Movement Science and Education | Teachers College Columbia University

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Movement Science and Education

Department of - Biobehavioral Sciences

Contact Information

(212) 678-3325
(212) 678-3322
msnsprogram@tc.edu
Professors Lori Quinn, Carol Ewing Garber, Laura Azzarito

Program Description

The Program of Movement Sciences and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University excels in graduate education and research in the sub-disciplines of Kinesiology, including Applied (Exercise) PhysiologyMotor Learning and Control, and Physical Education. The program has a long tradition of excellence. 

The Applied (Exercise) Physiology concentration focuses on the physiological effects of exercise and disease and on the promotion of physical activity. The effects of exercise training on physiological processes, behavioral health, and physical and mental well being are emphasized. Through a joint program with nutrition education, students can study Nutrition and Exercise Physiology through the Department of Health and Behavior Studies (Program in Nutrition). Students in Applied Physiology can supplement their work in applied exercise physiology with nutrition classes. Students can apply their academic work to improve health and physical fitness across both healthy and disabled populations. Doctoral students conduct related research in laboratory and health care facilities, and in field settings designed to promote physical activity and health.  

Students in the Applied (Exercise) Physiology specialization have access to a variety of rich resources at Columbia University. Active collaborations exist between our faculty and faculty in the Columbia University School of Medicine, Mailman School of Public Health, and the New York Center for Obesity Research. Students are welcome to participate in these ongoing projects and attend any of the frequent seminars at the Columbia University Medical Center and the New York Center for Obesity Research. 

Motor Learning and Control study focuses on the behavioral, biomechanical, and neural bases of development, acquisition, and performance of functional movement skills. Acquisition of skill is examined over the lifespan in typically developing and impaired individuals. Movement analysis is used to elucidate the neuromotor control processes underlying skilled performance in everyday functional behaviors, sport, and dance. The teacher or therapist’s role in facilitating skill learning and performance is emphasized.

Health and physical education has a long and distinguished history at Teachers College. Teachers College offered one of the first graduate degrees in health and physical education and continues to offer a wide array of opportunities for graduate study. In addition to courses in curriculum and teaching in physical education, there are a variety of other courses in the movement science, health studies, curriculum and teaching, physical culture, and other areas that provide students with many opportunities for course options. All programs are designed to allow flexibility in program planning.

Each of these specialties has five components:

  1. Substantive study of theory and research as embodied in lecture and laboratory courses.
  2. Development of clinical or educational skills in laboratory and fieldwork courses.
  3. Research training to enable students to read and interpret original research and to carry out educational, clinical, or laboratory research.
  4. Seminars to discuss theory and research, identification of research problems, and clinical/educational applications.
  5. Elective courses to meet specific student needs which may be taken throughout the College and University in such areas as Anatomy, Biology, Business, Chemistry, Computer Science, Health Education, Higher and Adult Education, Neurosciences, Nutrition, Physiology, Psychology, Public Health, and Science Education. A list of recommended elective and related courses is available to students in the Movement Science office. At least two courses (for a total of at least 6 points) outside of the program area are required.

Degree Summary

Master of Arts: Motor Learning

The Master of Arts (M.A.) program in Motor Learning & Control (Major Code: MTLG) is designed to provide students with a broad background in movement sciences and related areas. This program is designed for students seeking broad study of motor learning and control.  Students with any undergraduate major will be considered, The program provides content relevant to students from a range of applied areas, including dance, Pilates, yoga, movement practitioners (e.g. Feldenkrais Method, Alexander technique), physical and occupational therapists, coaches, and trainers.  Students can use this degree as a stepping stone for subsequent application to medical, physical therapy or occupational therapy schools, or doctoral study in kinesiology or rehabilitation sciences. 

Study focuses on the behavioral, biomechanical and neural bases of development, acquisition and performance of functional movement skills. Acquisition of skill is examined over the life span in typically developing children and adults and individuals with movement disorders. Movement analysis is used to elucidate the neuromotor control processes underlying skilled performance in everyday functional behaviors. The teacher or therapist’s role in facilitating skill learning and performance is emphasized.

The M.A. program emphasizes bridging between the movement sciences and clinical or educational practice. The objective is to develop a comprehensive and coherent view of theory and research that can be applied to practice within the student’s professional field.

The program requires 32 points of graduate study and includes:

  1. Substantive study of theory and research as embodied in lecture and laboratory courses.
  2. Development of clinical or educational skills in laboratory and fieldwork courses.
  3. Research training to enable students to read and interpret original research and to carry out educational, clinical or laboratory research.
  4. Seminars to discuss theory and research, identification of research problems, and clinical/educational applications.
  5. Elective courses to meet specific student needs which may be taken throughout Teachers College in such areas as anatomy, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, health education, higher and adult education, neurosciences, nutrition, physiology, psychology and science education.

A final project is required for the M.A. and may involve one of three options:

  1. A scholarly review of research and theory within a topical area drawing application to educational or clinical practice.
  2. An educational project including the development of an assessment instrument/method for clinical or educational practice or a presentation for a continuing education program.
  3. A basic or applied research study under the advisement of a faculty member or advanced doctoral student (note this option is required if considering doctoral study).

For the M.A. degree, students may also, in consultation with their faculty advisor, create a flexibly-designed program of study cutting across specialization areas (Motor learning & control, Applied exercise physiology, Physical education) which will meet their professional needs and academic interests. The M.A. program can be completed in 12-18 months of full-time study or two to three years of part-time study (depending on the student’s other responsibilities).

Special Admission Requirements/Academic Prerequisites

While students have come from a variety of fields, the following backgrounds are most appropriate: movement sciences, exercise science, physical therapy, occupational therapy, physical education, dance, athletic training, biology, nutrition, nursing, and psychology. Students with strong academic records, who have deficiencies in their science backgrounds, may be admitted with the understanding that these deficiencies will be remedied with appropriate courses.

Students are required to complete all of the following courses with a grade of B or better. Students who earn grades B- or below will need to retake those courses and will be charged tuition again. It is recommended that prospective students communicate with an academic advisor to discuss program plans prior to admission. Students are encouraged to make an appointment to visit the college for at least half a day to meet with faculty and current students, to audit a course or seminar, and to become acquainted with research areas and resources. Applicants are reviewed on an ongoing basis throughout the academic year. Prior to formal admission, enrollment in up to 8 points of study as a non-matriculated student is permitted.

Course Work Requirements  

Core Coursework (23 Credits)

BBS 5060 Neuromuscular response and adaptation to exercise (2 points)

BBS 5068 Brain and Behavior I: Communication in the nervous system (2 points)

BBSR 5055 Bases of motor control systems (3)

BBSR 5582 Research design in the movement sciences (3 points).

BBSR 4060 Motor learning (3) *

BBSR 4161 Motor learning laboratory (2 with co-requisite BBSR 4060) *

BBSR 5028 Motor development across the lifespan (3 points)

BBSR 4050 Biomechanical analysis of human movement (3 points)

BBSR 5504 Research Training Seminar (Section 02) (2 points)

(*) BBSR 4161 is a co-requisite of BBSR 4060 if taken for 2 points

Substantive Study (minimum 3 credits)

BBSR 4005 Applied anatomy and biomechanics (3)

BBSR 4055 Neuromotor processes (3)

BBSR 4090 Physical fitness, weight control and relaxation (3)

BBSR 4095 Applied physiology I (3)

BBSR 5050 Neurophysiology of motor control and electromyography (3)

BBSR 5057 Movement disorders (3)

BBSR 5095 Exercise and health (3)

BBSR 4070 Psychosocial Aspects of Sports and Exercise (3)

BBSR 6563 Seminar (3)

Laboratory Courses (minimum 3 credits)

BBSR 4151 Laboratory methods in biomechanics (3)

BBSR 4195 Applied physiology laboratory I (3)

BBSR 5151 Introduction to the analysis of biomechanical signals (3)

BBSR 5194 Applied physiology laboratory II (3)

BBSR 5195 Advanced applied physiology laboratory (3)

Elective Courses (3 credits)

Students should take 2-3 credits outside the Movement Sciences area (along with required courses BBS 5060 and BBS 5068) to meet the Teachers College breath requirement.  Please see the academic schedule and academic catalog for a full list of available courses. Popular breadth elective courses for students in Movement Sciences have included courses in Health and Behavioral Studies (HBSE), Human Development (HUDM), Neuroscience and Education (BBSN), Dance (A&HG), and Measurement and Statistics (HUDM). Please note that courses taken at Columbia Schools outside of Teachers College cannot count toward the breadth elective requirement. It is recommended that you discuss your electives with your advisor or program faculty for assistance in selecting courses that may contribute toward your educational and career goals. Courses outside of Movement Sciences (BBSR) that you use to fulfill core degree requirements and/or research methods requirements can also count toward the breadth requirement.

Additional Information 

BBSR   5504 (sect 002) Research training in motor learning (2). Students will enroll in this competency-based course during their last year of study to immerse themselves in current research in motor learning and control, as well as receive advisement on their final project. Note that if all coursework is complete but the student has not completed the final project, students must continue to enroll for 1 point (above and beyond the 32 points) each semester until the project is complete.

Individualized program.  Students with diverse interests may exchange courses for other department offerings in consult with an advisor.

Master of Education:  Motor Learning & Control

The Master of Education (Ed.M.) program in Movement Science and Education with a specialization in Motor Learning and Control (Major Code: MTLG) is designed to provide students with a broad background in movement sciences and related areas. Study focuses on the behavioral, biomechanical and neural bases of development, acquisition and performance of functional movement skills. Acquisition of skill is examined over the life span in typically developing children and adults and individuals with movement disorders. Movement analysis is used to elucidate the neuromotor control processes underlying skilled performance in everyday functional behaviors. The teacher or therapist’s role in facilitating skill learning and performance is emphasized.

The Ed.M program provides for advanced study in the movement sciences and for individually designed study to meet the student’s professional needs and interests. Students can focus on: (a) preparation as a “scholar of practice” able to translate research and theory into appropriate clinical or educational strategies; (b) preparation as a clinical instructor, clinical or educational supervisor or applied investigator; or (c) preparation for study towards the doctoral degree.

