of 36 hours per week of out of classroom work.
  • BBSN 5575 - Integrative seminar in neuroscience and education
    Primarily for students in the Neuroscience and Education program during preparation of the master's integrative project. Others by permission.
  • BBSN 5904 - Research and independent study: Neuroscience and Education
    Independent research. This course requires a minimum of 36 hours per week of out-of-classroom work.
  • BBSN 6904 - Research and independent study: Neuroscience and Education
    Research and independent study.
  • BBSQ 4010 - Grammar Fundamentals for a Pluralistic Society
    Pre-requisites: None. This course teaches fundamental features of American English grammar including those features several varieties of English.
  • BBSQ 4030 - Speech science
    Pre-requisites: No prerequisites, but knowledge of speech articulation and the International Phonetic Alphabet is helpful. This course examines the production, transmission, and perception of speech and discusses applications to communication disorders and to second-language speech communication.
  • BBSQ 4031 - Anatomy and physiology for speech, language, and hearing
    This course teaches the basic structures and functions of the articulatory, vocal, respiratory, and nervous systems and applies this information to the field of speech-language pathology and audiology.
  • BBSQ 4042 - Audiology
    This course covers acoustics, anatomy, and physiology of the auditory system, pure tone and speech audiometry, types and communication effects of hearing loss, amplification, and immittance.
  • BBSQ 4046 - Introduction to augmentative and alternative communication
    This introductory course will provide a comprehensive overview of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). A thorough examination of the assessment and therapeutic processes will be presented. Emphasis will be placed upon individuals exhibiting severe communication disorders secondary to congenital/acquired cognitive and motor impairments. Low- and high-tech AAC systems will be discussed and demonstrated.
  • BBSQ 4047 - Early motor behaviors in children: Normal and abnormal
    Study of normal and abnormal development of sensory-motor speech processes and related oral motor behaviors; etiology, diagnosis, and management of pre-speech and eating pathologies in infants and severely handicapped individuals from an early intervention perspective.
  • BBSQ 4900 - Rsch-Indp Stdy-Lng-Sp Path-Aud
    Instructor's Approval Required.
  • BBSQ 5003 - Literacy Development and Disorders: Assessment and Intervention
    The course prepares students who are studying to become speech-language pathologists to support the literacy abilities of children who are at risk for or have reading disorders. The course covers key areas in the development, assessment, and intervention of children’s reading abilities. Topics covered include emergent literacy, book reading, vocabulary, phonological sensitivity, reading comprehension, fluency, and decoding in monolingual and bilingual children.
  • BBSQ 5009 - Cognitive disorders
    This class provides a comprehensive overview of traumatic brain injury, right hemisphere disorders, and dementia. Theoretical, practical, and evidence-based approaches to assessment and intervention will be presented.
  • BBSQ 5041 - School speech-language-hearing programs
    Analyzes the impact of federal and state laws on service delivery in school setting. Develops skills to meet the needs of students with communication-disorders with the full range of disabilities, including working with other professionals to assist children in accessing the general curriculum.
  • BBSQ 5044 - Speech and language perception and processing
    CSD Majors take course for 2 points only. Examination of the models proposed to explain speech perception and discussion of the research that assigns a special role to speech and language.
  • BBSQ 5111 - Assessment and evaluation
    Prerequisites: A course in normal language development and a course in Language Disorders in Children. Examines how to provide evidence-based and culturally and linguistically appropriate disability evaluations with a focus on birth through 21 disability evaluations under the federal law. Students acquire knowledge and skills in standardized tests, alternative assessment approaches, and dynamic assessment, covering the full range of disabilities.
  • BBSQ 5112 - Articulation and Phonological Disorders
    Prerequisite: Phonetics course. Study of phonological rule disorders and disorders associated with functional and various structural problems in children. Critical analysis of research in assessment and treatment.
  • BBSQ 5113 - Voice disorders
    Study of voice disorders associated with functional, structural, endocrinological, and neurological problems. Analysis of recent research and evidence-based approaches to voice therapy. Prerequisite: BBSQ 4031 or equivalent.
  • BBSQ 5114 - Stuttering and Other Fluency Disorders
    This course examines the nature of stuttering and other fluency disorders across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on assessment, intervention, and prevention.
