DeCarlo, Lawrence T. (ld208)

DeCarlo, Lawrence T.

Professor of Psychology and Education
212-678-4037

Office Location:

453H GDodge

Educational Background

B.A. (Psychology) SUNY at Stony Brook; M.S. (Biostatistics) Columbia University; Ph.D. (Psychology) SUNY at Stony Brook

Scholarly Interests

Statistical modeling of psychological processes, measurement, latent class analysis, categorical data analysis, structural equation modeling, multilevel and longitudinal data analysis, item response theory.

Selected Publications

DeCarlo, L. T.  (2021). On joining a signal detection choice model with response time models. Journal of Educational Measurement, 58, 438-464.

DeCarlo, L. T.  (2021). A signal detection model for multiple-choice exams. Applied Psychological Measurement, 45, 423-440.

DeCarlo, L. T., & Zhou, X. (2021). A latent class signal detection model for rater scoring with ordered perceptual distributions. Journal of Educational Measurement, 58, 31-53.

DeCarlo, L. T. (2020). An item response model for true-false exams based on signal detection theory. Applied Psychological Measurement, 44, 215-229.

DeCarlo, L. T. (2019). Insights from reparameterized DINA and beyond. In M. von Davier, & Y.-S. Lee (Eds.), Handbook of Diagnostic Classification Models (pp. 223-243). New York: Springer.


DeCarlo, L. T.  (2021). On joining a signal detection choice model with response time models. Journal of Educational Measurement, 58, 438-464.

DeCarlo, L. T.  (2021). A signal detection model for multiple-choice exams. Applied Psychological Measurement, 45, 423-440.

DeCarlo, L. T., & Zhou, X. (2021). A latent class signal detection model for rater scoring with ordered perceptual distributions. Journal of Educational Measurement, 58, 31-53.

DeCarlo, L. T. (2020). An item response model for true-false exams based on signal detection theory. Applied Psychological Measurement, 44, 215-229.

DeCarlo, L. T. (2019). Insights from reparameterized DINA and beyond. In M. von Davier, & Y.-S. Lee (Eds.), Handbook of Diagnostic Classification Models (pp. 223-243). New York: Springer.

Kim, Y. K., & DeCarlo, L. T. (2016). Evaluating equity at the local level using bootstrap tests. Research Report No. 2016-4. New York: The College Board.

Kim, Y. K., DeCarlo, L. T., & Reshetar, R. (2014). Linking with constructed response items: A hierarchical model approach with AP data. KAERA Research Forum, 1, 26-35.

DeCarlo, L. T. (2013). Signal detection models for the same-different task. Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 57, 43-51.

Zhang, S. S., DeCarlo, L. T., & Ying, Z. (2013). Non-identifiability, equivalence classes, and attribute-specific classification in Q-matrix based cognitive diagnosis models. Available at: http://arxiv.org/abs/1303.0426v1

DeCarlo, L. T. (2012). Recognizing uncertainty in the Q-matrix via a Bayesian extension of the DINA model. Applied Psychological Measurement, 36, 447-468.

DeCarlo, L. T. (2012). On a signal detection approach to m-alternative forced choice with bias, with maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches to estimation. Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 56, 196-207.

DeCarlo, L. T., Kim, Y. K., & Johnson, M. S. (2011). A hierarchical rater model for constructed responses, with a signal detection rater model. Journal of Educational Measurement, 48, 333-356.

DeCarlo, L. T. (2011). Signal detection theory with item effects. Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 55, 229-239. 

DeCarlo, L. T. (2011). On the analysis of fraction subtraction data: The DINA model, classification, latent class sizes, and the Q-matrix. Applied Psychological Measurement, 35, 8-26. 

O'Connell, K. A., Shiffman, S., & DeCarlo, L. T. (2011). Does extinction of responses to cigarette cues occur during smoking cessation? Addiction, 106, 410-417.

DeCarlo, L. T. (2010). On the statistical and theoretical basis of signal detection theory and extensions: Unequal variance, random coefficient, and mixture models. Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 54, 304-313. 

DeCarlo, L. T. (2010). Studies of a latent-class signal-detection model for constructed response scoring II: Incomplete and hierarchical designs (ETS Research Report No. RR-10-08). Princeton NJ: ETS. 

DeCarlo, L. T. (2008). Studies of a latent-class signal-detection model for constructed response scoring (ETS Research Rep. No. RR-08-63). Princeton NJ: ETS. 

DeCarlo, L. T. (2008). Process dissociation and mixture signal detection theory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 34, 1565-1572.

Teghtsoonian, M., Teghtsoonian, R., & DeCarlo, L. T. (2008). The influence of trial-to trial recalibration on sequential effects in cross-modality matching. Psychological Research, 72, 115-122. 

DeCarlo, L. T. (2007). The mirror effect and mixture signal detection theory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 33, 18-33.

DeCarlo, L. T. (2006). Sequential effects in successive ratio estimation. Perception & Psychophysics, 68, 861-871. 

DeCarlo, L. T. (2005). A model of rater behavior in essay grading based on signal detection theory. Journal of Educational Measurement, 42, 53-76. 

DeCarlo, L. T. (2005). On bias in magnitude scaling and some conjectures of Stevens. Perception & Psychophysics, 67, 886-896.

DeCarlo, L. T. (2003). An application of signal detection theory with finite mixture distributions to source discrimination. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 29, 767-778.

DeCarlo, L. T. (2003). Source monitoring and multivariate signal detection theory, with a model for selection. Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 47, 292-303. 

DeCarlo, L. T. (2003). Using the PLUM procedure of SPSS to fit unequal variance and generalized signal detection models. Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, & Computers, 35, 49-56.

DeCarlo, L. T. (2003). An application of a dynamic model of judgment to magnitude production. Perception & Psychophysics, 65, 152-162. 

DeCarlo, L. T. (2002). Signal detection theory with finite mixture distributions: Theoretical developments with applications to recognition memory. Psychological Review, 109, 710-721.

DeCarlo, L. T. (2002). A latent class extension of signal detection theory, with applications. Multivariate Behavioral Research, 37, 423-451.

DeCarlo, L. T., & Luthar, S. S. (2000). Analysis and class validation of a measure of parental values perceived by early adolescents: An    application of a latent class model for rankings. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 60, 578-591.

DeCarlo, L. T. (1998). Signal detection theory and generalized linear models. Psychological Methods, 3, 186-205.

DeCarlo, L. T. (1997). On the meaning and use of kurtosis. Psychological Methods, 2, 292-307.

DeCarlo, L. T. (1994). A dynamic theory of proportional judgment: Context and judgment of length, heaviness, and roughness. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 20, 372-381.

DeCarlo, L. T., & Tryon, W. W. (1993). Estimating and testing autocorrelation with small samples: A comparison of the C-statistic to a modified estimator. Behavior Research and Therapy,31, 781-788. 

DeCarlo, L. T. (1992). Intertrial interval and sequential effects in magnitude scaling. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 18, 1080-1088.

DeCarlo, L. T. & Cross, D. V. (1990). Sequential effects in magnitude scaling: Models and theory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 104, 375-396.

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