The program requires 60 points of graduate study and includes:

  1. Substantive study of theory and research as embodied in lecture and laboratory courses.
  2. Development of clinical or educational skills in laboratory and fieldwork courses.
  3. Research training to enable students to read and interpret original research and to carry out educational, clinical or laboratory research.
  4. Seminars to discuss theory and research, identification of research problems, and clinical/educational applications.
  5. Elective courses to meet specific student needs which may be taken throughout the College and University in such areas as anatomy, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, health education, higher and adult education, neurosciences, nutrition, physiology, psychology and science education.

A final project is required for the Ed.M. and may involve one of two options:

  1. An applied research study which can focus on clinical or educational issues.
  2. A laboratory research study.

For the Ed.M. degree, students may also arrange with their faculty advisor a flexibly-designed program of study cutting across specialization areas (Motor learning & control, Applied exercise physiology, Physical education) which will meet their professional needs and academic interests. Students intending to continue study towards the doctoral degree should arrange their Ed.M. program to include core courses required for doctoral specialization. The Ed.M. program can be completed in 12-18 months of full-time study or two to three years of part-time study (depending on the student’s other responsibilities).

Course Work Requirements

For the Ed.M. program, specific requirements for courses, or equivalents transferred from prior graduate study, are:

Core Coursework (23 Credits)

BBS 5060 Neuromuscular response and adaptation to exercise (2 points)

BBS 5068 Brain and Behavior I: Communication in the nervous system (2 points)

BBSR 5055 Bases of motor control systems (3)

BBSR 5582 Research design in the movement sciences (3 points).

BBSR 4060 Motor learning (3) *

BBSR 4161 Motor learning laboratory (2 with co-requisite BBSR 4060) *

BBSR 5028 Motor development across the lifespan (3 points)

BBSR 4050 Biomechanical analysis of human movement (3 points)

BBSR 5504 Research Training Seminar (Section 02) (2 points)

(*) BBSR 4161 is a co-requisite of BBSR 4060 if taken for 2 points

Substantive Study (minimum 9 credits)

BBSR 4005  Applied anatomy and biomechanics (3)

BBSR 4055  Neuromotor processes (3)

BBSR 4090  Physical fitness, weight control and relaxation (3)

BBSR 4095  Applied physiology I (3)

BBSR 5050  Neurophysiology of motor control and electromyography (3)

BBSR 5057  Movement disorders (3)

BBSR 5095  Exercise and health (3)

BBSR 4070  Psychosocial Aspects of Sports and Exercise (3)

Laboratory Courses (minimum 6 credits)

BBSR 4151  Laboratory methods in biomechanics (3)

BBSR 4195  Applied physiology laboratory I (3)

BBSR 5151  Introduction to the analysis of biomechanical signals (3)

BBSR 5194  Applied physiology laboratory II (3)

BBSR 5195  Advanced applied physiology laboratory (3)

Seminars, tutorials or conferences: minimally 6 credits in movement sciences (BBSR courses).

Elective Courses (2-3 credits)

Students should take 2-3 credits outside the Movement Sciences area (along with required courses BBS 5060 and BBS 5068) to meet the Teachers College breath requirement.  Please see the academic schedule and academic catalog for a full list of available courses. Popular breadth elective courses for students in Movement Sciences have included courses in Health and Behavioral Studies (HBSE), Human Development (HUDM), Neuroscience and Education (BBSN), Dance (A&HG), and Measurement and Statistics (HUDM). Please note that courses taken at Columbia Schools outside of Teachers College cannot count toward the breadth elective requirement. It is recommended that you discuss your electives with your advisor or program faculty for assistance in selecting courses that may contribute toward your educational and career goals. Courses outside of Movement Sciences (BBSR) that you use to fulfill core degree requirements and/or research methods requirements can also count toward the breadth requirement.

BBSR 5504 Research training in motor learning (Minimum 2 points). Students will enroll in this competency based course during their last year of study to immerse themselves in current research in motor learning and control, as well as receive advisement on their final project. Note that if all coursework is complete but the student has not completed the final project, students must continue to enroll for 1 point (above and beyond the 60 points) each semester until the project is complete.

Individual program: Minimally 12 points in movement sciences (additional BBSR courses in substantive, laboratory, fieldwork or seminar study) and/or related areas outside of the program in Movement Sciences and Education (non-BBSR courses, including graduate courses at Columbia University).

Special Admission Requirements/Academic Prerequisites

While students have come from a variety of fields, the following backgrounds are most appropriate: movement sciences, kinesiology, physical therapy, occupational therapy, physical education, dance, athletic training, biology, nutrition, nursing, and psychology. Students with strong academic records, who have deficiencies in their science backgrounds, may be admitted with the understanding that these deficiencies will be remedied with appropriate courses.

It is recommended that prospective students communicate with an academic advisor to discuss program plans prior to admission. Students are encouraged to make an appointment to visit the college for at least half a day to meet with faculty and current students, to audit a course or seminar, and to become acquainted with research areas and resources. Applicants are reviewed on an ongoing basis throughout the academic year. Prior to formal admission, enrollment in up to 8 points of study as a non-matriculated student is permitted.

Doctor of Education: Motor Learning & Control

Motor Learning & Control focuses on the behavioral, biomechanical, and neural bases of development, acquisition, and performance of functional movement skills. Acquisition of skill is examined over the life span in typically developing children and adults and individuals with movement disorders. Movement analysis is used to elucidate the neuromotor control processes underlying skilled performance in everyday functional behaviors. The teacher or therapist’s role in facilitating skill learning and performance is emphasized.

This specialty has five components:

  • Substantive study of theory and research as embodied in lecture and laboratory courses.
  • Development of clinical or educational skills in laboratory and fieldwork courses.
  • Research training to enable students to read and interpret original research and to carry out educational, clinical, or laboratory research.
  • Seminars to discuss theory and research, identification of research problems, and clinical/educational applications.
  • Elective courses to meet specific student needs which may be taken throughout the College and University in such areas as Anatomy, Biology, Business, Chemistry, Computer Science, Health Education, Higher and Adult Education, Neurosciences, Nutrition, Physiology, Psychology, and Science Education. A list of recommended elective and related courses is available to students in the Movement Science office.

In the preparation of doctoral students, the goal is to develop those competencies necessary to pursue scholarly and scientific work and to formulate strategies to enhance professional practice. The focus of the Ed.D. program is to prepare leaders of applied research for clinical and educational practice. Graduates often assume positions in clinical academic departments or teaching universities.

Research training uses an apprenticeship model. Students work closely with faculty throughout their preparation: initially as apprentices with access to considerable Advisement, subsequently as collaborators, then progressing to a position as independent researchers.

Typically, the dissertation research is an extension of one or two prior studies. Often, research leading up to the dissertation is presented at national meetings or is published in professional journals.

In addition to substantive study and research preparation, students are expected to design an individual program representing their research area and professional concerns. Such preparation requires a significant commitment to graduate study. Doctoral students are required to be engaged in research at least three weekdays per week (on- or off-site) and be available for advisement at least two mornings or afternoons.

For the doctoral program with specialization in Motor Learning, specific course requirements (or equivalents transferred from prior graduate study) are:

Substantive Study (23 Credits)

BBS 5060 Neuromuscular response and adaptation to exercise (2 points)

BBS 5068 Brain and Behavior I: Communication in the nervous system (2 points)

BBSR 5055  Bases of motor control systems (3)

BBSR 5582  Research design in the movement sciences (3 points).

BBSR 4060  Motor learning (3) *

BBSR 4161  Motor learning laboratory (2 with co-requisite BBSR 4060) *

BBSR 4151 Laboratory methods in biomechanics (3)

BBSR 5028 Motor development across the lifespan (3 points)

BBSR 4050 Biomechanical analysis of human movement (3 points)

BBSR 5151 Introduction to the analysis of biomechanical signals (3)

BBSR 5504 Research Training Seminar (Section 02) (2-3 points each semester, continuous enrollment required until completion of degree requirements, typically 18 points)

Four courses (12 points) selected from:

BBSR 4055 Neuromotor processes (3)

BBSR 4070 Introduction to Psychosocial Aspects of Sport/Exercise

BBSR 5050 Neurophysiology of motor control and electromyography (3)

BBSR 5057 Movement disorders (3)

BBSR 5251 Fieldwork seminar in motor learning and motor control (1-2)

 

Three topical seminars (9)

BBSR 5596 Topics in applied physiology (3)

BBSR 6563 Seminar in neuromotor processes (3)

BBSR 6564 Advanced topics in neuromotor processes (3)

BBSR 6565 Seminar in motor learning and motor control (3)

BBSR 6571 Research seminar in the psychosocial aspects of human movement (3)

 

Statistics sequence minimum (9)

HUDM 4122 Probability and statistical inference

HUDM 5122 Applied regression analysis

HUDM 5123 Linear models and experimental design

Two courses in educationally-relevant areas must also be selected from the list below or substituted with advisor permission (6)

C&T 4004 Basic course in school improvement (3)

C&T 4052 Designing curriculum and instruction (3)

C&T 4078 Curriculum and teaching in urban areas (3)

C&T 4114 Multicultural approaches to teaching young children (3)

C&T 4159 Teacher education programs (3)

C&T 5020 The environments of school (3)

Individual program and electives (17)

Service Requirements:

  • Teaching Assistantships Program faculty believe strongly in the value of assistant teaching (TA’ing). TA’ing can provide students with valuable opportunities to learn new material, review material previously acquired and obtain teaching skills and materials. The objective of the required teaching assistantship is to provide Ed.D. students with a quality learning experience that will benefit them regardless of whether they pursue academic or nonacademic careers. Doctoral students are required to serve as a teaching assistant for one Masters level course before graduating (whether in a paid or non-paid capacity). Every effort will be made to match student preferences with available opportunities, but students should expect that they may not always receive their first preference. Beyond this, additional teaching assistantship opportunities may be available for more advanced courses.
  • Graduate Study/Clinical Practice Traineeships are available for occupational and physical therapists enrolled in or admitted to degree programs in Movement Science. They are offered in collaboration with several clinical agencies located in the metropolitan New York area that provide services to diverse groups including pediatric, adult, and geriatric clients. These traineeships involve up to 20 hours per week in a clinical setting and provide stipend and tuition benefits. International students may qualify, contingent on obtaining appropriate New York State clinical licensure. The latter may take up to 12 months so interested prospective students should contact the coordinator as soon as possible during the application process. The instructional staff in Movement Science provides clinical supervision. A case study approach is used to directly bridge between substantive study and clinical practice. For more detailed information, contact the Coordinator of Clinical Traineeships at (212) 678-3325.
  • Part-time paid research or laboratory assistantships may be available for students in their middle to advanced stage of study.