  • BBSQ 5115 - Language disorders in children
    Prerequisite: A course in normal language development. Language disorders in children, including native English speakers and children from culturally and linguistically diverse homes, covering the full range of disabilities. Course covers birth through late adolescence and includes impact of language disorders on language acquisition, literacy development, and uses of technology.
  • BBSQ 5116 - Language disorders in adults
    Prerequisite: BBS 4032 Neuroscience or equivalent. Theoretical and practical approaches to understanding the etiology, assessment, classification, and treatment of aphasia and other communication disorders in adulthood.
  • BBSQ 5118 - No Title Found in Banner
    Explores the role of the speech-language pathologist on the cleft palate team and in international practice. Develops knowledge and skills needed by the SLP to address communication and feeding issues associated with cleft palate and other craniofacial disorders.
  • BBSQ 5119 - Alaryngeal speech
    Survey of medical and surgical treatments for laryngeal carcinoma. Analysis of physiologic, acoustic, and psychosocial aspects of alaryngeal speech. Study of therapeutic methods.
  • BBSQ 5120 - Communication disorders in bilingual/bicultural children
    Studies effect of bilingualism, bilingual education, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics and multicultural perspectives in education on children and adolescents. Considers appropriate assessment and treatment to ensure optimal academic success for dual language learners and multidialectal students by providing culturally and linguistically appropriate services, covering the full range of disabilities.
  • BBSQ 5125 - Aural Habilitation
    Prerequisite: BBSQ 4042 Audiology or equivalent. This class examines clinical procedures available to audiologists, speech pathologists, and deaf educators for implementing speech-reading, auditory training, and speech-language therapy for the hard-of-hearing child. Use of amplification and counseling approaches.
  • BBSQ 5129 - Audiological concepts and principles
    Prerequisite: BBSQ 4042 Audiology or equivalent. This course covers auditory pathologies, electrophysiological (ABR), and electracoustical (OAE) tests. Tests of central auditory function, controversial issues in audition.
  • BBSQ 5130 - Assessment and intervention in dysphagia
    Prerequisite: BBSQ 4031 or equivalent, previous course addressing neurological bases of communication/upper airway dysfunction. This class examines clinical practice in swallowing and feeding disorders in children and adults. Normal and abnormal development and mature function assessment and treatment.
  • BBSQ 5131 - Dysphagia Clinic
    This clinical course aims to offer hands-on experience in the development and implementation of assessment and intervention plans for adults with swallowing disorders. Students will participate in detailed discussion about each patient’s case history, and under supervision by the Professor, they will complete a comprehensive diagnostic evaluation and treatment plan. Discussion of each patient’s progress and short case-study presentations will complete this comprehensive clinical course.
  • BBSQ 5210 - Practicum in school speech-language pathology
    Assessment and Intervention planning and implementation for school age clients across the full range of disabilities. Practice in speech and language pathology at related field facilities. Majors enroll until practicum requirements for the M.S. degree are completed.
  • BBSQ 5211 - Practicum in school speech-language pathology (Spring)
    Assessment and Intervention planning and implementation for school age clients across the full range of disabilities. Practice in speech and language pathology at related field facilities. Majors enroll until practicum requirements for the M.S. degree are completed.
  • BBSQ 5212 - Practicum in school speech-language pathology (Summer)
    Participation and student teaching in a school remedial speech and hearing program: survey, organization, remedial procedures. Special fee: $150.
  • BBSQ 5312 - No Title Found in Banner
    Prerequisite: BBSQ 5111 Assessment and evaluation. Assessment planning and implementation for clients across the full range of disabilities and across the lifespan. Methods of assessing native English speakers and culturally and linguistically diverse clients.
  • BBSQ 5315 - Therapy Practicum
    Summer A: Assessment and intervention planning and implementation for clients across the full range of disabilities and across the lifespan. Observation and practice in speech and language pathology at the Edward D. Mysak Clinic for Communication Disorders and at related field facilities. Majors enroll until practicum requirements for the M.S. degree are completed.
  • BBSQ 5316 - Therapy Practicum
    Summer B: Assessment and intervention planning and implementation for clients across the full range of disabilities and across the lifespan. Observation and practice in speech and language pathology at the Edward D. Mysak Clinic for Communication Disorders and at related field facilities. Majors enroll until practicum requirements for the M.S. degree are completed.
  • BBSQ 5331 - Clinic 1 (Entry Group Therapy Practicum I)
    Assessment and intervention planning and implementation for clients across the full range of disabilities and across the lifespan. Practice in speech and language pathology at the Edward D. Mysak Clinic for Communication Disorders and/or related field facilities. Majors enroll until practicum requirements for the M.S. degree are completed.
  • BBSQ 5332 - Therapy Practicum: Regular clinic
    Assessment and intervention planning and implementation for clients across the full range of disabilities and across the lifespan. Observation and practice in speech and language pathology at the Edward D. Mysak Clinic for Communication Disorders and at related field facilities. Majors enroll until practicum requirements for the M.S. degree are completed.
  • BBSQ 5333 - Therapy Practicum: Laboratory methods and instrumentation in clinical practice
    Instruction and practice in acoustic and physiologic measures related to voice, articulation, and fluency disorders. Majors must enroll for one term. Special fee: $150.
  • BBSQ 5335 - Therapy Practicum: Infant evaluation clinic
    Observation and participation in the evaluation of pre-speech and feeding behaviors in at-risk infants and in the development of individualized management programs.
  • BBSQ 5336 - Therapy Practicum: Stuttering clinic
    Prerequisite: BBSQ 5114 Stuttering or equivalent. Observation and discussion of assessment, remediation, and prevention of fluency disorders. Special fee $150.
  • BBSQ 5337 - Practicum transcultural speech-language pathology
    This practicum is required for all students traveling to Bolivia or Ghana for the International Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology.
  • BBSQ 5343 - Hearing measurement
    Practice in hearing screening, audiological evaluation, and aural rehabilitation issues across the lifespan.
  • BBSQ 5501 - Seminar in Transcultural SLP (Latin America)
    This course is required for students who go on the international trip to Latin America. It covers cultural, linguistic, and socioeconomic issues and how those relate to the provision of speech-language pathology services in the country and region.
  • BBSQ 5502 - Transcultural seminar
    This seminar is required for all students who travel to Ghana for the International Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology.
  • BBSQ 5815 - Pediatric dysphagia, birth to 21
    The course will cover dysphagia across pediatric ages, birth to 21, and as it is evaluated and treated in four pediatric settings--the neonatal intensive care unit, early intervention, pre-schools, and schools. This course cannot be used as a replacement for the program requirement, BBSQ 5130, Dysphagia Assessment and Management. It is a good elective for students interested in pediatrics, those who will be working in school settings, and those interested particularly in dysphagia.
  • BBSQ 5820 - Bilingual SLP Extension Institute
    The Bilingual SLP Extension Institute is for non-matriculated students who are speech-language-pathologists or holders of the NYSED Teachers of Speech and Language Disabilities (TSSLD) or the Teachers of Speech and Hearing Handicapped (TSHH). It is comprised of two 3-credit courses that meet the academic and clinical requirements of the NYSED bilingual extension certificate. All students receive an "Advanced Certificate in Bilingual Speech-Language Pathology." Students acquire the knowledge and skills to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate services for all students with a focus on dual language learners. The institute is available both online and in-person.
  • BBSQ 5940 - Evaluating Research in Speech-Language Pathology
    Evaluation of research methods and the interpretation of research leading to evidence-based practice approaches.
  • BBSQ 5941 - Research Needs & Methods for Doctoral Students
    Rotation in lab conducting complementary research, to result in a product (manuscript, measure, presentation). Taught by core doctoral faculty.
  • BBSQ 6351 - Advanced practice: Clinical
    Doctoral students are required to register in four sections during their period of candidacy. Observation of faculty during therapy, diagnosis, supervisory, teaching, or research activities and participation in such activities.
  • BBSQ 6352 - Advanced practice: Supervision
    Doctoral students are required to register in four sections during their period of candidacy. Observation of faculty during therapy, diagnosis, supervisory, teaching, or research activities and participation in such activities.