Doctor of Philosophy:  Kinesiology

We offer a full-time PhD in Kinesiology with students specializing either in motor learning and control, applied physiology or physical education. The Ph.D. program requires a full-time commitment to graduate studies and students should not expect to hold outside employment during their studies. This commitment will ensure that advisement, research activities, and course work can be completed to the degree of competence that is expected in a research-intensive degree program. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy emphasizes research and intensive specialization in a field of scholarship.

The minimum requirements for the Ph.D. degree in Kinesiology are: satisfactory completion of a planned program of 75 graduate points beyond the Baccalaureate; submission of a statement of total program indicating periods of intensive study subsequent to the first year of graduate study which accompanies the program plan of study; satisfactory performance on a departmental Certification Examination; and preparation and defense of a research dissertation. In addition, doctoral students in Kinesiology are expected to complete a sequence of three research studies, or the equivalent, to meet degree requirements. Relevant courses completed in other recognized graduate schools to a maximum of 30 points, or 45 points if completed in another Faculty of Columbia University, may be accepted toward the minimum point requirement for the degree. Each degree candidate must satisfy departmental requirements for the award of the M.Phil. degree prior to continuance in the Ph.D. program. These degree requirements are specified in the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy Bulletin, obtainable from the Office of Doctoral Studies. Each student and his or her advisor develop a program that will help the student meet his or her goals and successfully complete the series of studies that meets the research requirements of the program.

For more information about special application requirements, program description and degree program requirements for the Ph.D. program in Kinesiology, contact Professor Gordon at msnsprogram@tc.edu.

 

 

For a complete listing of degree requirements, please click the "Degrees" tab above

For a complete listing of degree requirements, please continue on to this program's "Degrees" section in this document

Degree Requirements

About the Master's Degree Programs

For the M.A. and Ed.M. programs with specialization in Movement Science and Education, students have two options. They may specialize in one of the three areas offered within Movement Science (Applied Physiology, Motor Learning and Control, Physical Education) or in consultation with an advisor, they may arrange a flexibly-designed program of study cutting across specialization in the movement sciences that will meet their professional needs and academic interests.


Master of Arts

The Master of Arts (M.A.) program in Motor Learning & Control (Major Code: MTLG) is designed to provide students with a broad background in movement sciences and related areas. This program is designed for students seeking broad study of motor learning and control.  Students with any undergraduate major will be considered, The program provides content relevant to students from a range of applied areas, including dance, Pilates, yoga, movement practitioners (e.g. Feldenkrais Method, Alexander technique), physical and occupational therapists, coaches, and trainers.  Students can use this degree as a stepping stone for subsequent application to medical, physical therapy or occupational therapy schools, or doctoral study in kinesiology or rehabilitation sciences.

Study focuses on the behavioral, biomechanical and neural bases of development, acquisition and performance of functional movement skills. Acquisition of skill is examined over the life span in typically developing children and adults and individuals with movement disorders. Movement analysis is used to elucidate the neuromotor control processes underlying skilled performance in everyday functional behaviors. The teacher or therapist’s role in facilitating skill learning and performance is emphasized.

The M.A. program emphasizes bridging between the movement sciences and clinical or educational practice. The objective is to develop a comprehensive and coherent view of theory and research that can be applied to practice within the student’s professional field.

The program requires 32 points of graduate study and includes:

  1. Substantive study of theory and research as embodied in lecture and laboratory courses.
  2. Development of clinical or educational skills in laboratory and fieldwork courses.
  3. Research training to enable students to read and interpret original research and to carry out educational, clinical or laboratory research.
  4. Seminars to discuss theory and research, identification of research problems, and clinical/educational applications.
  5. Elective courses to meet specific student needs which may be taken throughout Teachers College in such areas as anatomy, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, health education, higher and adult education, neurosciences, nutrition, physiology, psychology and science education.

A final project is required for the M.A. and may involve one of three options:

  1. A scholarly review of research and theory within a topical area drawing application to educational or clinical practice.
  2. An educational project including the development of an assessment instrument/method for clinical or educational practice or a presentation for a continuing education program.
  3. A basic or applied research study under the advisement of a faculty member or advanced doctoral student (note this option is required if considering doctoral study).

For the M.A. degree, students may also, in consultation with their faculty advisor, create a flexibly-designed program of study cutting across specialization areas (Motor learning & control, Applied exercise physiology, Physical education) which will meet their professional needs and academic interests. The M.A. program can be completed in 12-18 months of full-time study or two to three years of part-time study (depending on the student’s other responsibilities).

Special Admission Requirements/Academic Prerequisites

While students have come from a variety of fields, the following backgrounds are most appropriate: movement sciences, exercise science, physical therapy, occupational therapy, physical education, dance, athletic training, biology, nutrition, nursing, and psychology. Students with strong academic records, who have deficiencies in their science backgrounds, may be admitted with the understanding that these deficiencies will be remedied with appropriate courses.

Students are required to complete all of the following courses with a grade of B or better. Students who earn grades B- or below will need to retake those courses and will be charged tuition again. It is recommended that prospective students communicate with an academic advisor to discuss program plans prior to admission. Students are encouraged to make an appointment to visit the college for at least half a day to meet with faculty and current students, to audit a course or seminar, and to become acquainted with research areas and resources. Applicants are reviewed on an ongoing basis throughout the academic year. Prior to formal admission, enrollment in up to 8 points of study as a non-matriculated student is permitted.

Course Work Requirements

Core Coursework (23 Credits)

BBS     5060    Neuromuscular response and adaptation to exercise (2 points)

BBS     5068    Brain and Behavior I: Communication in the nervous system (2 points)

BBSR   5055    Bases of motor control systems (3)

BBSR   5582    Research design in the movement sciences (3 points).

BBSR   4060    Motor learning (3) *

BBSR 4161      Motor learning laboratory (2 with co-requisite BBSR 4060) *

BBSR 5028      Motor development across the lifespan (3 points)

BBSR 4050      Biomechanical analysis of human movement (3 points)

BBSR 5504      Research Training Seminar (Section 02) (2 points)

(*) BBSR 4161 is a co-requisite of BBSR 4060 if taken for 2 points

Substantive Study (minimum 3 credits)

BBSR   4005    Applied anatomy and biomechanics (3)

BBSR   4055    Neuromotor processes (3)

BBSR   4090    Physical fitness, weight control and relaxation (3)

BBSR   4095    Applied physiology I (3)

BBSR   5050    Neurophysiology of motor control and electromyography (3)

BBSR   5057    Movement disorders (3)

BBSR   5095    Exercise and health (3)

BBSR 4070      Psychosocial Aspects of Sports and Exercise (3)

BBSR 5199      Conference Seminar (3)

Laboratory Courses (minimum 3 credits)

BBSR   4151    Laboratory methods in biomechanics (3)

BBSR   4195    Applied physiology laboratory I (3)

BBSR   5151    Introduction to the analysis of biomechanical signals (3)

BBSR   5194    Applied physiology laboratory II (3)

BBSR   5195    Advanced applied physiology laboratory (3)

Elective Courses (3 credits)

Students should take 2-3 credits outside the Movement Sciences area (along with required courses BBS 5060 and BBS 5068) to meet the Teachers College breath requirement. Please see the academic schedule and academic catalog for a full list of available courses. Popular breadth elective courses for students in Movement Sciences have included courses in Health and Behavioral Studies (HBSE), Human Development (HUDM), Neuroscience and Education (BBSN), Dance (A&HD), and Measurement and Statistics (HUDM). Please note that courses taken at Columbia Schools outside of Teachers College cannot count toward the breadth elective requirement. It is recommended that you discuss your electives with your advisor or program faculty for assistance in selecting courses that may contribute toward your educational and career goals. Courses outside of Movement Sciences (BBSR) that you use to fulfill core degree requirements and/or research methods requirements can also count toward the breadth requirement.

Additional Information

BBSR   5504 (sect 002) Research training in motor learning (2). Students will enroll in this competency-based course during their last year of study to immerse themselves in current research in motor learning and control, as well as receive advisement on their final project. Note that if all coursework is complete but the student has not completed the final project, students must continue to enroll for 1 point (above and beyond the 32 points) each semester until the project is complete.

Individualized program. Students with diverse interests may exchange courses for other department offerings in consult with an advisor.