  • BBSQ 6353 - Advanced practice: Teaching
    This course covers the teaching requirement for doctoral students. For this requirement, doctoral students take full or partial responsibility for teaching a course at Teachers College or elsewhere. They design or redesign the class syllabus and assignments and develop and teach at least half of the class sessions under the guidance of a faculty member.
  • BBSQ 6354 - Advanced practice: Laboratory
    Doctoral students are required to register in four sections during their period of candidacy. Observation of faculty during therapy, diagnosis, supervisory, teaching, or research activities and participation in such activities.
  • BBSQ 6355 - Advanced practice: Administration
    Doctoral students are required to register in four sections during their period of candidacy. Observation of faculty during therapy, diagnosis, supervisory, teaching, or research activities and participation in such activities.
  • BBSQ 6514 - Language: Brain, biology and language acquisition
    For doctoral candidates and advanced master's degree students in speech-language pathology. Doctoral candidates are required to enroll in at least three sections of seminars in the BBSQ 6513-6517 series. Seminars involve intensive study and analysis of current research and issues in the particular topics.
  • BBSQ 6516 - Seminar on Fluency and its disorders
    For doctoral candidates and advanced master's degree students in speech-language pathology. Doctoral candidates are required to enroll in at least three sections of seminars in the BBSQ 6513-6517 series. Seminars involve intensive study and analysis of current research and issues in the particular topics.
  • BBSQ 6517 - Neuropathology of speech
    The purpose of this course is to provide a strong foundation in assessment and management of motor speech disorders in children and adults. We will explore acquired and progressive disorders of the motor speech system from neurological, theoretical, and clinical perspectives. Clinical research in the field will be reviewed and best assessment and management/treatment practices will be discussed. For doctoral students, the course will also address the development of their dissertation study (literature review, research questions, design). Doctoral students must ask the instructor for permission to be in the course. Success in this course requires a strong foundation in speech science (or equivalent, e.g., an acoustic phonetics class) and knowledge of neurological bases of speech production –Prerequisites: BBSQ 4030 or equivalent, and previous course on neurological bases of speech.
  • BBSQ 6900 - Rsch Indp Stdy-Lng-Sp Path-Aud
    Rsch Indp Stdy-Lng-Sp Path-Aud
  • BBSQ 6940 - Supervised research in speech-language pathology and audiology
    Prerequisite: BBSQ 5941 Research methods. Doctoral candidates are required to enroll in their advisor's section for both semesters. Opportunity to design and conduct pilot studies and projects.
  • BBSQ 6941 - Supervised research in speech-language pathology and audiology
    Prerequisite: BBSQ 5941 Research methods. Doctoral candidates are required to enroll in their advisor's section for both semesters. Opportunity to design and conduct pilot studies and projects.
  • BBSQ 7500 - Dissertation seminar in speech-language pathology and audiology
    Prerequisite BBSQ 6941 Supervised research. Development of doctoral dissertations and projects and presentation of plans for approval. Doctoral candidates are required to enroll for one year and must begin the sequence in the fall term immediately following completion of BBSQ 6941.
  • BBSQ 8900 - Dissertation-advisement in speech-language pathology and audiology
    Prerequisite: BBSQ 7500 Dissertation seminar. Individual advisement on doctoral dissertations. Fee to equal 3 points at current tuition rate for each term. For requirements, see section in catalog on Continuous Registration for Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.
  • BBSR 4001 - Qualitative Research Methods in Biobehavioral Sciences
    The course provides students with techniques and strategies for collecting, analyzing, and reporting data from a qualitative perspective. Students will be able to consider various research issues when working with different populations in various contexts, such as schools, clinical settings, health contexts, families, communities, or other organizations.
  • BBSR 4002 - Visual Methods and Education
    This seminar-style course has been designed to help students develop a critical understanding and appreciation of the theory, methodology, and foundation ofqualitative visual research methods in an applied context.
  • BBSR 4005 - Applied anatomy and biomechanics
    Topics include: gross anatomy and function of human skeletal and muscular systems, mechanics of human movement, and analysis of skills in dance and physical education. Designed primarily for students without a prior course in anatomy or biomechanics. Students will be expected to participate in a laboratory offered immediately preceding the scheduled class time. Lab fee: $50.