Additional Courses offered in Movement Sciences and Education:

General Department Courses

BBS     4032    Neuroscience of human speech and language (2)

BBS     4050    Applied biomedical instrumentation (3)

BBS     5069    Brain and behavior II: Perception, emotion, memory and cognition (1-2)

BBSQ   4043    The human nervous system (3)

 

Seminars, Tutorials and Conferences

BBSR   4865    Tutorials in motor learning (0-3)

BBSR   5596    Topics in applied physiology (3)

BBSR   6564    Advanced topics in neuromotor processes (3)

BBSR   6565    Seminar in motor learning and motor control (3)

Fieldwork

BBSR   5200    Fieldwork in movement sciences (1-4)

BBSR   5251    Fieldwork seminar in motor learning and motor control (1-2)

BBSR   6201    Supervision of educational or clinical practice in the movement sciences (0-2)

Research Preparation

BBSR 4900      Research and independent study in movement sciences and education (1 or more)

BBSR   5595    Research seminar in applied physiology (3)

BBSR 5582      Research design in the movement science and education(3)

BBSR   6900    Supervised independent research in movement sciences (1-9)


Masters of Arts: Applied Physiology

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The Applied Physiology concentration focuses on the study of physical activity behavior, physiological and psychological effects of acute and chronic exercise, how exercise influences physical and mental health, and on the promotion of physical activity in community, clinical, and public health settings. The effects of exercise training on psychological and physiological processes, neuromuscular and biomechanical function, health, and physical and mental wellbeing are emphasized. Students can apply their academic work to jobs that involve exercise testing and training, including programs designed to improve health and physical fitness in healthy individuals, in people with or at risk for chronic illness or disability, and in community, clinical, research, and public health settings. The program also may serve as a stepping-stone to medical, professional schools, and doctoral studies.

The Master of Arts (M.A.) program emphasizes bridging science and practice. The overarching objective of the program is to develop competence in practical skills and critical thinking skills that facilitate applying scientific knowledge to practice within the student’s professional field. The program can be individualized to span the movement sciences and includes at least two Teachers College courses (for a total of 6 points) in programs outside of the movement sciences (i.e., non “BBSR” courses), such as neuroscience, nutrition education, health education, and other programs.

The Masters of Arts program in Applied Physiology requires a minimum of 32 points of graduate study, and it typically takes twelve months of full-time, or two years of part-time study. Full time students who wish to graduate in May-- or who have no previous formal study in Kinesiology/Movement Science-related field-- are strongly advised to start the program in the Summer semester.

The Program has five components:

1. Substantive study of theory and research as embodied in lecture and laboratory courses.

2. Development of clinical practice skills in laboratory and fieldwork courses.

3. Research training to enable students to read and interpret original research.

4. Elective courses to meet specific needs, which may be taken throughout the Teachers College in an area of your choice.

5. A culminating examination or project integrating material from Applied Physiology coursework.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The Masters of Arts program in Applied Physiology requires a minimum of 32 points. These courses come from the required core courses, electives in movement sciences, and breadth elective courses taken outside of the program. In addition, students who enter the program without prior formal study in Kinesiology, Movement, or Exercise Sciences or a closely-related field may be required to take coursework in addition to these program requirements, and it is strongly recommended they start in the summer semester if at all possible. All students must complete a final comprehensive examination or integrative project. No transfer credit from other graduate schools is awarded for Master of Arts students. Students are expected to consult with the Registrar’s Office or website for additional information about degree requirements, policies and procedures (http://www.tc.columbia.edu/registrar/pages/degree-information/degreerequirements/).

The specific requirements for the M.A. program in Applied Physiology are described below:

Required Core Courses (minimum of 15 points)

Students are required to complete all of the following courses with a grade of B or better. Students who earn grades B- or below will need to retake those courses and will be charged tuition again.

• BBSR 4095 Applied physiology I (3)

• BBSR 5594 Applied Physiology 2 (3)

• BBSR 4195 Applied physiology laboratory I (3)

• BBSR 5194 Applied physiology laboratory II (3)

• BBSR 5582 Research Design in the Movement Sciences (3) OR

• BBSR 4001 Qualitative Research Methods in Biobehavioral Sciences

 

Electives in Movement Sciences and Education (BBSR) (minimum of 6 points).

Students are required to take at least two additional BBSR courses (for a minimum of 6 points) in addition to the core required courses. These electives may include, but are not limited to, the following BBSR courses:

• BBSR 4001 Qualitative Research Methods in Biobehavioral Sciences and Education (3)

• BBSR 4054 Anatomy and Physiology (3)

• BBSR 4005 Applied anatomy and biomechanics (3)

• BBSR 4050 Biomechanical Analysis of human movement (3)

• BBSR 4055 Neuromotor processes (3)

• BBSR 4060 Motor learning (2-3)

• BBSR 4070 Introduction to Psychosocial Aspects of Sports/Exercise (2-3)

• BBSR 4090 Physical Fitness, Weight Control and Relaxation (2-3)

• BBSR 4900 Research and Independent Study in Movement Science and Education (1-3)

• BBSR 5028 Motor Development (2-3)

• BBSR 5050 Neurophysiology of motor control and electromyography (3)

• BBSR 5055 Basis of Motor Control (3)

• BBSR 5057 Movement disorders (3)

• BBSR 5095 Exercise and health (3)

• BBSR 5096 Advanced Exercise and Physical Activity Prescription (3)

• BBSR 5101 Scientific Basis of Exercise and Weight Management (3)

• BBSR 5120 Critical issues in Physical Culture and Education (3 credits)

• BBSR 5151 Introduction to Programming for Signal Analysis of Biobehavioral Signals (2-3)

• BBSR 5200 Fieldwork in Movement Sciences and Education (1-3)

• BBSR 5195 Advanced Applied Physiology Laboratory (3)

• BBSR 5595 Research seminar in applied physiology (1-3)

 

Elective Courses for Those Planning for Exercise Professional Certifications

Any student considering taking a professional certification should discuss course selection with program faculty and also check the certification requirements posted by the certifying organization. Please note it is possible that you may need to take extra courses above the 32 point requirement to meet the requirements to sit for some professional certifications. Students in MA and Ed.M. programs in AP can meet the curricular requirements for the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Certified Exercise Physiologist (EP-C) and Certified Clinical Exercise Physiologist (CEP) certifications, as long as certain elective courses are taken in addition to the required core courses. The courses you elect will depend on the certification you select and your previous undergraduate study. For those interested in the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS), there are no specific course requirements to take the examination, however, there are elective courses that are recommended to help you prepare for the exam.

Further information about the CSCS certification can be found here: https://www.nsca.com/cscsexam-prerequisites/#bd

American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) certifications requirements can be found here: http://certification.acsm.org

 

Breadth Courses outside of Movement Sciences and Education (a total of 6 points).

Breadth elective courses must be taken in any program or department at Teachers College, except Movement Sciences (BBSR). Please see the academic schedule and academic catalog for a full list of available courses. Popular breadth elective courses for students in Applied Physiology have included courses in Biobehavioral Sciences (BBS) Health Education (HBSS), Nutrition (HBSV), Diabetes Education (HBSD), Neuroscience and Education (BBSN), and Statistics (HUDM). Please note that courses taken at Columbia Schools outside of Teachers College cannot count toward the breadth elective requirement, but they may count toward your degree if approved by your advisor, as long as other degree requirements are met. It is recommended that you discuss your electives with your advisor or program faculty for assistance in selecting courses that may contribute toward your educational and career goals.

Here is a partial list of popular breadth courses in the Department of Biobehavioral Sciences to consider:

• BBS 5060 Neuromuscular responses and adaptation to exercise (2)

• BBS 5068 Brain and Behavior I Communication in the nervous system (1-2)

• BBS 5069 Brain and Behavior II (1-2)

• BBSN 4003 Foundations of Neuroscience (3)

• BBSN 4000 Cognitive Neuroscience (3)

• BBSN 5122 Psychoneuroimmunology and Education

 

Research Seminar (minimum of 4 points required for those choosing the Final Integrative Project Option)

Registration and attendance at research seminar is required for all who choose the Integrative Final Project option. Students should expect to register in seminar during all semesters when working on Integrative project, with at least two semesters required (for a minimum of 4 points). This course can count toward your Movement Sciences elective.

• BBSR 5595 Research seminar in applied physiology (1-3)

 

Recommended Background Courses for Students Entering without Prior Study in Kinesiology, Movement or Exercise Sciences.

It is recommended that students who come in without prior formal study in Kinesiology, Movement or Exercise Sciences take one or more of the following courses in addition to the program requirements outlined above. Some of these courses can be taken in the summer so a summer semester start may be advisable. Students should consult with their program advisor about taking additional courses. The courses that may be recommended can include one or more of the following:

• BBSR 4054 Anatomy and Physiology (3)

• BBSR 4005 Applied anatomy and biomechanics (3)

• BBSR 4060 Motor learning (3)

• BBSR 4070 Introduction to Psychosocial Aspects of Sports/Exercise (2-3)

• BBSR 4090 Physical Fitness, Weight Control and Relaxation (2-3)

 

Comprehensive Examination or Integrative Final Project

A comprehensive examination or integrative final project is required for the M.A. degree in Applied Physiology. The comprehensive examination option is strongly recommended for most M.A. students. The decision to complete the integrative project should be made early in the program in consultation with your advisor or program faculty, as this takes at least two semesters to complete and requires registration in BBSR 5595 Research Seminar in Applied Physiology for at least two semesters (during the proposal development and writing phase on the project). The comprehensive examination is given during Fall, Spring, and Summer A semesters. The examination covers the content of the required core courses and can be completed as soon as these required core courses are completed. Arrangements to sit for the examination can be made with the Applied Physiology Program Director the semester before you plan to take the examination.


Master of Education

The Master of Education (Ed.M.) program in Motor Learning (Code: MTLG) is designed to provide students with a broad background in movement sciences and related areas. Study focuses on the behavioral, biomechanical and neural bases of development, acquisition and performance of functional movement skills. Acquisition of skill is examined over the life span in typically developing and impaired individuals. Movement analysis is used to elucidate the neuromotor control processes underlying skilled performance in everyday functional behaviors, sport and dance. The teacher or therapist’s role in facilitating skill learning and performance is emphasized.

The Ed.M program provides for advanced study in the movement sciences and for individually designed study to meet the student’s professional needs and interests. Students can focus on: (a) preparation as a “scholar of practice” able to translate research and theory into appropriate clinical or educational strategies; (b) preparation as a clinical instructor, clinical or educational supervisor or applied investigator; or (c) preparation for study towards the doctoral degree.

The program requires 60 points of graduate study and includes:

1. Substantive study of theory and research as embodied in lecture and laboratory courses.

2. Development of clinical or educational skills in laboratory and fieldwork courses.

3. Research training to enable students to read and interpret original research and to carry out educational, clinical or laboratory research.

4. Seminars to discuss theory and research, identification of research problems, and clinical/educational applications.

5. Elective courses to meet specific student needs which may be taken throughout the College and University in such areas as anatomy, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, health education, higher and adult education, neurosciences, nutrition, physiology, psychology and science education.

A final project is required for the Ed.M. and may involve one of two options:

1. An applied research report which can focus on clinical or educational issues.

2. A laboratory research paper.

For the Ed.M. degree, students may specialize in one of the three areas (Applied Physiology [Code: APHY], Motor Learning [Code: MTLG], Physical Education [Codes: PECT]) offered within Movement Sciences and Education or, in consultation with an advisor, they may arrange a flexibly-designed program of study cutting across specialization areas which will meet their professional needs and academic interests. Students intending to continue study towards the doctoral degree should arrange their Ed.M. program to include core courses required for doctoral specialization.

Course Work Requirements

For the Ed.M. program, specific requirements for courses, or equivalents transferred from prior graduate study, are:

Core Coursework (23 Credits)

BBS     5060    Neuromuscular response and adaptation to exercise (2 points)

BBS     5068    Brain and Behavior I: Communication in the nervous system (2 points)

BBSR   5055    Bases of motor control systems (3)

BBSR   5582    Research design in the movement sciences (3 points).

BBSR   4060    Motor learning (3) *

BBSR 4161      Motor learning laboratory (2 with co-requisite BBSR 4060) *

BBSR 5028      Motor development across the lifespan (3 points)

BBSR 4050      Biomechanical analysis of human movement (3 points)

BBSR 5504      Research Training Seminar (Section 02) (2 points)

(*) BBSR 4161 is a co-requisite of BBSR 4060 if taken for 2 points

Substantive Study (minimum 9 credits)

BBSR   4005    Applied anatomy and biomechanics (3)

BBSR   4055    Neuromotor processes (3)

BBSR   4090    Physical fitness, weight control and relaxation (3)

BBSR   4095    Applied physiology I (3)

BBSR   5050    Neurophysiology of motor control and electromyography (3)

BBSR   5057    Movement disorders (3)

BBSR   5095    Exercise and health (3)

BBSR 4070      Psychosocial Aspects of Sports and Exercise (3)

BBSR 5199      Conference Seminar (3)

Laboratory Courses (minimum 6 credits)

BBSR   4151    Laboratory methods in biomechanics (3)

BBSR   4195    Applied physiology laboratory I (3)

BBSR   5151    Introduction to the analysis of biomechanical signals (3)

BBSR   5194    Applied physiology laboratory II (3)

BBSR   5195    Advanced applied physiology laboratory (3)

Seminars, tutorials or conferences: minimally 6 credits in movement sciences (BBSR courses).

Elective Courses (2-3 credits)

Students should take 2-3 credits outside the Movement Sciences area (along with required courses BBS 5060 and BBS 5068) to meet the Teachers College breath requirement. Please see the academic schedule and academic catalog for a full list of available courses. Popular breadth elective courses for students in Movement Sciences have included courses in Health and Behavioral Studies (HBSE), Human Development (HUDM), Neuroscience and Education (BBSN), Dance (A&HD), and Measurement and Statistics (HUDM). Please note that courses taken at Columbia Schools outside of Teachers College cannot count toward the breadth elective requirement. It is recommended that you discuss your electives with your advisor or program faculty for assistance in selecting courses that may contribute toward your educational and career goals. Courses outside of Movement Sciences (BBSR) that you use to fulfill core degree requirements and/or research methods requirements can also count toward the breadth requirement.

BBSR   5504 Research training in motor learning (Minimum 2 points). Students will enroll in this competency based course during their last year of study to immerse themselves in current research in motor learning and control, as well as receive advisement on their final project. Note that if all coursework is complete but the student has not completed the final project, students must continue to enroll for 1 point (above and beyond the 60 points) each semester until the project is complete.

Individual program: Minimally 12 points in movement sciences (additional BBSR courses in substantive, laboratory, fieldwork or seminar study) and/or related areas outside of the program in Movement Sciences and Education (non-BBSR courses, including graduate courses at Columbia University).

Special Admission Requirements/Academic Prerequisites

While students have come from a variety of fields, the following backgrounds are most appropriate: movement sciences, kinesiology, physical therapy, occupational therapy, physical education, dance, athletic training, biology, nutrition, nursing, and psychology. Students with strong academic records, who have deficiencies in their science backgrounds, may be admitted with the understanding that these deficiencies will be remedied with appropriate courses.

It is recommended that prospective students communicate with an academic advisor to discuss program plans prior to admission. Students are encouraged to make an appointment to visit the college for at least half a day to meet with faculty and current students, to audit a course or seminar, and to become acquainted with research areas and resources. Applicants are reviewed on an ongoing basis throughout the academic year. Prior to formal admission, enrollment in up to 8 points of study as a non-matriculated student is permitted.

Additional Courses offered in Movement Sciences and Education:

General Department Courses

BBS     4032    Neuroscience of human speech and language (2)

BBS     4050    Applied biomedical instrumentation (3)

BBS     5069    Brain and behavior II: Perception, emotion, memory and cognition (1-2)

BBSQ   4043    The human nervous system (3)

Seminars, Tutorials and Conferences

BBSR   4865    Tutorials in motor learning (0-3)

BBSR   5596    Topics in applied physiology (3)

BBSR   6564    Advanced topics in neuromotor processes (3)

BBSR   6565    Seminar in motor learning and motor control (3)

Fieldwork

BBSR   5200    Fieldwork in movement sciences (1-4)

BBSR   5251    Fieldwork seminar in motor learning and motor control (1-2)

BBSR   6201    Supervision of educational or clinical practice in the movement sciences (0-2)

Research Preparation

BBSR 4900      Research and independent study in movement sciences and education (1 or more)

BBSR   5595    Research seminar in applied physiology (3)

BBSR 5582      Research design in the movement science and education (3)

BBSR   6900    Supervised independent research in movement sciences (1-9)

Doctor of Education: Motor learning


Master of Education: Applied Physiology

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The Applied Physiology concentration focuses on the study of physical activity behavior, physiological and psychological effects of acute and chronic exercise, how exercise influences physical and mental health, and on the promotion of physical activity in community, clinical and public health settings. The effects of exercise training on psychological and physiological processes, neuromuscular and biomechanical function, health, and physical and mental wellbeing are emphasized. Students can apply their academic work to jobs that involve exercise testing and training, including programs designed to improve health and physical fitness in healthy individuals and in people with or at risk for chronic illness or disability and in community, clinical, research, and public health settings. The program also may serve as a stepping-stone to medical, professional schools and doctoral studies.

The Master of Education program provides for advanced study in the movement sciences and for individually designed study to meet the student’s professional needs and interests. This program is particularly recommended for students planning on future doctoral study and research careers and those planning to teach at the community college level. The Master of Education (Ed.M.) program emphasizes bridging science and practice and training in the conduct of research. The overarching objective of the program is to develop competence in practical skills and critical thinking skills that facilitate applying scientific knowledge to practice within the student’s professional field. The program can be individualized to cross the Movement Sciences.

 

In the Ed.M. program, students can focus on:

• Preparation as a “scholar of practice,” able to translate research and theory into appropriate clinical or educational strategies;

• Preparation as a clinical instructor, clinical or educational supervisor, or research assistant/associate

• Preparation for study towards the doctoral degree (e.g., Ph.D., Ed.D., D.Ph., or M.D.)

 

The program requires a minimum of 60 points of graduate study and takes about two years of full-time study or three to four years of part-time study to complete.

The Program has five components:

1. Substantive study of theory and research as embodied in lecture and laboratory courses.

2. Development of clinical practice skills in laboratory and fieldwork courses.

3. Research training to enable students to read, interpret, and conduct original research.

4. Elective courses to meet specific needs, which may be taken throughout the Teachers College in an area of your choice.

5. A culminating project integrating material from your coursework.

 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The Master of Education program in Applied Physiology requires a minimum of 60 points. These courses come from the required core courses, electives in movement sciences, research methods and statistics, and breadth elective courses taken outside of the program. In addition, students who enter the program without prior formal study in Kinesiology or in Movement or Exercise Sciences or closely-related field may be required to take coursework in addition to these program requirements. All students must complete a final comprehensive integrative project. Students intending to continue study towards the doctoral degree or other professional program should arrange their Ed.M. program to include courses that may be required for doctoral or professional specialization. Some transfer credits from other graduate schools may be awarded for Master of Education students. Students are expected to consult the Registrar’s Office website for additional information about degree requirements, policies and procedures(http://www.tc.columbia.edu/registrar/pages/degree-information/degree-requirements/).

The specific requirements for the Ed.M. program in Applied Physiology are described below:

Required Core Courses (minimum of 15 points)

Students are required to complete all of the following courses with a grade of B or better. Students who earn grades B- or below will need to retake those courses and will be charged tuition again.