  • BBSR 4050 - Biomechanical analysis of human movement
    Permission required. Covers the principles and techniques required to analyze human movement, which can be used to develop practical research questions. Quantitative and qualitative techniques for analysis of movement are discussed in relation to the study of learning, motor control, motor development, and motor impairments.
  • BBSR 4054 - Human Anatomy and Physiology
    This is an introductory survey course of the anatomy of major organ systems and their physiology. Suitable for a wide variety of professionals in fields that involve science, movement sciences, kinesiology, nursing, health, nutrition, and the arts.
  • BBSR 4060 - Motor learning
    This course is designed to acquaint the student with principles associated with the acquisition and motor control of functional movement skills. Principles and theories will provide the student with selected concepts of skill development and a framework for their application in clinical practice, coaching and teaching.
  • BBSR 4070 - Introduction to the psychosocial aspects of sport and exercise
    The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an in-depth and comprehensive understanding of the psychological and social processes in exercise, sport, and physical activity. The focus is on the key theoretical psychosocial principles that are well known to govern exercise and sport behavior, including the physical, affective, and cognitive aspects. The course explores theoretical, methodological, and applied approaches to a variety of topics including stress, cognition, mood, emotion, perceptions of the self, mental illness, exercise adherence, drug use and addiction, self-regulation and self-control, motivation, goal setting, arousal and performance, group dynamics, coaching, and burnout.
  • BBSR 4080 - Constructivist Pedagogies in Physical Education
    Constructivist pedagogies in Physical Education
  • BBSR 4090 - Physical fitness, weight control, and relaxation
    Contributions of exercise to human well-being throughout life. Classroom, gymnasium, and laboratory experiences included. Designed for teachers, counselors, and others who desire an introduction to basic concepts of physical fitness.
  • BBSR 4095 - Applied physiology I
    Prerequisite: a course in human physiology. Physiological bases of exercise. Lectures concerning the effects of exercise on the major physiological systems (cellular, cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, pulmonary, renal, body fluids, hormonal).
  • BBSR 4151 - Laboratory methods in biomechanics
    Permission required. Enrollment limited. Prerequisite: BBSR 4050. Students develop technical skills in the application of biomechanics to the study of movement behavior including video-based data collection and computer-based kinematic analysis. Students design and conduct a pilot research study using biomechanical analysis of a functional movement. Special fee: $100.
  • BBSR 4161 - Motor learning laboratory
    An introduction to qualitative and quantitative analysis of movement and action during acquisition of functional skills. Course fee $100. Corequisite: BBSR 4060.
  • BBSR 4195 - Applied Physiology Lab I
    The discussion and practice of techniques for collection and analysis of physiologic data (e.g., cardiorespiratory, body composition, muscular fitness) use in the practice of exercise physiology.
  • BBSR 4700 - Student teaching in physical education
    Student teaching in both elementary and secondary schools for a full semester. Includes a required seminar.
  • BBSR 4861 - Workshop in motor learning and control
    Students carry out a case study of skill acquisition in a functional movement task and integrate qualitative and quantitative findings in a final essay, characterizing the learning process.
  • BBSR 4900 - Research and independent study in movement science and education
    Permission required. Master's degree students undertake research and independent study under the direction of a faculty member.
  • BBSR 5028 - Motor development across the lifespan
    Review and analysis of theoretical models and experimental research related to development and performance of motor skills throughout the lifespan.
  • BBSR 5040 - Curriculum Designs in Physical Education
    Review of existing curriculum designs, traditional and new. Systematic development of curriculum plans.
  • BBSR 5041 - Analysis of teaching in physical education
    An analysis of the decisions and actions of teachers in relation to their role as director of learning. Includes experiences in executing and analyzing teaching skills.
  • BBSR 5043 - Administration of physical education and athletics
    For prospective and in-service administrators. Preparation for carrying out administrative functions related to program planning, scheduling, budgeting, equipment and facilities, safety and liability, staff development, community relations, and others.
  • BBSR 5050 - Neurophysiology of motor control and electromyography
    Review and analysis of theoretical models and experimental research related to development and performance of motor skills throughout the lifespan. Advanced topics dealing with the experimental and clinical use of electromyography. Topics will be integrated with the kinematics of movements being observed. A laboratory project using EMG will be required. Lab fee: $50.