• BBSR 4095 Applied physiology I (3)

• BBSR 5094 Applied Physiology II (3)

• BBSR 4195 Applied physiology laboratory I (3)

• BBSR 5194 Applied physiology laboratory II (3)

• BBSR 5582 Research Design in the Movement Sciences (3) OR

• BBSR 4001 Qualitative Research Methods in Biobehavioral Sciences

Electives in Movement Sciences and Education (BBSR courses) (minimum of 12 points)

Students are required to take at least four additional BBSR courses (for a minimum of 12 points) in addition to the core required courses. These electives may include, but are not limited to, the following BBSR courses:

• BBSR 4054 Anatomy and Physiology (3)

• BBSR 4005 Applied anatomy and biomechanics (3)

• BBSR 4050 Biomechanical Analysis of human movement (3)

• BBSR 4060 Motor learning (3)

• BBSR 4070 Introduction to Psychosocial Aspects of Sports/Exercise (2-3)

• BBSR 4090 Physical Fitness, Weight Control and Relaxation (2-3)

• BBSR 4900 Research and Independent Study in Movement Science and Education (1-3)

• BBSR 5057 Movement Disorders (3)

• BBSR 5200 Fieldwork in Movement Sciences and Education (1-3)

• BBSR 5028 Motor Development (2-3)

• BBSR 5050 Neurophysiology of motor control and electromyography (3)

• BBSR 5055 Basis of Motor Control (3)

• BBSR 5057 Movement disorders (3)

• BBSR 5095 Exercise and health (3)

• BBSR 5096 Advanced Exercise and Physical Activity Prescription (3)

• BBSR 5101 Scientific Basis of Exercise and Weight Management (3)

• BBSR 5151 Introduction to Programming for Signal Analysis of Biobehavioral Signals (3)

• BBSR 5195 Advanced applied physiology laboratory (3)

• BBSR 5595 Research seminar in applied physiology (1-3)

 

Elective Courses for Those Planning for Exercise Professional Certifications

Any student considering taking a professional certification should discuss with AP faculty and also check the certification requirements posted by the certifying organization. Students in MA and Ed.M. programs in AP can meet the curricular requirements for the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Certified Exercise Physiologist (EP-C) and Certified Clinical Exercise Physiologist (CEP) certifications, as long as they take certain elective courses in addition to the required core courses. The courses you elect will depend on the certification you select and your previous undergraduate study. For the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS), there are no specific course requirements other than graduating or being enrolled in an accredited program (the AP program is accredited), however, there are elective courses that are recommended to help you prepare for the exam.

Further information about the CSCS certification can be found here: https://www.nsca.com/cscsexam-prerequisites/#bd

American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) certifications requirements can be found here: http://certification.acsm.org

 

Research Methods and Statistics (minimum of 9 points)

These courses may include, but are not limited to the following:

• BBSR 5582 Research Design in the Movement Sciences (3)

• HUDM4120 Basic concepts in statistics (if no undergraduate statistics) (3)

• HUD 4120 Methods of Empirical Research

• HUDM 4122 Probability and statistical inference (3)

• HUDM 4050 Introduction to Measurement

• HUDM 5122 Applied Regression Analysis (3)

• HUDM 5123 Linear Models and Experimental Design (3)

• BBSR 4001 Qualitative Research Methods in Biobehavioral Sciences and Education (3)

• MSTC 5001 Qualitative Research Methods in Science Education

• Other TC/CU graduate research methods/ statistics courses with approval of advisor

Research Seminar (minimum 4 points)

Registration and attendance at research seminar is required for all Ed.M. students.  Students should expect to register in seminar during all semesters when working on Integrative Final project, with at least two semesters required for a minimum of 4 points).

• BBSR 5595 Research seminar in applied physiology (1-3)

 

Breadth Courses outside of Movement Sciences and Education (a total 6 points).

Breadth Elective Courses must be taken in any program or department at Teachers College, except Movement Sciences (BBSR). Please see the academic schedule and academic catalog for a full list of available courses. Popular breadth elective courses for students in Applied Physiology have included courses Health Education (HBSS), Nutrition (HBSV), Diabetes Education (HBSD), and Neuroscience and Education (BBSN). Please note that courses taken at Columbia Schools outside of Teachers College cannot count toward the breadth elective requirement, but they may count toward your degree if approved by your advisor, as long as other degree requirements are met. It is recommended that you discuss your electives with your advisor or program faculty for assistance in selecting courses that may contribute toward your educational and career goals. Courses outside of Movement Sciences (BBSR) that you use to fulfill core degree requirements and/or research methods requirements can also count toward the breadth requirement.

Here is a partial list of popular breadth courses in the Department of Biobehavioral Sciences to consider:

• BBS 5060 Neuromuscular responses and adaptation to exercise (2)

• BBS 5068 Brain and Behavior I: Communication in the nervous system (1-2)

• BBS 5069 Brain and Behavior II (1-2)

• BBSN 4001-4002 Foundations of Neuroscience I and II (3)

• BBSN 4000 Cognitive Neuroscience (3)

• BBSN 5122 Psychoneuroimmunology and Education

 

Recommended Background Courses for Students Entering without Prior Study in Kinesiology, Movement, or Exercise Sciences.

It is recommended that students who come in without prior formal study in Kinesiology, Movement, or Exercise Sciences take one or more of the following courses in addition to the program requirements outlined above. Some of these courses can be taken in the summer so a Summer start in the program is strongly suggested. Students should consult with their program advisor about the advisability of taking these additional courses.

• BBSR 4054 Anatomy and Physiology (3)

• BBSR 4005 Applied anatomy and biomechanics (3)

• BBSR 4060 Motor learning (3)

• BBSR 4070 Introduction to Psychosocial Aspects of Sports/Exercise (3)

• BBSR 4090 Physical Fitness, Weight Control and Relaxation (2-3)

 

Integrative Final Project

A year-long comprehensive integrative final project is required for the Ed.M. degree in Applied Physiology. The planning to complete the integrative project should be made early in the program in consultation with your advisor or program faculty, as this takes at least two semesters to complete and requires registration in BBSR 5595 Research seminar in applied physiology for at least 2 semesters (during the proposal development and writing phase on the project).

The Integrative Final Project may consist of one of the following:

• A scholarly systematic review of research in applied physiology and movement sciences

• An educational project including the development of an assessment instrument/method for clinical or educational practice or a presentation for a continuing education, health promotion or physical activity program

• An applied research project under the mentorship of a doctoral student or program faculty member


About the Doctoral Programs

In the preparation of doctoral students, the goal is to develop those competencies necessary to pursue scholarly and scientific work and to formulate strategies to enhance professional practice. Formal admission to the doctoral program is based upon level of achievement in coursework and seminars; demonstration of research competence; a research direction compatible with faculty and laboratory resources; and signs of professional promise. A list of current research projects in Applied Physiology can be obtained from the program coordinator.

Applicants for the Ed.D. degree are reviewed on an ongoing basis throughout the academic year. However, consideration for general and diversity awards is given to those applicants who meet the early application deadline. See the Admissions section of this bulletin for details. Prior to formal admission, enrollment in up to 8 points of study as a non-matriculated student is permitted. Applicants for the Ph.D. in Kinesiology are reviewed once a year subsequent to the December 15th application deadline.

Specialization in Applied Physiology, Motor Learning and Control, or Physical Education is required for the doctoral program in these areas. Within each area of specialization, students prepare course and laboratory projects, research papers, and other materials appropriate for their projected professional activities. The program requires a minimum of 90 points of graduate study.

The doctoral program prepares individuals for leadership roles in the movement sciences and in the fields of physical education, nutrition, dance education, and rehabilitation (occupational, physical and respiratory therapy). Graduates have assumed positions as faculty members and program directors in universities and colleges; as researchers in educational, clinical, or biomedical settings; and as administrators, supervisors, or consultants in clinical or educational facilities. Preparation focuses advanced study and research training within the specialization.

Special Application Requirements, Applied Physiology Programs:

While students have come from a variety of fields, the following backgrounds are most appropriate: kinesiology, movement sciences, exercise science, physical therapy, occupational therapy, physical education, athletic training, biology, nutrition, nursing, and psychology. Students with strong academic records who have deficiencies in their science backgrounds may be admitted on a provisional basis with the understanding that these deficiencies will be remedied with appropriate courses taken in addition to those required for the M.A. degree. It is strongly recommended that students without undergraduate coursework in anatomy and physiology (usually a two-semester sequence with laboratory) take these courses prior to entering the program. It is recommended that prospective students communicate with an academic advisor to discuss program plans prior to admission. Students are encouraged to make an appointment to visit the College to meet with faculty. If desired, it is possible to audit a class or seminar session during your visit. Applicants are reviewed on an ongoing basis throughout the academic year. Prior to formal admission, enrollment in up to 8 points of study as a non-matriculated student is permitted. 


Doctor of Education: Applied Physiology

The goal of the Doctor of Education with specialization in Applied Physiology is to prepare doctoral students to pursue scholarly and scientific work. Students are expected to contribute significantly to the completion of at least one comprehensive research project prior to initiation of their dissertation proposal. The skills developed during completion of this project will enable students to carry out their dissertation projects independently. Students are encouraged to present the work leading up to the dissertation proposal at national meetings and to contribute to the publication of results in peer-reviewed journals. Research may be completed in the applied physiology laboratories at Teachers College or in another clinical/research setting. If the work is completed outside of Teachers College, students are expected to work closely with their advisor and demonstrate that they have contributed significantly to the completion of the required projects. All work (either at Teachers College or outside of the College) must be developed and completed in close conjunction with advisement of Applied Physiology Program faculty. The preliminary work may be published prior to graduation, but the final study may only be published upon completion of the degree. All Ed.D. students are encouraged to write a grant to obtain pre-doctoral fellowship funding to support their research and to provide some training in grantsmanship.

Admission

Applicants are expected to satisfy the following requirements for admission:

  1. Prior completion of both a bachelor’s and master’s degree program (with a major in movement sciences or closely related field at either or both levels). Students who have deficiencies but who are otherwise qualified are encouraged to apply to the Masters of Education Program to complete deficiencies.
  2. A record of superior academic achievement as evidenced by the grades received in undergraduate and graduate course work.
  3. Letters of recommendation from persons familiar with the candidate’s academic and professional achievements should attest to the applicant’s capability for successful doctoral study.
  4. The applicant’s written personal statement (accompanying the application) should provide evidence of the ability to communicate effectively in writing and should provide an initial indication that the program is compatible with his or her professional goals. A key part of the admissions process is a research interest compatible with a faculty member in the Movement Sciences.
  5. Each applicant should submit one additional writing sample, such as a term paper, thesis, or published article, so that academic writing skills can be assessed.  In cases where a thesis is in progress, a research proposal may be acceptable at the discretion of the faculty.
  6. In most cases, an interview will be required to clarify any unresolved issues related to the applicant’s qualifications and interests and to make certain that the area of study is compatible with the applicant’s professional goals and that the area of research interest can be supported by a faculty member in Movement Sciences.  In instances where applicants are a long distance from campus, telephone interviews, videoconferences, or interviews at professional meetings may be scheduled.