  • BBSR 5055 - Bases of motor control systems
    Study of control processes subserving the coordination of movement.
  • BBSR 5057 - Movement Disorders and Neuroplasticity
    This class focuses on developing an in-depth understanding of the neurophysiological underpinnings of various movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease, brain injury, stroke and cerebral palsy. The factors that drive neuroplasticity and recovery of function in movement disorders, with a particular emphasis on physical rehabilitation implications in adult and pediatric populations, will also be covered. The course will primarily use a combined lecture/journal club format, whereby we will read and discuss both classic and current journal papers and review articles. These will include human behavioral, biomechanical, imaging, and clinical studies.
  • BBSR 5094 - Applied Physiology II
    This course compromises a thorough discussion of the physiological bases of exercise and the effects of exercise on the major physiological systems. An important recurring theme will be the "physiological extremes" illustrated by the severely-diseased vs. athletically-elite states. Pre-req BBSR 4095
  • BBSR 5095 - Exercise and health
    The role of exercise in diagnosis, prevention, and rehabilitation of health problems such as cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, diabetes, obesity, and stress. Scientific evidence from both epidemiological and applied practice perspectives are emphasized.
  • BBSR 5096 - Advanced Exercise and Physical Activity Prescription for Health
    This blended online and in-person course will review the scientific literature on exercise prescription for physical activity and exercise in people with chronic diseases, conditions such as pregnancy, and in special populations such as older adults and people with disabilities. Through readings and discussion of recent scientific and clinical literature, students will become familiar with the current recommendations for exercise prescription and the application of these recommendations to individuals with complex conditions. The translation of the science to practice will be a focus of this course.
  • BBSR 5101 - Scientific Basis of Exercise for Weight Management
    Obesity is a problem of energy balance: caloric intake versus expenditure. In this introductory course, students will learn the fundamentals of the role of exercise and physical activity in weight management. This course will discuss the practice and science of using exercise and physical activity for the purpose of managing and maintaining body weight, particularly as part of an integrated multi-disciplinary program. Sometimes, gaining weight is needed (or desired); therefore, there will be some emphasis on gaining lean mass. It is also important to note that exercise is extremely beneficial for health, even when no weight is lost.
  • BBSR 5102 - Electrocardiography & Clinical Exercise Test Interpretation
    This is an online course designed to teach students the fundamentals of reading an electrocardiogram (ECG) and the interpretation of clinical exercise tests. The course content will include 1) the basics of the underlying physiology of the normal and abnormal ECG; 2) how to read the resting and exercise ECG and to recognize common abnormalities; 3) basic pharmacology of commonly prescribed drugs that may affect the ECG and exercise test responses; and 4) interpretation and application of clinical data as part of the interpretation of the clinical exercise test. The course covers some of the requisite content on the American College of Sports Medicine Clinical Exercise Physiologist certification examination.
  • BBSR 5120 - Critical Issues in Physical Culture & Education
    This course broadly looks at socio-historical and educational issues of social justice in sports, exercise, fitness, and physical education. It offers a sociological, pedagogical, and critical inquiry into the study of human movement.
  • BBSR 5151 - Introduction to the analysis of biomechanical signals
    Introduction to MATLAB programming with a focus on variables, conditional statements, loops, data visualization, basic algorithm development, and Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs). Concepts and techniques used in the analysis of biomechanical/biological signals will be applied to kinematic/physiological data (e.g., electromyographic, kinetic, accelerometer, heart rate data, etc.) using MATLAB. Applications of MATLAB extend to the analysis of all types of quantitative data. Thus, students with data from other sources are welcome to use their own data for course assignments. Interactive lectures and weekly labs are intended for students across disciplines to develop the skills required to use MATLAB in their own research.
  • BBSR 5194 - Applied physiology laboratory II
    The discussion and practice of techniques for collection and analysis of physiologic data (e.g., cardiorespiratory, body composition, muscular fitness) use in the practice of exercise physiology.