Advisement and Program Planning

Prior to registration, newly admitted doctroal candidates meet individually with their faculty advisor to plan the initial phases of their programs.  A tentative plan for the first year or two of study is developed—subject to change as the need arises.  Part-time and full-time programs are arranged depending on the student’s circumstances.  At an early stage in the planning process, students develop a written plan for meeting program objectives that allows adequate time for graduate study during each semester of enrollment and provides for meeting all program requirements within a reasonable period of time. This plan, together with an official program plan, is filed with the Office of Doctoral Studies. Individual advisement meetings are scheduled frequently throughout the student’s tenure in the program and may be initiated by either the student or faculty member. These meetings may be used to plan programs, provide feedback, review past work, deal with school related problems, discuss research, career planning, or discuss other issues.

For the docotral program in Applied Physiology, specific course requirements (or equivalents transferred from previous graduate study) include

1) All coursework required for the Ed.M. degree, plus:

2) Registration in BBSR 5595 every semester in attendance (1 point)

3) Minimum of 15 points in Research Methods and Statistics

4) Minimum of 9 points in substantive study in movement sciences

5) Additional courses required to achieve research and career goals

Certification

When students have completed approximately 60-65 of the total points required for the Ed.D. degree, they are evaluated for "certification," a stage of doctoral study which represents full candidacy for the degree.To achieve certification, the student must complete the certification examination, which is a written comprehansive examination covering the scientific literature on three areas related to the student's selected research specialization area, a literature review, and submit a plan for meeting total program objectives.  A review committee assesses the student’s entire record.  The decision of the committee is then forwarded to the Teachers College Ed.D. Committee for final action on the candidate’s certification.  

Dissertation

Each student completes a dissertation that focuses on a research question in applied physiology.  Through course work, the research seminar, working as an apprentice in the research of faculty and more advanced students, and pilot studies, students develop the skills to complete the dissertation. Many types of questions and methodologies, appropriate to applied physiology research, may be employed in completing the dissertation.  The dissertation research is expected to address a complex research problem and to be of sufficient quality to result in at least three publications to be published in a top journal.  

Throughout the process, the student works closely with his or her advisor on the design and conduct of the doctoral dissertation. Thereafter the student works under the supervision of a dissertation committee until the dissertation is completed.  Once the dissertation is successfully defended, it is expected that students will share what they have learned by presenting at professional meetings and publishing one or more articles.

Degree Policies

Statement of satisfactory progress:  Students are expected to make satisfactory progress toward the completion of degree requirements.  Program faculty will annually review each student’s progress. Please note that satisfactory performance in the applied physiology program is defined as no Incomplete grades and no BBSR or BBS courses in which the grade earned is lower than B. Doctoral students generally are expected to have grades of B or better in coursework in research methods, statistics, and cognate areas.

Where there are concerns about satisfactory progress, students will be informed by the program faculty.  If a student is performing below expectations, he/she may be required to complete additional course work.  The program will provide a plan and timeline for remediation so students know the expectation for them to continue in the program. If satisfactory progress is not maintained, a student may be dismissed from the program.


Doctor of Education: Motor Learning and Control

Doctor of Education: Motor Learning and Control

Motor Learning & Control focuses on the behavioral, biomechanical, and neural bases of development, acquisition, and performance of functional movement skills. Acquisition of skill is examined over the life span in typically developing children and adults and individuals with movement disorders. Movement analysis is used to elucidate the neuromotor control processes underlying skilled performance in everyday functional behaviors. The teacher or therapist’s role in facilitating skill learning and performance is emphasized.

This specialty has five components:

  • Substantive study of theory and research as embodied in lecture and laboratory courses.
  • Development of clinical or educational skills in laboratory and fieldwork courses.
  • Research training to enable students to read and interpret original research and to carry out educational, clinical, or laboratory research.
  • Seminars to discuss theory and research, identification of research problems, and clinical/educational applications.
  • Elective courses to meet specific student needs which may be taken throughout the College and University in such areas as Anatomy, Biology, Business, Chemistry, Computer Science, Health Education, Higher and Adult Education, Neurosciences, Nutrition, Physiology, Psychology, and Science Education. A list of recommended elective and related courses is available to students in the Movement Science office.

 

In the preparation of doctoral students, the goal is to develop those competencies necessary to pursue scholarly and scientific work and to formulate strategies to enhance professional practice. The focus of the Ed.D. program is to prepare leaders of applied research for clinical and educational practice. Graduates often assume positions in clinical academic departments or teaching universities.

 

Research training uses an apprenticeship model. Students work closely with faculty throughout their preparation: initially as apprentices with access to considerable Advisement, subsequently as collaborators, then progressing to a position as independent researchers.

Typically, the dissertation research is an extension of one or two prior studies. Often, research leading up to the dissertation is presented at national meetings or is published in professional journals.

In addition to substantive study and research preparation, students are expected to design an individual program representing their research area and professional concerns. Such preparation requires a significant commitment to graduate study. Doctoral students are required to be engaged in research at least three weekdays per week (on- or off-site) and be available for advisement at least two mornings or afternoons.

For the doctoral program with specialization in Motor Learning, specific course requirements (or equivalents transferred from prior graduate study) are:

 

Substantive Study (23 Credits)

BBS     5060    Neuromuscular response and adaptation to exercise (2 points)

BBS     5068    Brain and Behavior I: Communication in the nervous system (2 points)

BBSR   5055    Bases of motor control systems (3)

BBSR   5582    Research design in the movement sciences (3 points).

BBSR   4060    Motor learning (3) *

BBSR 4161      Motor learning laboratory (2 with co-requisite BBSR 4060) *

BBSR   4151    Laboratory methods in biomechanics (3)

BBSR 5028      Motor development across the lifespan (3 points)

BBSR 4050      Biomechanical analysis of human movement (3 points)

BBSR   5151    Introduction to the analysis of biomechanical signals (3)

BBSR 5504      Research Training Seminar (Section 02) (2-3 points each semester, continuous enrollment required until completion of degree requirements, typically 18 points)

 

Four courses (12 points) selected from:

BBSQ 4047      Early motor behaviors in children: normal and abnormal

BBSR 4055      Neuromotor processes (3)

BBSR 4070      Introduction to Psychosocial Aspects of Sport/Exercise

MSTC 5000      Neurocognitive models of information processing (1-3)

BBSR 5050      Neurophysiology of motor control and electromyography (3)

BBSR 5057      Movement disorders (3)

BBSR 5251      Fieldwork seminar in motor learning and motor control (1-2)

 

Three topical seminars (9)

BBSR 5596      Topics in applied physiology (3)

BBSR 6563      Seminar in neuromotor processes (3)

BBSR 6564      Advanced topics in neuromotor processes (3)

BBSR 6565      Seminar in motor learning and motor control (3)

BBSR 6571      Research seminar in the psychosocial aspects of human movement (3)

 

Statistics sequence minimum (9)

HUDM 4122    Probability and statistical inference

HUDM 5122    Applied regression analysis

HUDM 5123    Linear models and experimental design

 

Two courses in educationally-relevant areas must also be selected from the list below or substituted with advisor permission (6)

C&T 4004        Basic course in school improvement (3)

C&T 4052        Designing curriculum and instruction (3)

C&T 4078        Curriculum and teaching in urban areas (3)

C&T 4114        Multicultural approaches to teaching young children (3)

C&T 4159       Teacher education programs (3)

C&T 5020       The environments of school (3)

ORLD 4010     Purposes and policies of higher education (3)

ORLD 4011     Curriculum and instruction in higher education (3)

ORLD 4040     The American college student (3)

ORLD 4820     Cultural diversity training in higher education settings: Issues and concerns (3)

ORLD 4830     Transforming the curriculum: Theory and practice (3)

 

Individual program and electives (17)

Service Requirements:

  • Teaching Assistantships Program faculty believe strongly in the value of assistant teaching (TA’ing). TA’ing can provide students with valuable opportunities to learn new material, review material previously acquired and obtain teaching skills and materials. The objective of the required teaching assistantship is to provide Ed.D. students with a quality learning experience that will benefit them regardless of whether they pursue academic or nonacademic careers. Doctoral students are required to serve as a teaching assistant for one Masters level course before graduating (whether in a paid or non-paid capacity). Every effort will be made to match student preferences with available opportunities, but students should expect that they may not always receive their first preference. Beyond this, additional teaching assistantship opportunities may be available for more advanced courses.
  • Graduate Study/Clinical Practice Traineeships are available for occupational and physical therapists enrolled in or admitted to degree programs in Movement Science. They are offered in collaboration with several clinical agencies located in the metropolitan New York area that provide services to diverse groups including pediatric, adult, and geriatric clients. These traineeships involve up to 20 hours per week in a clinical setting and provide stipend and tuition benefits. International students may qualify, contingent on obtaining appropriate New York State clinical licensure. The latter may take up to 12 months so interested prospective students should contact the coordinator as soon as possible during the application process. The instructional staff in Movement Science provides clinical supervision. A case study approach is used to directly bridge between substantive study and clinical practice. For more detailed information, contact the Coordinator of Clinical Traineeships at (212) 678-3325.
  • Part-time paid research or laboratory assistantships may be available for students in their middle to advanced stage of study.


Doctor of Philosophy: Kinesiology

Doctor of Philosophy: Kinesiology

 

We offer a full-time PhD in Kinesiology with students specializing either in motor learning and control, applied physiology or physical education. The Ph.D. program requires a full-time commitment to graduate studies and students should not expect to hold outside employment during their studies. This commitment will ensure that advisement, research activities, and course work can be completed to the degree of competence that is expected in a research-intensive degree program. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy emphasizes research and intensive specialization in a field of scholarship.