  • BBSR 5195 - Advanced applied physiology laboratory
    Prerequisite: BBSR 5194. Introduction of advanced physiologic measurement techniques and concepts. Included are indirect calorimetry, spectrophotometry, vascular volume dynamics, autonomic reflexes, thermoregulation, noninvasive cardiac output, computer data plethysmography, tonometry, acquisition, and post-acquisition analyses. Lab fee: $100.
  • BBSR 5200 - Fieldwork in movement science and education
    Permission required. For advanced students prepared to investigate problems.
  • BBSR 5240 - Fieldwork in Curriculum and Teaching in Physical Education
    Field projects in program evaluation, curriculum development, analysis of teaching, and the application of teaching strategies.
  • BBSR 5251 - Fieldwork seminar in motor learning and motor control
    Applications of theory/research to therapeutic or educational practice for students in field-based settings.
  • BBSR 5504 - Research training in motor learning
    Permission required. A competency-based approach to the preparation of researchers in the areas of neuromotor control and perceptual-motor processes. Several learning experiences are offered each semester, involving lectures, laboratory practica, seminars and individual research advisement. Students are expected to be conducting research outside of class in partial fulfillment of their degree requirements for at least 2.5 days (20 hours) per week. Students must meet individually with their advisor(s) within the first three weeks of the semester to discuss written goals to be achieved during the semester.
  • BBSR 5505 - No Title Found in Banner
    This course will provide a comprehensive overview of theories of motor control, including a historical review of early theories to more contemporary models. The course will emphasize behavioral analysis of movement with implications for how to optimize motor skill attainment in various populations. We will cover the physiological and psychological foundations of motor control, as well as an overview of various activity systems including walking, posture, reaching and speech.
  • BBSR 5543 - Seminar in Physical Education
    Examination of current issues in curriculum and teaching in physical education relative to diverse student populations and associations with other disciplines.
  • BBSR 5582 - Research design in movement science and education
    Basic concepts of research design and statistical analysis. Students learn to interpret articles and design projects.
  • BBSR 5595 - Research seminar in applied physiology
    M.A. students carrying out research-culminating projects enroll in this course near the end of their course of study to discuss and present their projects. Ed.M. and doctoral students enroll at least once in connection with each research project they complete.
  • BBSR 5596 - Applied Physiology 2
    This course comprises a thorough discussion of the physiological bases of exercise and the effects of exercise on the major physiological systems. An important recurring theme will be the “physiological extremes” illustrated by the severely-diseased vs. athletically-elite states.
  • BBSR 6201 - Supervision of educational or clinical practice in the movement sciences
    Permission required. Corequisite: Actual supervisory experience during that semester. For doctoral students in the movement sciences. Field-based experiences in the guidance of therapists or educators engaged in applying the movement sciences to clinical practice.
  • BBSR 6540 - Research seminar in curriculum and teaching in physical education
    Examines research problems and methodologies in curriculum and teaching in physical education.
  • BBSR 6563 - Seminar in neuromotor processes
    The goals of this course are to develop a comprehensive understanding of contemporary motor learning issues. The course will use the "journal club" format, whereby we will read and discuss journal papers and review articles. Each week the instructor will provide a brief introduction to place the articles in the context of broader issues in the area of motor learning and control. In addition to the topic, emphasis will be placed on developing skills necessary to critically evaluate experimental studies and relating the material to clinical practice.
  • BBSR 6564 - Advanced topics in neuromotor processes
    Topic changes annually.
  • BBSR 6571 - Research seminar in the psychosocial aspects of human movement
    Faculty. Examines research topics, problems, design, and methodologies in the psychosocial study of human movement.
  • BBSR 6900 - No Title Found in Banner
    Advanced masters and doctoral students in Applied Physiology or Kinesiology (Applied Physiology Concentration) will register for this class while working on their Master's level integrative project or dissertation research. Requires a minimum of 27 hours per week of out-of-classroom work. Instructor's approval required.
  • BBSR 7500 - Dissertation seminar in movement science and education
    Permission required. Candidate develops proposal for doctoral dissertation in consultation with advisor. Seminar convenes only on days when candidates present proposals for approval.
  • BBSR 8900 - Dissertation advisement in movement science and education
    Individual advisement on doctoral dissertations. Fee to equal 3 points at current tuition rate for each term. For requirements, see section in catalog on Continuous Registration for Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.
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