The minimum requirements for the Ph.D. degree in Kinesiology are: satisfactory completion of a planned program of 75 graduate points beyond the Baccalaureate; submission of a statement of total program indicating periods of intensive study subsequent to the first year of graduate study which accompanies the program plan of study; satisfactory performance on a departmental Certification Examination; and preparation and defense of a research dissertation. In addition, doctoral students in Kinesiology are expected to complete a sequence of three research studies, or the equivalent, to meet degree requirements. Relevant courses completed in other recognized graduate schools to a maximum of 30 points, or 45 points if completed in another Faculty of Columbia University, may be accepted toward the minimum point requirement for the degree. Each degree candidate must satisfy departmental requirements for the award of the M.Phil. degree prior to continuance in the Ph.D. program. These degree requirements are specified in the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy Bulletin, obtainable from the Office of Doctoral Studies. Each student and his or her advisor develop a program that will help the student meet his or her goals and successfully complete the series of studies that meets the research requirements of the program.

For more information about special application requirements, program description and degree program requirements for the Ph.D. program in Kinesiology, contact Professor Gordon at msnsprogram@tc.edu


Application Information

While students come from a variety of fields, the following backgrounds are most appropriate: kinesiology, movement sciences, exercise science, physical therapy, occupational therapy, physical education, athletic training, biology, nutrition, nursing, health education, public health, and psychology. Students with strong academic records who have deficiencies in their science backgrounds, may be admitted on a provisional basis with the understanding that these deficiencies will be remedied with appropriate courses taken in addition to those required for the MA degree. It is strongly recommended that students without undergraduate coursework in anatomy and physiology (usually a two-semester sequence with laboratory) or exercise physiology take these courses or their equivalent prior to entering the program.

It is recommended that prospective students communicate with an academic advisor to discuss program plans prior to admission. Students are encouraged to make an appointment to visit the College to meet with faculty. If desired, it may be possible to audit a class or seminar session during your visit. Applicants are reviewed on an ongoing basis throughout the academic year. Prior to formal admission, enrollment in up to 8 points of study as a non-matriculated student is permitted.

Faculty List

Faculty

Associate Professor of Physical Education
Assistant Professor of Applied Physiology
Professor of Movement Sciences
Professor of Movement Sciences
Associate Professor of Movement Science & Kinesiology

Visiting Faculty

Adj/PTVisiting Prof/PTLecturer Physical Education 111717-6139

Adjunct

Adjunct in Applied Physiology
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Movement Sciences
Adjunct Full Professor of Motor Learning and Control
Adjunct Assistant Professor in Physical Education

Instructors

Professor of Education

For up to date information about course offerings including faculty information, please visit the online course schedule.

Course List

BBS 5060 Neuromuscular responses and adaptation to exercise
A review of the physiology of muscle contraction in addition to in-depth discussion of topics related to the field which include: the relationship between muscle activation and respiration during exercise, muscle fatigue, eccentric versus concentric contractions and adaptation to strength training.
BBSR 4001 Qualitative Research Methods in Biobehavioral Sciences

The course provides students with techniques and strategies for collecting, analyzing, and reporting data from a qualitative perspective. Students will be able to consider various research issues when working with different populations in various contexts, such as schools, clinical settings, health contexts, families, communities, or other organizations.

BBSR 4002 Visual Methods and Education

This seminar-style course has been designed to help students develop a critical understanding and appreciation of the theory, methodology, and foundation ofqualitative visual research methods in an applied context.

BBSR 4005 Applied anatomy and biomechanics
Topics include: gross anatomy and function of human skeletal and muscular systems, mechanics of human movement, and analysis of skills in dance and physical education. Designed primarily for students without a prior course in anatomy or biomechanics. Students will be expected to participate in a laboratory offered immediately preceding the scheduled class time. Lab fee: $50.
BBSR 4050 Biomechanical analysis of human movement
Permission required. Covers the principles and techniques required to analyze human movement, which can be used to develop practical research questions. Quantitative and qualitative techniques for analysis of movement are discussed in relation to the study of learning, motor control, motor development, and motor impairments. Lab fee: $100.
BBSR 4060 Motor learning
Study of factors relating to the acquisition and performance of motor skills. Includes review and analysis of appropriate research findings.
BBSR 4070 Introduction to the psychosocial aspects of sport and exercise

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an in-depth and comprehensive understanding of the psychological and social processes in exercise, sport, and physical activity. The focus is on the key theoretical psychosocial principles that are well known to govern exercise and sport behavior, including the physical, affective, and cognitive aspects. The course explores theoretical, methodological, and applied approaches to a variety of topics including stress, cognition, mood, emotion, perceptions of the self, mental illness, exercise adherence, drug use and addiction, self-regulation and self-control, motivation, goal setting, arousal and performance, group dynamics, coaching, and burnout.

BBSR 4080 Teaching in Physical Education
Constructivist pedagogies in Physical Education
BBSR 4090 Physical fitness, weight control, and relaxation
Contributions of exercise to human well-being throughout life. Classroom, gymnasium, and laboratory experiences included. Designed for teachers, counselors, and others who desire an introduction to basic concepts of physical fitness.
BBSR 4095 Applied physiology I
Prerequisite: a course in human physiology. Physiological bases of exercise. Lectures concerning the effects of exercise on the major physiological systems (cellular, cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, pulmonary, renal, body fluids, hormonal).
BBSR 4151 Laboratory methods in biomechanics

Permission required. Enrollment limited. Prerequisite: BBSR 4050. Students develop technical skills in the application of biomechanics to the study of movement behavior including video-based data collection and computer-based kinematic analysis. Students design and conduct a pilot research study using biomechanical analysis of a functional movement.  Special fee: $100.

BBSR 4161 Motor learning laboratory
An introduction to qualitative and quantitative analysis of movement and action during acquisition of functional skills. Course fee $100. Corequisite: BBSR 4060.
BBSR 4700 Student teaching in physical education
Student teaching in both elementary and secondary schools for a full semester. Includes a required seminar.
BBSR 4861 Workshop in motor learning and control
Students carry out a case study of skill acquisition in a functional movement task and integrate qualitative and quantitative findings in a final essay, characterizing the learning process.
BBSR 5028 Motor development across the lifespan
Review and analysis of theoretical models and experimental research related to development and performance of motor skills throughout the lifespan.
BBSR 5040 Curriculum designs in physical education
Review of existing curriculum designs, traditional and new. Systematic development of curriculum plans.
BBSR 5041 Analysis of teaching in physical education
An analysis of the decisions and actions of teachers in relation to their role as director of learning. Includes experiences in executing and analyzing teaching skills.
BBSR 5050 Neurophysiology of motor control and electromyography
Review and analysis of theoretical models and experimental research related to development and performance of motor skills throughout the lifespan. Advanced topics dealing with the experimental and clinical use of electromyography. Topics will be integrated with the kinematics of movements being observed. A laboratory project using EMG will be required. Lab fee: $50.
BBSR 5055 Bases of motor control systems
Study of control processes subserving the coordination of movement.
BBSR 5095 Exercise and health
The role of exercise in diagnosis, prevention, and rehabilitation of health problems such as cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, diabetes, obesity, and stress. Scientific evidence from both epidemiological and applied practice perspectives are emphasized.
BBSR 5120 Critical Issues in Physical Culture

This course broadly looks at socio-historical and educational issues of social justice in sports, exercise, fitness, and physical education. It offers a sociological, pedagogical, and critical inquiry into the study of human movement.

BBSR 5151 Introduction to the analysis of biomechanical signals

Introduction to MATLAB programming with a focus on variables, conditional statements, loops, data visualization, basic algorithm development, and Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs). Concepts and techniques used in the analysis of biomechanical/biological signals will be applied to kinematic/physiological data (e.g., electromyographic, kinetic, accelerometer, heart rate data, etc.) using MATLAB. Applications of MATLAB extend to the analysis of all types of quantitative data. Thus, students with data from other sources are welcome to use their own data for course assignments. Interactive lectures and weekly labs are intended for students across disciplines to develop the skills required to use MATLAB in their own research.

BBSR 5194 Applied physiology laboratory II
The discussion and practice of techniques for collection and analysis of physiologic data (strength testing, electromyography, computerized data acquisition). Lab fee: $100.
BBSR 5195 Advanced applied physiology laboratory
Prerequisite: BBSR 5194. Introduction of advanced physiologic measurement techniques and concepts. Included are indirect calorimetry, spectrophotometry, vascular volume dynamics, autonomic reflexes, thermoregulation, noninvasive cardiac output, computer data plethysmography, tonometry, acquisition, and post-acquisition analyses. Lab fee: $100.
BBSR 5200 Fieldwork in movement science and education
Permission required. For advanced students prepared to investigate problems.
BBSR 5251 Fieldwork seminar in motor learning and motor control
Applications of theory/research to therapeutic or educational practice for students in field-based settings.
BBSR 5504 Research training in motor learning
Permission required. A competency-based approach to the preparation of researchers in the areas of neuromotor control and perceptual-motor processes. Several learning experiences are offered each semester, involving lectures, laboratory practica, seminars and individual research advisement. Course fee $175
BBSR 5543 Seminar in Physical Education
Examination of current issues in curriculum and teaching in physical education relative to diverse student populations and associations with other disciplines.
BBSR 5582 Research design in movement science and education
Basic concepts of research design and statistical analysis. Students learn to interpret articles and design projects.
BBSR 6201 Supervision of educational or clinical practice in the movement sciences
Permission required. Corequisite: Actual supervisory experience during that semester. For doctoral students in the movement sciences. Field-based experiences in the guidance of therapists or educators engaged in applying the movement sciences to clinical practice.
BBSR 6900 Supervised independent research in movement science and education
Permission required. For advanced students who wish to conduct research under faculty guidance.
BBSR 7500 Dissertation seminar in movement science and education
Permission required. Candidate develops proposal for doctoral dissertation in consultation with advisor. Seminar convenes only on days when candidates present proposals for approval.
BBSR 8900 Dissertation advisement in movement science and education

Individual advisement on doctoral dissertations. Fee to equal 3 points at current tuition rate for each term. For requirements, see section in catalog on Continuous Registration for Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.